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Renaming towns

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Ian Dunn
756874.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 11:22 am Reply with quote

You may remember earlier in the current series that the panel suggested renaming boring town's like Hull, Slough and Staines with exciting new names like "Yippie".

Well, it seems that Staines has taken the message on broad. There is a proposal to rename the town. Granted, it is just to Staines-on-Thames, but it's a start.

Source: BBC

 
Dr. Know
756880.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 11:26 am Reply with quote

Staines on the Thames ... sounds about right.

 
suze
756904.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 12:57 pm Reply with quote

There's no real tradition of renaming towns in Britain, but in some countries it's rather more common.

The Soviet bloc did lots of it - St Peterburg to Leningrad, Chemnitz to Karl-Marx-Stadt, Montana (Bulgaria) to Mihailovgrad, and so on. Most of these renamings have been reverted in the last twenty years, although not Kaliningrad. Some residents use "Kionig", which is a quasi-Russian form of Königsberg, but it has no official status. Some places in the west too have been renamed for political reasons (for instance, Kitchener, Ontario used to be called Berlin).

Then there are the renamed towns in places which have gained autonomy or independence. Salisbury to Harare is an obvious example, or Maryborough, Queen's County to Port Laoise, Co Laois. Or Iqaluktuuttiaq, Nunavut - which was called Cambridge before Nunavut was created. (It has no university and not many bicycles, but it is bloody freezing all year round.)

And then some places have done it to make money out of TV stations. The best known example is Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which was called Hot Springs until NBC announced that it would record an edition of a game show named Truth or Consequences in the first town to change its name to that of the show. Comparably, Clark, Texas changed its name to DISH to get money from a satellite TV firm.

QI, Rutland, anyone?

 
WordLover
756905.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 1:23 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
St Peterburg to Leningrad
KLAXON

St Petersburg was renamed Petrograd, which was then renamed Leningrad.

 
Ian Dunn
756906.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 1:23 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
QI, Rutland, anyone?


I propose "Crickey".

 
Bondee
756912.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 1:50 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
Well, it seems that Staines has taken the message on broad. There is a proposal to rename the town. Granted, it is just to Staines-on-Thames, but it's a start.

Source: BBC


This one gets trotted out time and time again. I must've heard it at least 10 times in my lifetime.

Tellingly, there's no mention of it on the local news site.

This bit made me laugh...

Quote:
Colin Davis, Spelthorne Borough Council's cabinet member for economic development, said the town had a reputation it did not deserve.

He said: "The ancient and honourable name of Staines has been sullied by negligent reporting by the media on one hand and perhaps irresponsible humour on the part of others such as Ali G.

"Most people don't know where Staines is. Most people don't know it's on one of the most beautiful reaches of the River Thames."


It may "be on one of the most beautiful reaches of the River Thames" but it isn't the River Thames. It's Staines. Leave out the "e" and you've got a good description of the place! It's the scum that live here who have sullied "the ancient and honourable name of Staines"! The same scum who believe that Ali G is real and model themselves on him!

And if Bobby Davro loves the place so much, why did he move to Datchet?

As I said on the "Happiness" thread in the Green Room, you could give Staines the most pleasant sounding name in the world and it wouldn't change anything

Staines upon Thames, Woo-hoo!, Littlefluffykittenville... It's still a shit-hole

This is more like it...
Town considering name change to Shithole-on-Thames

Quote:
You might not be able to polish a turd, but you can make it seem a little less turd-like by renaming it Turd-on-Thames.


Can you guess I don't much like the place?

 
suze
756916.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:00 pm Reply with quote

Staines-on-Thames is rubbish, anyways. If Staines were to be renamed anything, then it probably ought to be Spelthorne.

That's the name of the borough centred on Staines, and it isn't the name of an existing town or village. (We shall pretend not to notice, as the borough pretends not to notice, that most of the medieval Hundred for which the borough is named is actually in the London Borough of Hounslow these days.)

 
Dr. Know
756927.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:57 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
suze wrote:
QI, Rutland, anyone?


I propose "Crickey".



If anywhere is to be hamed after QI it should be called 'Klaxon'.

I'm trying to think of a pun about the last train to Klaxon.

 
mckeonj
756936.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 3:50 pm Reply with quote

Would it help to know that a klaxon is also called an oogah?

 
Zebra57
756984.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:16 pm Reply with quote

Why not call Staines St Annes on Thames. I believe that the name Staines was derived from St Annes.

 
violetriga
756985.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:18 pm Reply with quote

Of course, some places change their name for free TV or after a TV show...

 
zomgmouse
757010.  Mon Nov 01, 2010 8:56 pm Reply with quote

Melbourne used to be called Batmania, albeit not officially. But we did have a train station called Batman's Hill (which was then itself renamed - twice).

 
djgordy
757026.  Tue Nov 02, 2010 3:31 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
QI, Rutland, anyone?


The name Rutland has been recorded since the Domesday Book. Although the county disappeared as an administrative district for a while, the geographical area was still called Rutland.

 
RLDavies
757098.  Tue Nov 02, 2010 7:58 am Reply with quote

A reasonably QI and amusing column in today's Telegraph:
It's worth sticking with plain old Staines

Apparently the name means "Stone", but evolved rather oddly.

 
Bondee
757202.  Tue Nov 02, 2010 3:49 pm Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
Why not call Staines St Annes on Thames. I believe that the name Staines was derived from St Annes.


Not so...

RLDavies wrote:
A reasonably QI and amusing column in today's Telegraph:
It's worth sticking with plain old Staines

Apparently the name means "Stone", but evolved rather oddly.


From said column...
Quote:
It started off happily a thousand years ago as Stan, like the helpful man next-door who will show you how to mend a fuse. If history had gone to plan it should, by rights, now be called Stone. "The development of the name is very irregular," remarks the Cambridge Dictionary of Place-Names disapprovingly.


Not quite...

It was originally called Negen Stanes (Saxon for "nine stones") after a stone circle that sat at the convergence of 9 ley-lines. The circle was comprised of (yep, you got it!) nine stones. The site of the circle is now the Sainsbury's roundabout near Staines Bridge.

A twelfth century charter from nearby Chertsey Abbey reads...
Quote:
Down to that Eyre that stands in the Thames at Lodders Lake and so along Thames by mid-stream to Glenthuthe, from Glenhuthe by mid-stream along Thames to the Huthe before Negen Stones.


sources: http://www.stainesnet.com/
http://www.ahsoc.fsnet.co.uk/staines/
(the second link has a lot more information on the stone circle)

The name of the nearby village of Stanwell is often thought to be a contraction of St. Annes well, but the "Stan" part of the name also derives from the Saxon word for stone. You can still see the stone well on Town Lane, the main road into the village, today.

 

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