View previous topic | View next topic

Kiwi

Page 1 of 1

Prof Wind Up Merchant
948103.  Mon Oct 29, 2012 3:48 pm Reply with quote

A very interesting flightless bird, lays the largest egg in proportion to its body size of any bird.

 
Posital
948126.  Tue Oct 30, 2012 3:26 am Reply with quote

Wiki wrote:
At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi are by far the smallest living ratites [!?cassowaries, shurely] and lay the largest egg in relation to their body size of any species of bird in the world.

 
mckeonj
948136.  Tue Oct 30, 2012 5:38 am Reply with quote

Found this on Google Images:

Incidentally, one can also see the kiwi's knees.

 
'yorz
948139.  Tue Oct 30, 2012 5:46 am Reply with quote

*winces*

 
sally carr
948154.  Tue Oct 30, 2012 6:51 am Reply with quote

Mmmm!

 
tetsabb
948163.  Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:55 am Reply with quote

Well, one knee -- t'other is obscured by the accompaniment to a huge plate of bacon, fried bread, mushrooms, black pudding and so forth, surely?

 
Starfish13
948551.  Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:14 am Reply with quote

Posital wrote:
Wiki wrote:
At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi are by far the smallest living ratites [!?cassowaries, shurely] and lay the largest egg in relation to their body size of any species of bird in the world.


!? cassowaries are much larger than kiwis. The little spotted kiwi is around 40cm tall, and weighs around 1.5kg, whereas the smallest cassowary, the Dwarf Cassowary, is usually between 1m and 1.5m tall and weighs 18-25kg.

Ratites are large, flightless birds; the classification* includes ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaris and kiwis, as well as a number of extinct forms like the moa. The name derives from the shape of the sternum bone, which is flat (raft-like, from Latin ratis), unlike in other birds which have a process extending outward from the midline of the sternum called the carina/keel.

This means that there is nothing in the bird's anatomy which provides the anchor for the musclature needed for flight. Even if ratites had suitable wings for flying, without this, they still wouldn't be able to fly.

*As with many things in biology this classification is under debate in the light of DNA analysis.

 
krollo
948599.  Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:22 pm Reply with quote

Despite the declaration in Series B (if memory serves) that beaks are measured from the tip of the beak to the nostrils, it seems that the ornithological world is a little split in the world of beak measurement.

Source A: Franconia Notch and the Women who Saved it - p227-228: In July 1997 a study of beak lengths was done from the tip to the back of the head.

Source B: What Do Different Bill Measures Measure and What Is the Best Method to Use in Granivorous Birds?: This 2000 work shows that both beak tip to back of head and beak tip to nostrils are both in use and that the latter is more reliable.

Source C: How to measure a bird's bill: This Cornell University student resource shows a diagram that says that it should be to the front of the head.

Source D:
Bird handling and ringing techniques says that three different measurements could be taken:
"Depending on
the bird species, three different measures of culmen length may be taken: 1) tip of the bill to the base of the skull (passerines); 2) bill tip to the cere (birds of prey); and 3) bill tip to feathering at base of bill (Anatids, waders and other long-billed birds)." I believe that the kiwi would fall into the latter category.

Using this measurement, the shortest beak is apparently of the glossy swiftlet, according to the The Bird Almanac
by David M. Bird, PhD.

TL,DR: There is no universal standard for beak measuring.
[/url]

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
948653.  Thu Nov 01, 2012 4:26 pm Reply with quote

Kiwis use smell rather than sight to navigate round as they are mainly nocturnal. They prefer bushy habitat.

 
'yorz
948656.  Thu Nov 01, 2012 4:42 pm Reply with quote

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group