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The Danish connection (knight, knife, knob, knot, kalmar)

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AlmondFacialBar
968488.  Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:11 am Reply with quote

Rasmus wrote:
Jenny wrote:
Danish pastries are called Viennese pastries in Denmark, I believe, having been originally imported there by an Austrian pastry chef.

Myarh, almost. It wasn't just one man, and the people who brought the recipes had a less posh title: They were scabs. Not pastry chefs.

You might be thinking of August Zang, who brougt pâtisseries viennoises to France.

But let's do the story of Danish pastry, or Wienerbrød. In the latter part of the 1700's, large parts of the labor force in Danish bakeries (mainly in Copenhagen) were immigrants from Switzerland and to a lesser extend what is now Austria and Bavaria. To combat unemployment, a ban on foreign workers was supposedly issued on Oct 18, 1820. I have not been able to find a copy of this legislation.

Wages rose, and in 1850 the Danish born laborers went on strike. Instead of negotiating, the bakeries imported a new workforce from Vienna (Wien). They were considered to be scabs by the striking Danes, so they tried to obstruct their work by denying access to original Danish recipies and to a degree supplies. Thus the Austrian bakers had to bake from their own recipies.

The Danish public took to these new "Plundergebäcken" cakes, and when the Danish laborers went back to work, they had to submit to their Austrian colleagues. Allegedly the Austrians responded to the rough treatment they had received during the strike, and refused to share their recipies. Thus Danes and Austrians worked side by side, both trying to copy each other.

This odd coupling led to the Danish pastry we now know.

Source:
Carl-Bertil Widell: En sockerbagere här bor i staden (9789188184085)

But why has the world come to know it as Danish pastry?
That's more simple: L.C. Klitteng (photo). Danish baker from Læsø moved to America, and in December 1915 he served the goods at President Woodrow Wilson's wedding. This generated enormous publicity, and he subsequently opened a school, teaching Americans to bake this Danish pastry.

Source:
http://www.kagekagekage.dk/2012/03/wienerbrdets-apostel-om-lsbageren-l-c.html


Plunder, btw, is actually the German word for clutter, which I think is a rather nice name for a rather shapeless pastry. These days they're only called Plunder (clutter), too, and no longer Plundergebäck (clutter pastries).

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Rasmus
970802.  Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:09 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Plunder, btw, is actually the German word for clutter, which I think is a rather nice name for a rather shapeless pastry. These days they're only called Plunder (clutter), too, and no longer Plundergebäck (clutter pastries).


Cool! I didn't know that. Just moved to France, and was quite surprised to see the pastry called viennoiseries here. Don't know why, but I've never spend much time in a German bakery.

But from my time in England, I recall a brand of toast bread called "Danish". That sort of offended me, as it's of a very low quality :-)

 
EXE
971318.  Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:55 am Reply with quote

This doesn't have to do with knighst, knives, knobs, knots, or kalmar, but it does have to do with Denmark (and I guess the K connection would be Kepler): Tycho Brahe wore a prosthetic nose. His nose has its own section on his Wikipedia page, which is pretty remarkable.

 
Rasmus
976751.  Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:40 pm Reply with quote

EXE wrote:
This doesn't have to do with knighst, knives, knobs, knots, or kalmar, but it does have to do with Denmark (and I guess the K connection would be Kepler): Tycho Brahe wore a prosthetic nose. His nose has its own section on his Wikipedia page, which is pretty remarkable.


Yeah, there is a billion QI things about Tycho Brahe. Another K connection is his birthplace, Knutstorps Borg, or his alma mater Københavns Universitet.

He was truly a European scientist. He was born in a part of Denmark (then Denmark-Norway) now occupied by Sweden, he studied in Denmark, Germany, Swizerland and Italy and is buried in Praha. He was given the small island Hven (Ven) in Øresund between what is now Denmark and Sweden, where he build an observatory, the ruins of which I visited every year as a child.

There are many myths about him. Several of them regards the cause of death. One goes like this: He was dining with the king, and had to go to the toilet. This was not permitted whilst in royal company, so he held it in. Eventually his bladder burst, and died from the internal bleeding.

Others claim he died from mercury poisoning, as his prosthetic nose supposedly contained mercury. In 2010 his body was exhumed to (amongst other things) test for this.


Last edited by Rasmus on Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:22 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Zebra57
976805.  Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:26 pm Reply with quote

Rasmus wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Plunder, btw, is actually the German word for clutter, which I think is a rather nice name for a rather shapeless pastry. These days they're only called Plunder (clutter), too, and no longer Plundergebäck (clutter pastries).


Cool! I didn't know that. Just moved to France, and was quite surprised to see the pastry called viennoiseries here. Don't know why, but I've never spend much time in a German bakery.

But from my time in England, I recall a brand of toast bread called "Danish". That sort of offended me, as it's of a very low quality :-)


Viennese bakers in France reportedly came with Marie Antoinette.

 

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