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cherrycoke
896171.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 1:16 am Reply with quote

James Cameron is the deepest man on earth

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/120325-james-cameron-mariana-trench-challenger-deep-deepest-science-sub/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17503395

 
djgordy
896173.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:07 am Reply with quote

That is a really cool thing to do. Now we know why he made "The Abyss" and "Titanic". If I were ever to have enough money I would take myself down to see the black smokers, vents which spew hot water heated by geothermal energy, into the sea and create their own ecosystems.


Last edited by djgordy on Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:51 am; edited 1 time in total

 
AlmondFacialBar
896175.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:24 am Reply with quote

Ditto, that must be incredible!

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
cherrycoke
896177.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:43 am Reply with quote

Can't wait for the documentary. In 3D. On Imax. Starring Leo DiCaprio and a large CGI SmurfCat. In two parts.


I wonder if he saw any flying piranha down there...

 
tetsabb
896185.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 4:28 am Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
If I were ever to have enough money I would take myself down to see the black smokers, vents which spew hot water heated by geothermal energy, into the sea and create their own ecosystems.

Any room in your submersible for a passenger?
As I understand it, the water comes out of the vents at near-boiling, and merges with water that is barely above freezing, and at extreme pressure. And yet life still thrives in what should be almost unbearable conditions.
When you consider the other organisms that get on in highly acidic lakes and other extreme conditions, it does appear that, given half a chance, life will grab it with both hands/pseudopodia/tentacles and make the most of it. And this just on the one planet.
Trip to Europa, anyone?

 
AlmondFacialBar
896191.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 4:34 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
djgordy wrote:
If I were ever to have enough money I would take myself down to see the black smokers, vents which spew hot water heated by geothermal energy, into the sea and create their own ecosystems.

Any room in your submersible for a passenger?
As I understand it, the water comes out of the vents at near-boiling, and merges with water that is barely above freezing, and at extreme pressure. And yet life still thrives in what should be almost unbearable conditions.
When you consider the other organisms that get on in highly acidic lakes and other extreme conditions, it does appear that, given half a chance, life will grab it with both hands/pseudopodia/tentacles and make the most of it. And this just on the one planet.
Trip to Europa, anyone?


Window seat, please, and not too near the engines! Oh, and may I leave my mobile on? I'm bound to forget my camera, I always do on such occasions!

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
soup
896225.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 5:47 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
the water comes out of the vents at near-boiling,


Underselling it a bit there, yes the "water" can be at near boiling but the "water" out of vents can be anything from 60C to 464C

 
Starfish13
896251.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 7:11 am Reply with quote

cherrycoke wrote:
Can't wait for the documentary. In 3D. On Imax. Starring Leo DiCaprio and a large CGI SmurfCat. In two parts.


I wonder if he saw any flying piranha down there...


like! Piranha 2 is an awesome film.

Can't wait to see what he's found.

 
djgordy
896260.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 7:41 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:

Any room in your submersible for a passenger?
As I understand it, the water comes out of the vents at near-boiling, and merges with water that is barely above freezing, and at extreme pressure. And yet life still thrives in what should be almost unbearable conditions.
When you consider the other organisms that get on in highly acidic lakes and other extreme conditions, it does appear that, given half a chance, life will grab it with both hands/pseudopodia/tentacles and make the most of it. And this just on the one planet.


Yes, and they were only discovered in 1977; five years after the final Apollo mission to the Moon. It may be argued that their discovery has opned our eyes more to the possibilities of life on other planets than landing people on the Moon ever did.

 
AlmondFacialBar
896263.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 7:51 am Reply with quote

I was the in first year in my school whose biology textbook discussed such lifeforms, and also five kingdom taxonomy. Interestingly enough, however, our teacher did not...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
CB27
896379.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:04 pm Reply with quote

cherrycoke wrote:
James Cameron is the deepest man on earth

Only because Barry White is no more.

 
Leith
896401.  Mon Mar 26, 2012 5:11 pm Reply with quote

Now that's a proper adventure! I remember being quite fascinated by the Trieste as a kid and it's remarkable to think that no-one has repeated that expedition until now. Really looking forward to the documentary.

 
djgordy
896429.  Tue Mar 27, 2012 2:43 am Reply with quote

That's because, until recently, more or less as I said earlier, the deep sea was of very little interest because people though of these reagions as vast, flat abyssal plains that sustained little or no life. It is also a lot more difficult to explore because you can't look at these places from far away and the problems of pressure are a lot worse than they are in space. The difference in pressure between the inside of a space ship and the outside is one atmosphere. The diffference in pressure between the inside and outside of a submersible in the ocean depths is 1,000 atmospheres.

 
cherrycoke
896433.  Tue Mar 27, 2012 3:11 am Reply with quote

"Hmmm, maybe we shouldn't go there. It's really difficult" - No explorer, ever.

 
Leith
896632.  Tue Mar 27, 2012 6:22 pm Reply with quote

First reports, describing a desolate landscape, some limited success in sample collection (inhibited by a hydraulics failure) but plans for further dives:

Nat. Geographic: James Cameron on Earth's Deepest Spot: Desolate, Lunar-Like

djgordy wrote:
That's because, until recently, more or less as I said earlier, the deep sea was of very little interest because people though of these reagions as vast, flat abyssal plains that sustained little or no life.

That never stopped people visiting Lincolnshire.

djgordy wrote:
It is also a lot more difficult to explore because you can't look at these places from far away and the problems of pressure are a lot worse than they are in space. The difference in pressure between the inside of a space ship and the outside is one atmosphere. The diffference in pressure between the inside and outside of a submersible in the ocean depths is 1,000 atmospheres.

Some interesting engineering challenges, for sure. Modules for the International Space Station, for example, get tested in giant vacuum chambers, but I don't think you could do an equivalent pressure test for this sort of expedition. Sounds like the speed of Cameron's dive required the sub to handle some pretty rapid temperature changes, too, though I guess it will at least have been spared the kind of launch stresses and radiation exposure that spacecraft typically have to tolerate.

 

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