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London Mayoral Election

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'yorz
903176.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:02 am Reply with quote

Since I got here (1994) I've NEVER had anybody darkening my doorstep for ANY party. I know I live outside the metropolis that is Haltwhistle, but you'd expect somebody canvassing at least once every decennium

 
suze
903205.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 11:16 am Reply with quote

Certainly when there's a general election you would; in most of the country canvassing for local elections seems to have died a bit of a death. (For which the reason is simple - the parties can't find the people to do it.)

Rochester where I live divides quite sharply into two. Rochester East votes solidly Labour, while Rochester West votes solidly Conservative - and if you were to walk around the two wards, it wouldn't take you long to guess at that being so.

In both wards, it's only ever Labour who canvass. The LibDems were utterly disorganized locally even before they split into two parties over a local issue, so it's no great surprise that they campaign scarcely at all.

But I don't really know why the Tories don't bother - is it just because they know they're going to win one ward and lose the other, and see no reason to spend money on not changing that? (And if it is that, why do Labour canvass in both the wards?)

 
CB27
903221.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 12:06 pm Reply with quote

In the area between Edgware and Hendon (which includes Burnt Oak, Colindale, and Mill Hill to the east) you get quite heavy canvassing from Labour at every election, but that's because there was a large movement to back the Labour councillors and candidates to stop the closure of Edgware hospital and the fact that it part succeeded (the A&E is gone, but other services stayed) means that quite a few people continued to volunteer compared to the rest of the borough and other nearby boroughs.

Conservative canvassers only seem to hit the wards where they tend to win anyway (so Edgware, Hendon, Barnet, but not the rest), and I don't remember the last time I saw a Lib Dem around here. I can only think the BNP keep campaigning here because there are some "poor" areas, and there's been a massive growth of non white residents in the area. The problem with that view of course is that there's been a massive investment in housing in the area (the first public-private funding partnership in the UK started here a decade ago), which means that businesses in the area are kept busy and the are doesn't look/feel deprived like other areas, and the growth of "foreign" population is mostly commuter middle class, so they actually bring in investment (shame about the closure of Oriental City though). Still, if it wastes the BNP's money, I don't mind :)

 
CB27
903222.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 12:12 pm Reply with quote

I have to admit it seems a shame that people keep claiming to be disenchanted with the main parties, but forget that local politics is heavily influenced by local people, and that local representatives have an impact on national party conferences, which can affect policy. By joining in and finding someone (or some people) you feel best represent you, you can do more to ensure they win, and that gives your views a better chance to then be represented within that party.

 
PDR
903263.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:26 pm Reply with quote

exnihilo wrote:
And the people who didn't vote for them, surely?


I couldn't agree more. This is one of the core values of the PDR party - we feel very strongly that those who vote for other parties should be treated with kindness.

And as they are obviously brain-dead what could be kinder or more compassionate than painless euthenasia? This would lead to an even greater popular mandate at successive elections as well...

PDR

 
'yorz
903266.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 6:32 pm Reply with quote

You're playing with fire, PDR. We're in the wee small hours of the morning now...

 
suze
903268.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:07 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
I can only think the BNP keep campaigning here because there are some "poor" areas, and there's been a massive growth of non white residents in the area.


Now there's a thing. All the large towns in the UK have some not especially affluent but predominantly white areas, and those are the areas where the BNP looks for much of its support.

Medway is no exception, and in fact Rochester East "ought" to be promising territory for the BNP. There's a fairly substantial Bengali community in half a dozen streets at one end of the ward, but otherwise it's predominantly white, working class, and not young. And yet the BNP has never been active in the area. I'm certainly not complaining about this, but from their point of view it might be a missed opportunity.


CB27 wrote:
I have to admit it seems a shame that people keep claiming to be disenchanted with the main parties, but forget that local politics is heavily influenced by local people.


Where I live at least, the two main local parties actively distance themselves from the parliamentary parties on some issues. The local Labour Party uses words like "socialist" and means them, and was very critical of the Blair government on a number of occasions (Iraq was the obvious but by no means the only one). Bob Marshall-Andrews believes that this is why he retained his seat in 2005 against most expectations.

As for the local Conservatives, their last local election campaign had a lot about grammar schools, a lot about leaving the EU, and a lot of opposition to government spending plans.

Is this the same everywhere, or is it just part of the well-established understanding that Kent is a maverick county and national politicians are wise not to get involved?

 
CB27
903269.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:30 pm Reply with quote

I can't speak for other parties, but a few of the selection meetings I've been to in local Labour parties (I've acted as outside observer a few times) show how local issues tend to dominate. It helps to show a popular side which in recent years has been anti parliamentary, but I remember one candidate one time who pitched his nomination based on the fact he marched against the war, was against this and that which the Labour Government was unpopular for, etc, but never once mentioned anything about local issues. He didn't get a single nomination and accused the committee of being right wing, which was a bit laughable.

