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Daps

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gerontius grumpus
41994.  Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:06 pm Reply with quote

Where I was born and grew up, they are called daps.
In Yorkshire they are called pumps and in the North East they are called sand shoes. Some people call them plimsolls but I don't know if this has any connection with the Plimsoll line.

I think daps is a good name because the sound of the word is just right for what they are.

 
mckeonj
42072.  Thu Dec 29, 2005 1:40 pm Reply with quote

Irish city-dwellers call any kind of rubber shoes "tackies", which is interesting, because "takkies" is the word in South Africa's townships.

 
gruoch
42243.  Sat Dec 31, 2005 8:23 am Reply with quote

gerontious, do you come from Somerset by any chance?

 
gerontius grumpus
42300.  Sat Dec 31, 2005 6:50 pm Reply with quote

No, Gloucestershire.

Gloucester born, Gloucester bred,
Strong in the arm, thick in the head.

 
MatC
42328.  Sun Jan 01, 2006 6:23 am Reply with quote

I was born in Kent - of a West Country family - and thus was the only child in my school who knew that the correct word for gym shoes was daps. To be honest, it didn't bother me: I just assumed that the other 499 kids were all wrong, and my granny was right, and I carried on saying daps throughout my schooldays. Even so, it was a great relief to move back West, and it still pains me every time I hear the word "trainers" spoken in a Somerset accent. "They're not 'trainers,' you horrible child! You're not in Los Angeles, are you? They are gurt posh daps, that's what those are, then!"

 
samivel
42378.  Sun Jan 01, 2006 4:26 pm Reply with quote

I don't think they'd be called trainers in Los Angeles - sneakers, more likely

 
Natalie
42382.  Sun Jan 01, 2006 4:36 pm Reply with quote

Depending on what you're talking about, I, and seemingly my whole family and school class, call them plimsolls/pumps or trainers. The former are little black things with like a rubber end, and you put WHOSHOE stickers in them, and the trainers are, well, trainers.

 
Flash
42399.  Sun Jan 01, 2006 6:19 pm Reply with quote

Gym shoes.

 
MatC
42742.  Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:36 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
I don't think they'd be called trainers in Los Angeles - sneakers, more likely


Ah, well now, that’s interesting. Quite, anyway. If you look here www.getethical.com/getethical_shop.php?id=16&cat=Shoes%20and%20Trainers you’ll find a supplier of the world’s only non-slave-labour-made “sneakers.” I’m wearing a pair right now, superb they are, and the US organisation that sells them calls them sneakers. In Britain, in my childhood, they would have been called “baseball boots,” and were highly desirable: I never knew anyone who actually owned a pair. Of course, we’d never seen anyone play baseball, with or without boots, and I can only suppose the name came about because the boots were clearly too soft for cricket, and they were known to be an American style, so ... they must be for baseball. (I’ve still never seen anyone play baseball, I’m glad to say, but even so I suspect they’d need something a bit more rugged than “baseball boots.”)

The point is, they are definitely boots, in that they rise above the ankle. But if they’re called sneakers, then what are daps called?

 
djgordy
42744.  Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:44 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
in my childhood, they would have been called “baseball boots,” and were highly desirable: I never knew anyone who actually owned a pair.


I wore baseball boots for years and years. I bought a new pair in the spring and wore them til they fell apart. They'd last about 2 years so I had a new 'best' pair and an old pair on the go at the same time. They were much more comfortable than trainers, except for the fact that the soles were a lot thinner.

 
Flash
42746.  Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:46 am Reply with quote

Mat - Happy New Thing. I know you're just being provocative, but I'd like to say that I went to a baseball match once and it was rather entertaining. It is structured so as to ensure a series of mini-cliffhangers during the course of a single game, and they seem to have reached a level of precision which approaches the sublime (eg, if first base catches the ball cleanly he'll get the batter out, if he fumbles just a tiny bit he won't). By contrast, a game of cricket can last for three days without a single moment of great drama (although there may well be moments of great artistry, of course).

 
QI Individual
42768.  Tue Jan 03, 2006 6:51 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
Ah, well now, that’s interesting. Quite, anyway. If you look here www.getethical.com/getethical_shop.php?id=16&cat=Shoes%20and%20Trainers you’ll find a supplier of the world’s only non-slave-labour-made “sneakers.” I’m wearing a pair right now, superb they are, and the US organisation that sells them calls them sneakers. In Britain, in my childhood, they would have been called “baseball boots,” and were highly desirable: I never knew anyone who actually owned a pair. Of course, we’d never seen anyone play baseball, with or without boots, and I can only suppose the name came about because the boots were clearly too soft for cricket, and they were known to be an American style, so ... they must be for baseball. (I’ve still never seen anyone play baseball, I’m glad to say, but even so I suspect they’d need something a bit more rugged than “baseball boots.”)

I think 'baseball boots' is just a misnomer for 'basketball boots'. The shoes in the link are of the 'old style' basketball boots before sports footwear became a hi-tech-hi-price-hi-fashion piece of consumer bait.

 
Amie
44181.  Sun Jan 08, 2006 5:50 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
In Yorkshire they are called pumps and in the North East they are called sand shoes.


I live in bonnie yorkshire and my infant school called them sand shoes... random.

Damn you lot post too much, I was only away for two weeks, I have so much to catch up on!

 
Jenny
44201.  Sun Jan 08, 2006 7:29 pm Reply with quote

I grew up in Yorkshire, and we always called them sand shoes then.

 
gerontius grumpus
44203.  Sun Jan 08, 2006 7:34 pm Reply with quote

I should have put 'they call them pumps in South Yorkshire'.

I wonder why they call them pumps, that means farts up here.

 

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