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O for the wings, for the wings of a dove...

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Jenny
48130.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:00 pm Reply with quote

A thread in Quite Interestrings has inspired me to find out that doves are actually a type of pigeon. The term "dove" refers to small and medium-sized birds, while large-sized birds usually go by "pigeon." In some species these terms are applied interchangeably.

It used to be thought, before the 19th century, that pigeons always sit on two eggs which produce a male and a female, hence the term 'pigeon pair' for a family of a son and a daughter, though strictly speaking this should only apply to boy and girl twins.

Source: http://www.gamebird.com/dove.html and Brewers Dictionary of Phrase and Fable.


Last edited by Jenny on Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:07 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
48131.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:01 pm Reply with quote

Darwin was told by the editor of The Origin of Species that his subject matter was a little abstruse, and that he should write a book about pigeons, because 'everybody is interested in pigeons'.

 
Jenny
48132.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:01 pm Reply with quote

We've done the 'why don't pigeons like going to the movies?' thing though, haven't we?

 
Jenny
48133.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:04 pm Reply with quote

The jacobin pigeon was, according to Encarta, Queen Victoria's favourite variety. So at least we know that she would have approved of a book on pigeons.

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Jenny
48135.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:11 pm Reply with quote

O for the wings, for the wings of a dove!
Far away, far away would I rove!
O for the wings, for the wings of a dove!
Far away, far away, far away, far away would I rove!
In the wilderness build me a nest,
And remain there forever at rest,
In the wilderness build me,
Build me a nest, and remain there for ever at rest,
In the wilderness build me a nest,
And remain there for ever at rest,
And remain there for ever at rest,
And remain there for ever at rest.
And remain there for ever at rest.
For ever at rest, and remain there for ever at rest,
And remain there for ever at rest.

This lyric is inaccurate isn't it? Are there trees for nest building in the wilderness? And if it remained for ever there at rest, it would starve pretty damn quick.

 
Jenny
48136.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:16 pm Reply with quote

The phrase also appears in at least one version of the Cockney Alphabet:

A for 'Orses .................. ('ay for 'orses)
B for Mutton .................. (Beef or Mutton)
C for Miles ................... (See for Miles)
D for Dumb .................... (Deaf or Dumb)
E for Brick ................... ('eave a Brick)
F for Vescence ................ (Effervescence)
G for Police .................. (Chief of Police)
H for Retirement .............. (Age for Retirement)
I for Lootin' ................. ('ighfalutin)
J for Oranges ................. (Jaffa Oranges)
K for Restaurant .............. (Cafe or Restaurant)
L for Leather ................. ('ell for Leather)
M for Sis' .................... (Emphasis)
N for Lope .................... (Envelope)
O for The Wings Of A Dove ..... (O! for the Wings of a Dove!)
P for Relief .................. (?!?!)
Q for A Bus ................... (Queue for a Bus)
R for Mo' ..................... ('alf a Mo')
S for You ..................... ('s for you = it's for you)
T for Two ..................... (Tea for Two)
U for Me ...................... (You for Me)
V for La France ............... (Vive la France)
W for The Winnings ............ (Double you for the Winnings)
X for Breakfast ............... (Eggs for Breakfast)
Y for Husband ................. (Wife or Husband)
Z for Wind .................... (Zephyr Wind)

 
Celebaelin
48143.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:53 pm Reply with quote

More pigeons

Quote:
Q. Why are people who walk with their feet turned inwards known as being pigeon toed? I have pigeons and I've watched them and the native pigeons that land on my verandah and they walk with their feet straight ahead. The parrots however walk in a very pigeon toed fashion. So why pick a pigeon, when it would be more correct to say parrot toed?
A: Parrots were in short supply in England in the old days and, for that matter, they still are. I can't claim to be an expert on pidgeons but have a shrewd idea that if all thir talons/toes pointed straight ahead they would fall over in even a light wind.
A: City pigeons are always worse for the wear and it's always seems to be the toes that go first. They loose their toe tails, then a toe or two and before long they are hobbling around on disfigured 'bird knuckles'. Perhaps that's where the expression comes from - city pigeons.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/26/messages/1232.html

