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Kick

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FranceyThat
980520.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 1:01 am Reply with quote

It's time to share with you what I have been working on.

The word Kick.

Language got me started, the word and all it's different meanings in idioms and phrases. Wandered off into Sports, of course, with many involving kicks. Martial arts, football etc. Then, found the term Pulsar Kick, and wandered off into space. Wandered back again, and went right to the bottom of the sea. Yes indeed, there is a submarine volcano called Kick Em Jenny (in the Caribbean) (spell check says I spelled that right?)

Back on the surface, listened to some music by INXS, and their 6x platinum effort "Kick". But then, really had to get back to work at the mines, lo and behold, more Kick happening there with the nitrogen kickoff and the drilling kick. What's more relaxing after work than a bit of history and art, right? found this "A Kick at the Broad Bottoms" at the British Museum.

All surely just the tip of the iceberg :)

 
'yorz
980524.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 2:54 am Reply with quote

Well done!

Although only known to a select few, Kick Wilstra was an immensely popular Dutch comic strip from the 1950s, about a Dutch footballer who during the course of his career also played for Malton-Rovers when WW2 forced him to flee to the UK and lateron he became the first Dutch professional when he was signed up by Italy's Titan. Name and playing style were based on three legendary footballers of the day: Kick Smit, Faas Wilkes, and Abe Lenstra.

 
FranceyThat
980532.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 3:55 am Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Well done!

Although only known to a select few, Kick Wilstra was an immensely popular Dutch comic strip from the 1950s, about a Dutch footballer who during the course of his career also played for Malton-Rovers when WW2 forced him to flee to the UK and lateron he became the first Dutch professional when he was signed up by Italy's Titan. Name and playing style were based on three legendary footballers of the day: Kick Smit, Faas Wilkes, and Abe Lenstra.


My dutch background makes me very interested to hear this!

 
Alfred E Neuman
980539.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:44 am Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Name and playing style were based on three legendary footballers of the day: Kick Smit, Faas Wilkes, and Abe Lenstra.


I can't imagine Kick Smit was baptised that?

 
'yorz
980586.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 7:05 am Reply with quote

No, he wasn't.
Quote:
Johannes Chrishostomos "Kick" Smit (3 November 1911, Bloemendaal, North Holland 1 July 1974, Haarlem) was a Dutch football player. He earned 29 caps and scored 26 goals for the Netherlands national football team, and played in the 1934 and 1938 World Cups. During his club career, he played for HFC Haarlem.


Chrishostomos is a very unusual name, at least in the Netherlands. Never heard it before. Greek, apparently.
Ah - some googling learned that his parents were RC.

 
bemahan
980607.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 7:46 am Reply with quote

Not quite 'kick' but I collected frog-related items as a child and, on a holiday to Bruges, discovered that in Flemish a frog is a "kikker". Given its swimming style, it seemed a very fitting name to me.

 
'yorz
980612.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 7:54 am Reply with quote

Same in Dutch.

 
FranceyThat
980927.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:32 pm Reply with quote

bemahan wrote:
Not quite 'kick' but I collected frog-related items as a child and, on a holiday to Bruges, discovered that in Flemish a frog is a "kikker". Given its swimming style, it seemed a very fitting name to me.


QI seems to wander quite a distance from the letter sometimes, I have to really think about which series I'm watching.

The frog kick warrants some investigation, so off I go!

 
FranceyThat
980928.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:35 pm Reply with quote

Yes indeed some interesting froggie facts to be had.
The frog kick is a swimming action sometimes used by scuba divers when they are swimming near a soft silty seabed or lakebed which they do not want to stir up damaging the visibility. It is like the swimming action of a frog or the leg part of the breaststroke. It is often used in cave diving and wreck diving where silt stirring can cause dramatic loss in visibility.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frog_kick

and now to find something scientific too.

 
FranceyThat
980929.  Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:43 pm Reply with quote

Good Gracious.
Route 66 is spreading disease in frogs. In a nutshell. Here's a more complicated read:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3141021/?tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract

 

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