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Wonderful letters

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CB27
891881.  Tue Mar 06, 2012 9:29 am Reply with quote

In looking up some of the Qi tweets, I came across the name "Lettersofnote" and thought I'd check the site to see what it was and was glad I did.

I'm still reading through some of the letters on the site, but the on on the link below already caught my eye and got me looking for more information, which seems to confirm the authenticity of the letter.

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html

It's sites like these that make me glad the internet was invented and that so many people can create websites to share their passions.

 
Jenny
891893.  Tue Mar 06, 2012 10:10 am Reply with quote

Thanks for that CB - a really interesting site.

 
nitwit02
891981.  Tue Mar 06, 2012 9:18 pm Reply with quote

A remarkable letter - thanks CB.

 
zomgmouse
891991.  Wed Mar 07, 2012 2:10 am Reply with quote

The guy who runs lettersofnote, Shaun Usher, also runs a couple of other websites: listsofnote and letterheady, both very interesting.

 
tetsabb
892100.  Wed Mar 07, 2012 8:41 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
In looking up some of the Qi tweets, I came across the name "Lettersofnote" and thought I'd check the site to see what it was and was glad I did.

I'm still reading through some of the letters on the site, but the on on the link below already caught my eye and got me looking for more information, which seems to confirm the authenticity of the letter.

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html

It's sites like these that make me glad the internet was invented and that so many people can create websites to share their passions.


What a polite yet eloquent way of saying "You are having a laugh -- go stick it where the sun don't shine"
I think we could all learn something from it.

 
CB27
900005.  Sun Apr 08, 2012 3:59 pm Reply with quote

Revisiting this site to highlight this letter http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/04/tale-of-peter-rabbit.html

I tend to have an image of Victorian attitudes to children which is rather stuffy, so for a 26 year old woman in 1893 to write in such a wonderful way to a little boy is really wonderful to see.

I was aware that Potter wrote many letters to children before and after she wrote, but had never seen one before, so it was a bit of a revelation.

 
Oceans Edge
900085.  Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:35 am Reply with quote

From the same's List of Note. I *love* this :)

On June 9th of 1908, as his youngest daughter, 12-year-old Elsie, prepared for a trip to London, author Rudyard Kipling wrote her a letter in which the following list of "rules for Life in London" was included.

(Source: O Beloved Kids: Rudyard Kipling's Letters to His Children)
Quote:

Dear Bird,

[...]

I send you a few simple rules for Life in London.

    1. Wash early and often with soap and hot water.
    2. Do not roll on the grass of the parks. It will come off black on your dress.
    3. Never eat penny buns, oysters, periwinkles or peppermints on the top of a bus. It annoys the passengers.
    4. Be kind to policemen. You never know when you may be taken up.
    5. Never stop a motor bus with your foot. It is not a croquet ball.
    6. Do not attempt to take pictures off the wall of the National Gallery or to remove cases of butterflies from the National History Museum. You will be noticed if you do.
    7. Avoid late hours, pickled salmon, public meetings, crowded crossings, gutters, water-carts and over-eating.

Ever your

Daddo


Sensible advice at anytime me thinks

 
monzac
900096.  Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:07 am Reply with quote

This may not have been a written reply, but it is a wonderful response.
Quote:
In June 1744, the College of William & Mary invited the Indians of the Six Nations to send six young men to be “properly” educated. They received this reply:

'We know that you highly esteem the kind of learning taught in those Colleges, and that the Maintenance of our young Men, while with you, would be very expensive to you. We are convinc’d, therefore, that you mean to do us Good by your Proposal; and we thank you heartily. But you, who are wise, must know that different Nations have different Conceptions of Things; and you will therefore not take it amiss if our Ideas of this kind of Education happen not to be the same with yours. We have had some Experience of it: Several of our young People were formerly brought up at the Colleges of the Northern Provinces; they were instructed in all your Sciences; but when they came back to us, they were bad Runners, ignorant of every means of living in the Woods, unable to bear either Cold or Hunger, knew neither how to build a Cabin, take a Deer, or kill an Enemy, spoke our Language imperfectly, were therefore neither fit for Hunters, Warriors, or Counsellors; they were totally good for nothing. We are, however, not the less oblig’d by your kind Offer, tho’ we decline accepting it; and, to show our grateful Sense of it, if the Gentlemen of Virginia will send us a Dozen of their Sons, we will take great Care of their Education, instruct them in all we know, and make Men of them.'


Found here http://www.futilitycloset.com/2012/01/31/no-thanks/, quoted in Biography and History of the Indians of North America, Samuel G. Drake (editor), 2nd edition, Boston, 1834.

 
Jenny
900192.  Mon Apr 09, 2012 11:56 am Reply with quote

I don't know if that's actually genuine, but I love it just the same.

 
CB27
900205.  Mon Apr 09, 2012 12:37 pm Reply with quote

I have to admit I also have doubts about it being genuine, it is a wonderful read though :)

 

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