Quote:
The word is said to be derived from the Chinese pronunciation of the English word business. The pronunciation for business in Cantonese, the dialect of Chinese used in Pidgin, is 生意 saang1 yi3 or 商業 soeng1 jip6 (Mandarin Chinese: sheng1 yi4 and shang4 ye4 respectively). Likely the origins lie in the exclusively-Cantonese term 幫襯 bong1 can3 which means establishing a good business relationship. A universal Chinese term 辦公 baan6 gung1 (ban4 gong1) which means to handle official business would also be a likely candidate. Scholars though dispute this derivation of the word "pidgin", and suggest alternative etymologies since it was known also as "Pigeon English" in reference to imagery of the passenger pigeon. Unfortunately there exists no historical evidence for the term's origins to prove any suggestion.
That name is retained in the form Tok Pisin of Papua New Guinea and Pijin Blong Solomon (Solomon Islands pidgin).
Pidgin English was the name given to a Chinese-English-Portuguese pidgin used for commerce in Canton during the 18th and 19th centuries. In Canton, this contact language was called Canton English. Also referred to as chinglish ("Chinese English") or engrish ("English Chinese").

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pidgin

Quote:
pidgin 1876,
from pigeon English (1859), the reduced form of the language used in China for communication with Europeans, from pigeon (1826), itself a pidgin word, representing a Chinese pronunciation of business. Meaning extended 1921 to "any simplified language."

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pidgin

 
mckeonj
48144.  Sat Jan 28, 2006 4:02 pm Reply with quote

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

Dove (The).

The dove, in Christian art, symbolises the Holy Ghost. In church windows the seven rays proceeding from the dove signify the seven gifts of the Holy Ghost. It also symbolises the human soul, and as such is represented coming out of the mouth of saints at death. 1
A dove with six wings is emblematic of the Church of Christ. 2
The seven gifts of the Holy Ghost are: (1) counsel, (2) the fear of the Lord, (3) fortitude, (4) piety, (5) understanding, (6) wisdom, and (7) knowledge.

Doves or pigeons. The clergy of the Church of England are allegorised under this term in Dryden’s Hind and Panther, part iii. 947, 998–1002.
“A sort of doves were housed too near the hall … [i.e. the private chapel at Whitehall]
Our pampered pigeons, with malignant eyes,
Beheld these inmates [the Roman Catholic clergy].
Tho’ hard their fare, at evening and at morn,
A cruse of water and an ear of corn,
Yet still they grudged that modicum,”

Soiled doves. Women of the demimonde.

Dove —i.e. the diver-bird; perhaps so called from its habit of ducking the head. So also columba (the Latin for dove) is the Greek kolumbis (a diver).

Cul’ver.
Pigeon. (Old English, colver; Latin, columba; hence culver-house, a dove-cote.) 1
“On liquid wing,
The sounding culver shoots.”
Thomson: Spring 452.

Gall of Pigeons.
The story goes that pigeons have no gall, because the dove sent from the ark by Noah burst its gall out of grief, and none of the pigeon family have had a gall ever since.
“For sin’ the Flood of Noah
The dow she had nae ga’.”
Jamieson: Popular Ballads (Lord of Rorlin’s Daughter).

Cul’verkeys.
The keys or flowers of the culver or columba, i.e. columbine. (Anglo-Saxon culfre, a dove.)

Dove. Mahomet had a dove which he used to feed with wheat out of his ear. When the dove was hungry it used to light on the prophet’s shoulder, and thrust its bill into his ear to find its meal. Mahomet thus induced the Arabs to believe that he was inspired by the Holy Ghost in the semblance of a dove. (Sir Walter Raleigh: History of the World, bk. 1. pt. i. chap. vi. (See also Prideaux Life of Mahomet.) )
“Was Mahomet inspired with a dove?”
Shakespeare: 1 Henry VI., i. 2.

 
gerontius grumpus
48197.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 7:41 am Reply with quote

Turtle doves are the subject of some poetic license in th coca cola song.
"Keep honey bees and Apple tees
And snow white turtle doves."


Turtle doves are, of course, beige like the collared doves which have largely replaced them in the UK.

 
Jenny
48236.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 11:08 am Reply with quote

On the twelfth day of Christmas,
my true love sent to me
Twelve drummers drumming,
Eleven pipers piping,
Ten lords a-leaping,
Nine ladies dancing,
Eight maids a-milking,
Seven swans a-swimming,
Six geese a-laying,
Five golden rings,
Four calling birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves,
And a partridge in a pear tree!

But did you know what all these apparently random gifts mean? I didn't until I googled about it. It is in fact an allegorical rendition of the Catholic Catechism.

The symbolism refers to the teachings of the Church and the creed. From the 16th to the 18th century in Britain, the practice of Roman Catholicism was forbidden until the 1836 Reform Acts gave Catholics the right to worship and practice their faith. This song was one way the catechism was dressed up to make it easy for children to learn.

