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Kakapo

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germananglophile
986086.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:22 am Reply with quote

is a critically endangered flightless parrot in New Zealand. Apparently it didn't have any natural predators until human colonization brought them along. So the fact that the Kakapo male emits loud booming noises to attract mates which can be heard over several kilometers and also attract predators does not help... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakapo

 
priya
986145.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 3:11 pm Reply with quote

Fact from the wiki link - The oldest known Kakapo, "Richard Henry", was thought to be 80 years old at the time of his death in December 2010.

:) nice name for a Kakapo?

 
CB27
986170.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:24 pm Reply with quote

A certain QIer famously got a close view of just how "charming" these birds can be:

http://youtu.be/9T1vfsHYiKY

 
germananglophile
986172.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:31 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
A certain QIer famously got a close view of just how "charming" these birds can be:

http://youtu.be/9T1vfsHYiKY


Poor Mark Carwardine!!! <:D
Although - judging by this display I'm even less optimistic about the Kakapo's survival as a species. If the males are THAT oblivious to what a potential female mate looks like...

 
CB27
986180.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:18 pm Reply with quote

Don't knock it, my cat has a very unhealthy relationship with a teddy bear we got him to scratch on. After two and a half year, Teddy doesn't have a scratch on him, but he does have the look of an emotionally scarred toy...

:)

 
germananglophile
986182.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:37 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
Don't knock it, my cat has a very unhealthy relationship with a teddy bear we got him to scratch on. After two and a half year, Teddy doesn't have a scratch on him, but he does have the look of an emotionally scarred toy...

:)


Oh, not knocking it, by all means. (Although feeling slightly sorry for emotionally scarred Teddy. ;D My own cat is VERY partial to a woolen blanket.)
But then again neither cats nor teddy bears and blankets are on the verge of extinction... *sigh* Silly, silly Kakapo.

 
germananglophile
986183.  Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:38 pm Reply with quote

priya wrote:
Fact from the wiki link - The oldest known Kakapo, "Richard Henry", was thought to be 80 years old at the time of his death in December 2010.

:) nice name for a Kakapo?


That's quite a long-lived bird! :D

 
AlmondFacialBar
986218.  Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:38 am Reply with quote

germananglophile wrote:
CB27 wrote:
A certain QIer famously got a close view of just how "charming" these birds can be:

http://youtu.be/9T1vfsHYiKY


Poor Mark Carwardine!!! <:D
Although - judging by this display I'm even less optimistic about the Kakapo's survival as a species. If the males are THAT oblivious to what a potential female mate looks like...


In fairness, IIRC that one was hand reared and therefore wasn't quite sure about his species. ;-)

Kakapos are doing a lot better today than they did when they first came to global attention in 1990, btw. Back when Douglas and Mark were there for Last Chance to See there were 42 (!) left, now there are comfortably over 100. Still not enough, but getting there I guess...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
germananglophile
998659.  Thu May 23, 2013 5:56 am Reply with quote

awwww...(via Stephen Fry twitter)

http://www.arkive.org/worlds-favourite#

 
CB27
998695.  Thu May 23, 2013 7:59 am Reply with quote

How come the Slow Loris is not on that list? It woz robbed!!!

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
1032065.  Mon Oct 28, 2013 3:43 pm Reply with quote

Interesting point about the bird losing it's fear by being nocturnal to avoid predation.

 
djgordy
1032143.  Tue Oct 29, 2013 5:13 am Reply with quote

germananglophile wrote:
priya wrote:
Fact from the wiki link - The oldest known Kakapo, "Richard Henry", was thought to be 80 years old at the time of his death in December 2010.

:) nice name for a Kakapo?


That's quite a long-lived bird! :D


Parrot and their relatives are probably the longest living birds. Barring accidents and disease, captive ones of the larger varieties such as cockatoos and Amazonian species can easily live to 70-80 years.

There is a macaw called Charlie the Cursor who is supposedly 114 years old.

 

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