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Interesting country facts and figures

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CB27
999554.  Sun May 26, 2013 10:11 pm Reply with quote

Depends on when she left Brazil and where she came from.

Up until just a few years ago you had to renounce your Brazilian citizenship if you lived abroad, so you couldn't have a dual nationality. Additionally, I'd say anyone who left Brazil before the early 90s might remember the political and social somewhat differently to what it is today.

 
Arcane
999563.  Sun May 26, 2013 10:39 pm Reply with quote

I don't understand why countries, particularly the US, have this obsession with calling themselves "Irish-American" or "Scottish-American" or whatnot. I got into a rather heated discussion once with someone who kept referring to themselves as "Asian", so I asked them where in Asia they lived. "oh no, I'm in the US", they said. So I asked I they'd been born in Asia and moved to the US, to which they said no, they'd been born there but their ancestors had come from Asia (China) and everyone since had married someone with a Chinese ancestry so he'd remained "Asian". I couldn't get this person to recognise they were "American", as they and a couple of generations had been born there. No, they were Asian. I gave up.

As you know, I was born in the UK and emigrated with my parents here when I was 10. I'm an Australian Citizen and have lived here for over 3/4 of my life. I am Australian, not English Australian, or Australian English. I am a citizen of this country and therefore Australian. I find it odd that someone is happy to say "I'm a citizen of this country but really I belong to another too, even though I may have never set foot in it or haven't been there for many years, don't vote, pay taxes, or otherwise participate in that countries life in any way but Ill still say I'm kinda from there". Odd.

I feel no sense of belonging to England, why would I want to or bother? If I wanted to be English, I should move back there permanently. I've been back three times and not felt any longing to be there. I felt like a tourist, a stranger. This is where I've become a citizen of and where my home is and where I should be loyal to, not a place I am not part of.

 
CB27
999565.  Sun May 26, 2013 11:20 pm Reply with quote

I think it's easier when two countries share a heritage, like the UK and Australia. When you have two countries that don't share a heritage, people tend to find it empowering to identify themselves according to their different backgrounds.

Some countries have a wonderful way of dealing with it by giving people of ancestry from one country, but living in another (or even born in another) a different term. The Japanese have it down to an art, the first generation to emigrate to other countries are called Issei, the first generation born in another country are called Nisei, and the second generation born in another country are called Sansei, the next generation is Yonsei, and so on. I'm guessing in about a hundred years time, there will be 9 generations born aborad in some countries, and they'll be known as Jusei, which will sound delicious :)

You also have the complete opposite. In Israel, because many Jews emigrated into the country, there was great pride for those actually born in the country, and they became known as Sabras. In the last few years the proportion of Sabras in Israel finally passed the 50% mark and is now around 70%, which is part of why it seems more offensive now to the majority there when some people claim it's not their home.

 
suze
999672.  Mon May 27, 2013 7:12 am Reply with quote

Arcane wrote:
I don't understand why countries, particularly the US, have this obsession with calling themselves "Irish-American" or "Scottish-American" or whatnot.


Possibly you have to be one to fully understand the concept. No one identifies as an "English American" any more than you see yourself as an "English Australian". (You might hear "English Canadian", but that's different - it means English-speaking, and doesn't necessarily imply origin in England.)

That's because England is the default place of origin for Americans, Canadians, and Australians - and one tends only to identify as a hyphen-American (Australian, Canadian) if one is other than the default. Julia Gillard has been known to refer to herself as a Welsh Australian, I absolutely do see myself as a Polish Canadian, Minerva Moon sees herself as an Asian American, and so on.

 
AlmondFacialBar
999680.  Mon May 27, 2013 7:18 am Reply with quote

Josh Ritter identifies as German, which has made me laugh in his face more than once. His folks have been in Allentown pretty much since the place was founded, for fuck's sake!

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
CB27
999826.  Mon May 27, 2013 1:41 pm Reply with quote

I had a little speck on my screen at just the right place, and for a moment that read as Alientown :)

 
Arcane
999977.  Mon May 27, 2013 7:46 pm Reply with quote

Sorry suze, but I still don't understand WHY. What is the benefit of that in a country that bangs on about patriotism to the country and allegiance to the flag? What's the point of giving yourself a label that says "I'm not totally American"?

And these days in Australia the "default" is not necessarily English immigrants.

 
CB27
999978.  Mon May 27, 2013 7:49 pm Reply with quote

It's not about nationality, more about culture.

You don't usually get people calling themselves English Australian, or English American because the culture is pretty much similar.

Eveyone likes to define themselves in various ways.

 
AlmondFacialBar
999988.  Tue May 28, 2013 1:57 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
I had a little speck on my screen at just the right place, and for a moment that read as Alientown :)


Your youlgreaving instinct is spot on...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Arcane
999990.  Tue May 28, 2013 2:24 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
It's not about nationality, more about culture.

You don't usually get people calling themselves English Australian, or English American because the culture is pretty much similar.

Eveyone likes to define themselves in various ways.


And you've experienced this by living in Australia? Hate to break it to you, but as I've lived in both countries, personal experience says they are nothing alike. As I've said before; I've felt a stranger when I've gone back with no sense of "home" or familiarity. Maybe 60 years or more ago we were alike but no longer. The culture is nothing alike.

 
AlmondFacialBar
999991.  Tue May 28, 2013 2:49 am Reply with quote

Yikes, Arcane, why does that piss you off so much? Different countries handle theiur cultural heritage in different ways, simple as that.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
sally carr
1000000.  Tue May 28, 2013 4:08 am Reply with quote

I am Anglo Saxon.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1000002.  Tue May 28, 2013 4:17 am Reply with quote

Are you? Then you're pretty much a minority of one. Very very few English people still actually are.

Typical German mutt here, I'd hyphenate myself if it didn't entail at least four of them. ;-)

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
sally carr
1000007.  Tue May 28, 2013 4:26 am Reply with quote

That's how I think of myself (from my father's side at least.) Our family name has saxon origins and comes from around the New Forest in Hampshire

 
Arcane
1000032.  Tue May 28, 2013 5:13 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Yikes, Arcane, why does that piss you off so much? Different countries handle theiur cultural heritage in different ways, simple as that.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


It's annoying when someone makes broad assumptions without evidence or truth. It's amazing how a couple of weeks ago there was a fair bit of Aussie bashing going on and now I'm being told by people who haven't even lived in the country that we're alike. Sorry, can't have it both ways.

 

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