The references are as follows:
The "true love" mentioned in the song refers to God. The "me" who receives the presents refers to every baptized person. i.e. the Church.
1st Day: The partridge in a pear tree is Jesus upon the Cross. In the song, Christ is symbolically presented as a mother partridge because she would feign injury to decoy a predator away from her nestlings. She was even willing to die for them.
The tree is the symbol of the fall of the human race through the sin of Adam and Eve. It is also the symbol of its redemption by Jesus Christ on the tree of the Cross.
2nd Day: The "two turtle doves" refers to the Old and New Testaments.
3rd Day: The "three French hens" stand for faith, hope and love—the three gifts of the Spirit that abide (1 Corinthians 13).
4th Day: The "four calling birds" refers to the four evangelists who wrote the Gospels—Matthew, Mark, Luke and John—which sing the song of salvation through Jesus Christ.
5th Day: The "five golden rings" represents the first five books of the Bible, also called the Jewish Torah: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.
6th Day: The "six geese a-laying" is the six days of creation.
7th Day: The "seven swans a-swimming" refers to the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit: wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety and fear of the Lord.
8th Day: The "eight maids a milking " reminded children of the eight beatitudes listed in the Sermon on the Mount.
9th Day: The "nine ladies dancing" were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit found in Galatians 5:22-23: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self control.
10th Day: The "ten lords a-leaping" represents the Ten Commandments
11th Day: The "eleven pipers piping" refers to the eleven faithful apostles.
12th Day: The ‘twelve drummers drumming" were the twelve points of belief expressed in the Apostles’ Creed: belief in God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, that Jesus Christ was born of the Virgin Mary, made man, crucified, died and arose on the third day, that he sits at the right hand of the father and will come again, the resurrection of the dead and life everlasting.

The source for this was http://www.appleseeds.org/12_days-christmas.htm , but I have seen it in various forms but with the same meanings on different websites.

 
Jenny
48237.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 11:10 am Reply with quote

All species of doves and pigeons feed their young a substance called "pigeon milk." During breeding season, the crops in both males and female adult birds thicken with stored nutrients. These nutritious cells of the crop are discarded and become a thick whitish semi-liquid which is regurgitated and feed to the nestlings.

 
Jenny
48238.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 11:10 am Reply with quote

Another interesting fact about the birds in this family is the way they drink water: they do not tilt back their heads to swallow but instead suck up the water.

Source: http://birding.about.com/cs/birdsdoves/a/doves.htm

 
gerontius grumpus
48287.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 6:36 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
The phrase also appears in at least one version of the Cockney Alphabet:

A for 'Orses .................. ('ay for 'orses)
B for Mutton .................. (Beef or Mutton)
C for Miles ................... (See for Miles)
D for Dumb .................... (Deaf or Dumb)
E for Brick ................... ('eave a Brick)
F for Vescence ................ (Effervescence)
G for Police .................. (Chief of Police)
H for Retirement .............. (Age for Retirement)
I for Lootin' ................. ('ighfalutin)
J for Oranges ................. (Jaffa Oranges)
K for Restaurant .............. (Cafe or Restaurant)
L for Leather ................. ('ell for Leather)
M for Sis' .................... (Emphasis)
N for Lope .................... (Envelope)
O for The Wings Of A Dove ..... (O! for the Wings of a Dove!)
P for Relief .................. (?!?!)
Q for A Bus ................... (Queue for a Bus)
R for Mo' ..................... ('alf a Mo')
S for You ..................... ('s for you = it's for you)
T for Two ..................... (Tea for Two)
U for Me ...................... (You for Me)
V for La France ............... (Vive la France)
W for The Winnings ............ (Double you for the Winnings)
X for Breakfast ............... (Eggs for Breakfast)
Y for Husband ................. (Wife or Husband)
Z for Wind .................... (Zephyr Wind)



Not good for this thread but I knew it as O for the garden wall.

Oh yes and it could be D for Kate, Z for us and I for the engine.

 
Caradoc
48292.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 7:12 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
Jenny wrote:
The phrase also appears in at least one version of the Cockney Alphabet:

Z for Wind .................... (Zephyr Wind)



Not good for this thread but I knew it as O for the garden wall.

Oh yes and it could be D for Kate, Z for us and I for the engine.


How many cockey would pronounce Z as zee?

The version I knew also had "C for thylanders" = Seaforth Highlanders

 
gerontius grumpus
48297.  Sun Jan 29, 2006 7:20 pm Reply with quote

Zed for us - Zephyrus, zee don't enter into it.


C for thylanders is a good one. They carried on fighting instead of getting evacuated at Dunkirk.

 

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