View previous topic | View next topic

Kings and Queens

Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2

plinkplonk
959953.  Tue Jan 01, 2013 11:03 am Reply with quote

interestinglit wrote:
The best 'King' fact I can think of


What about the King of Siam (as portrayed by Yul Bryner)?

 
EXE
966831.  Sat Jan 26, 2013 7:27 pm Reply with quote

In one earlier QI episode they mentioned that Irish kings had to be physically perfect. According to one myth, a man named Nuada wanted to be king but was disqualified after his arm was cut off in battle. So to allow him to be king, a doctor created a silver arm for him, which I think is a really cool image.

Speaking of Irish kings and queens, I think there is definitely a question to be had out of An Táin Bó Cúailnge! Men experiencing the pain of labor; a hero with seven fingers on each hand, seven toes on each foot, and seven pupils in each eye; a massive war waged over a cow; a beheaded head that speaks. There are just too many good clues here.

 
EXE
966835.  Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:14 pm Reply with quote

Also, this picture of George VI going down a slide strikes me for some reason as hilarious: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/photobooth/2013/01/slide-show-royals-theyre-just-like-us.html#slide_ss_0=3

 
CB27
967581.  Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:34 am Reply with quote

I was searching for something and came across this old thread, which has some Qi stuff about kings:

http://old.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=19570&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

 
nitwit02
967833.  Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:28 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for bringing that one back, CB. Fascinating stuff!

 
CB27
986387.  Wed Apr 03, 2013 10:44 pm Reply with quote

Who was the first King of the Britons?

Klaxons for William, James, Alfred, Aethelred, and other variations.

There can actually be two claims.

The earliest king to be called King Of the Britons could be Cunobeline, sometimes known as Cymbeline, from Shakespeare's play of the same name. Cunobeline ruled an area that today comprises several counties, including Esses, Suffolk, Cambridgshire, Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire. He may have later expanded a bit to the east, and also into Kent. Though there is no direct evidence that Cunobeline called himself King of the Britons, the Roman historian Suetonius gave him that title when he wronte about him a few decades later.

Another candidate is Tiberius Claudius Cogidubnus, who reigned an area which today includes Sussex and Hampshire sometime in the mid to late 1st century AD. A slab of marble found in Chichester and dated to the first century claims "To Neptune and Minerva, for the welfare of the Divine House, by the authority of Tiberius Claudius Cogidubnus, great king of the Britons, the guild of smiths and those in it gave this temple at their own expense ...ens, son of Pudentinus, presented the forecourt." This is the first direct evidence of someone calling themselves King of the Britons.

The last King of the Britons could be Owain Glyndŵr. As the last Welshman to hold the title "Prince of Wales" he would have also been titled King of the Britons, and when the title of Prince of Wales passed permanently to the male living heir to the English (and later British) throne, the title King of the Britons was finished. It's worth noting that Owain had the last laugh because his cousin, Maredudd ap Tudur, fathered Owen Todor, who founded the Tudor dynasty that was to rule over England.

So who is the first King of Great Britain?

Klaxons again for William, James, or either of the above two.

The answer is George I.

Queen Anne was the last monarch to be named separately as Queen of England and Scotland, and with the Act of Union of 1707, she became Queen of Great Britain. Her second cousin, George, became the first King of Great Britain.

 
priya
986396.  Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:35 am Reply with quote

How did ancient Egyptians address their kings?

Pharoahs?

***Klaxons*** (I think)

Pharoah is derived from Greek Pharao, from Hebrew Par'oh, from Egyptian Pero', literally "great house."

It was supposedly used by Greeks and Hebrews to refer to the Egyptian Kings.
So Egyptians must have called their Kings as Kings, or whatever the Egyptian equivalent at that time was but probably not Pharoah!

 
CB27
986530.  Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:49 pm Reply with quote

It might not be Pharaoh, but for some time it could be something akin to "Prao" or "Praa". However, even this is not complete, because this title was only given to rulers from around 1500BC onwards, and may have been an influence left over from the Hyksos (who came from the Middle East), or as an attempt to establish a different title to rulers.

Pharaohs took on a god's name as part of their own name (Amun, Aten, etc), and this might have been a way of establishing their significance as a ruler, without a further title. At some time this changed, possibly due to increased communications between different kingdoms in antiquity and the need to establish to others who the ruler of Egypt was through a title.

 
djgordy
986533.  Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:04 pm Reply with quote

EXE wrote:
Irish kings had to be physically perfect.


When do I start?

 
priya
986561.  Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:16 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:

Pharaohs took on a god's name as part of their own name (Amun, Aten, etc), and this might have been a way of establishing their significance as a ruler, without a further title.


Right... apparently Cleopatra (the last Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt) too considered herself a reincarnation of the goddess Isis.

 
priya
986564.  Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:27 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
EXE wrote:
Irish kings had to be physically perfect.


When do I start?


:) that's a brave statement!

Statement on Clonycavan and Old Croghan Men by Eamonn P. Kelly, keeper of Irish Antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland:

“I believe these men were failed kings or failed candidates for kingship who were killed and placed in bogs that formed important tribal boundaries. Both Clonycavan and Old Croghan men’s nipples were pinched and cut. “Sucking a king’s nipples was a gesture of submission in ancient Ireland,” says Kelly. “Cutting them would have made him incapable of kingship.”

http://archive.archaeology.org/1005/bogbodies/clonycavan_croghan.html

 
germananglophile
989362.  Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:55 pm Reply with quote

scoot wrote:
Kings and queens is a subject that could easily take up an episode on its own. Stephen dressed as Henry VIII and Alan as Richard III. The whole Richard III story is so full of Klaxon opportunities that I foresee Alan getting a record breaking minus score.


Just read that the title of the first episode to be recorded for series K is "Kings". :D
https://twitter.com/mollyoldfield/status/323758623895474176

 
djgordy
991250.  Mon Apr 22, 2013 2:52 pm Reply with quote

Fantastic. Let's just check who originated this brilliant topic...

oh, it was me.

Go me! Go me!

I hope that the body of the King of Rome has been borrowed from Derby museum for the evening.

 
germananglophile
991278.  Mon Apr 22, 2013 3:50 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
Fantastic. Let's just check who originated this brilliant topic...

oh, it was me.

Go me! Go me!

I hope that the body of the King of Rome has been borrowed from Derby museum for the evening.


Hahaha! Yay, well done you! :D As for the King of Rome you would be in a better location to check 'on site', but meanwhile here's the list of tonight's recording's panelists: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QI_(K_series)

 

Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group