View previous topic | View next topic

Drake's equation

Page 8 of 9
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

Tas
54453.  Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:10 am Reply with quote

Wouldn't a Dyson sphere get very hot, rather than be cool? Or at least glow with Simpson-raditaion?

:-)

Tas

 
dr.bob
54811.  Thu Feb 23, 2006 9:19 am Reply with quote

Quaintly Ignorant wrote:
Launching a nuclear pulse rocket from earth is entirely possible but I think a polar launch site wold be required to avoid human contamination.


Leaving aside for a moment the problem of non-human contamination, I think even humans will experience plenty of contamination once the rocket gets up into the high atmosphere and carries on chucking nuclear bombs out the back.

Freeman Dyson is definitely an extremely clever man and, like most extremely clever people, is ever so slightly unhinged :)

 
Tas
54831.  Thu Feb 23, 2006 9:48 am Reply with quote

So, why not launch the rocket in a conventional manner, and then pulse blast away to your hearts content when suitably far away?

:-)

Tas

 
Quaintly Ignorant
54852.  Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:34 am Reply with quote

The worry is flooding the Van Haalen (sp) belt with radiation. We are, for the moment at least, well protected by Earth's magnetic field.

"There is a fine line between genius and insanity; I have erased this line."

 
Tas
54854.  Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:36 am Reply with quote

Hang on a sec....if the Van Allen Radiation Belt can handle solar eruptions (flares are sooooo 70s!), surely a few small nukes should cause a worry?

Or is it the specific types of radiation that cause the problem?

:-)

Tas

 
Quaintly Ignorant
54940.  Thu Feb 23, 2006 3:12 pm Reply with quote

I think it becomes a problem for future manned space-flight. Although, it may be possible to clean out lots of the belt with focused nuclear blasts.

 
dr.bob
55070.  Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:19 am Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
Hang on a sec....if the Van Allen Radiation Belt can handle solar eruptions (flares are sooooo 70s!), surely a few small nukes should cause a worry?


No, once you're past the Van Halen (excellent name! :) belts and into space there's no problem. I was just drawing attention to the problems of detontaing several large nuclear devices in the upper atmosphere. That will probably cause significant problems in the environment, especially if it becomes a regular way of launching spacecraft.

 
bobofel
55762.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:46 am Reply with quote

How about a launch station in space, maintained and accessed through a space lift, a long strong fiber stretching from the earth to said space station along which lifts can travel. Ships could be propelled away from the station with minimal effort, due to effective lack of gravity, to a distance where the pulses can be fired.

 
dr.bob
55770.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:55 am Reply with quote

Great idea (though I think Arthur C Clarke got there before you).

Now just invent a "long strong fiber" and you're away :)

 
tetsabb
55782.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 12:17 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Great idea (though I think Arthur C Clarke got there before you).

Now just invent a "long strong fiber" and you're away :)


The Fountains of Paradise by ACC certainly cover this concept. Though Sir Arthur does not claim to have invented it, but attributes it to a Leningrad engineer, Y N Artsutanov in an article in Komsomolskaya Pravda in 1960. Clarke says the concept was first presented in the West in a letter in Science magazine of 11th Feb 1966 by John D. Isaacs, Hugh Bradner and George E Backus.

Would it not have been wonderful if it had been George A Backus, and he had been a pathfinder in computing?

 
Celebaelin
55804.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 1:51 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
Would it not have been wonderful if it had been George A Backus, and he had been a pathfinder in computing?

Maybe. Tell me why and I'll tell you if it's wonderful.

 
tetsabb
55816.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 2:53 pm Reply with quote

A Backus/Abacus/Computing??????

Trying a play on words... it really doesn't work when you explain them, does it?

<< Returns to drawing board

 
mckeonj
55829.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:46 pm Reply with quote

No, because abacus is a calculator, not a computer. A computer is a person, or a device, which uses a calculator.
That's my definition, so don't bother to check it.

 
bobofel
55940.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:19 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Now just invent a "long strong fiber" and you're away :)


I read recently (in New Scientist I think) that scientists working with carbon nanotubes, wonderful thing that they are, have created a very long thin and durable fibre with them that was "one more step towards creating a space lift"

 
PaulCanRead
1194622.  Sun Jun 12, 2016 10:05 am Reply with quote

Our Milky Way galaxy is 100,000 light years in diameter. We have only been generating radio signals for about 100 years. Those signals will only have travelled about 0.1 percentage the distance to the other side of the galaxy.

If there are 10,000 planets in the Milky Way with intelligent life capable of receiving our radio signals, there should be such a planet within 1000 light years from us. In that scenario we might not receive a reply until the year 2100.

Another scenario is, if that if such a civilisation is several thousand, or even a million years old itself, they may have numerous probes in various parts of the galaxy. If a probe is within 100 light years from us, the civilisation may already know of our existence.

 

Page 8 of 9
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group