 
CB27
903271.  Fri Apr 20, 2012 7:33 pm Reply with quote

BTW, I see the various candidates are playing Billiy No Mates with the BNP for one of the debates.

On the one hand I say it's a shame that there isn't an opportunity to show the BNP up, but then again the mayoral debates this time round have been about as meaningful and inciteful as PMQ...

 
CB27
904104.  Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:01 am Reply with quote

As I've been suffering from a nasty stomach bug for the last 4 days I'm just catching up with different news on matters that interest me and when I went to have a look at the BBC London 2012 Vote section I found this piece:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17790176

I have to admit I'm surprised that Portillo isn't behind Boris. I do agree with MP in that I supported the third runway because I thought it was necessary and I was annoyed that all the main parties were against it, but the only candidate who has actively called for the 3rd runway is Siobhan Benita, and while I'm not in total disagreement with all her policies, they are much grander in total than anything offered by most of the others (without the costs shown) and her background is too much of a "Sir Humphrey" to my liking to trust her to run the show. I find it interesting that MP might consider voting for her.

 
Neotenic
904117.  Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:33 am Reply with quote

One of the local Labour candidates actually knocked on my door last night. That was a first.

I was fairly candid, and said that voting Tory in Tottenham was a bit like pissing in the wind, but one had to vote with one's beliefs.

She didn't really try to change my mind, least of all about my declared preference for Boris. But she seemed quite personable.

 
Moosh
904122.  Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:09 am Reply with quote

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17790176
Quote:
Asked whether he wanted to give his endorsement to Mr Johnson for a second term as mayor, Mr Portillo replied: "No. [...]"

Asked whether that meant he wouldn't be voting for Mr Johnson, he answered: "Yes."

Amazing, it turns out once they lose the letters "MP" after their name, politicians are in fact capable of giving straight answers.

 
Neotenic
904129.  Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:38 am Reply with quote

Lest I get accused of favoritism, I would just like to point out that I think this is a rubbish poster;



But, in their usual splendidly histrionic fashion, RMT have announced they are going to sue Boris for defamation over the inclusion of Blob Crow's name.

Of course the whole thing is completely bizarre, not least because I certainly can't remember a time when Bob and Ken were, like, BFF. And, naturally, Bob is going to be part of the political landscape of London no matter who wins in May.

I do think, however, the record shows that whether or not Bob has caused 'serious harm' to the people of London, he doesn't especially give a fuck about the people of London unless they happen to have a tube logo on their jacket. And he certainly gives precedence to making sure that his particularly well-paid members continue to be increasingly well-paid, even if that means those earning dramatically less having to pay more and more for their monthly travelcards. So suing Boris is quite, quite peculiar.

Should that tawdry poster have been published? Almost certainly not. However, I can't help but think that Bob & Co standing up in their collective pram and chucking their rattles on the floor just gives it a whole heap of free publicity, and all the London press (none of whom seem to be welcoming Ken with open arms) an excuse to prominently run what is effectively an advert at no cost to Team Boris.

Good work, comrades.


Last edited by Neotenic on Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:50 am; edited 1 time in total

 
CB27
904131.  Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:41 am Reply with quote

Speaking of the mayoral election, I've been avoiding TV and radio for a few days because I've been laid up with a nasty stomach bug which left me very dizzy and not able to stand much noise and light, so I only caught the debate on ITV, so wanted to know if the other televised debates were similar?

I ask because my impression of the debate was that nothing new was given by any of the candidates, and my impression of the performances were thus:

Jenny Jones came across as someone who didn't have leadership qualities and was nearly bouncing up and down with joy when an audience member mentioned she was her first choice. Couldn't help thinking that despite her previous experience she seemed green (pun firmly intended).

Brian Paddick mentioned some of the positive ideas from his manifesto, but was not questioned on others. He thrived on insinuating that other candidates used "his" good ideas when they were in agreement, and kept going on and on about how super he was when serving in the police.

Ken Livingstone concentrated a little too much on sparring with Boris, and let the other two off the hook, especially Brian, and didn't get to actually talk about his ideas in the end.

Boris Johnson also failed to talk about his ideas much, but spent much of the debate blundering onto other candidates' time which personally made me cringe. The highlight was when he continued to talk when it was Brian's turn, even after the host tried to stop him, so Ken stepped in to tell him to stop stealing Brian's time, only for Boris to start blustering at Ken to stop talking over Brian's turn. It was a bit like "no you shut up, no you shut up...".

The audience were mostly pretty decent in their questions and reactions, but I found the format and hosting a little overly rushed and uncontrolled, and not enough poking for the answers.

 
Strawberry
904140.  Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:54 am Reply with quote

Neotenic wrote:
One of the local Labour candidates actually knocked on my door last night. That was a first.

I was fairly candid, and said that voting Tory in Tottenham was a bit like pissing in the wind, but one had to vote with one's beliefs.

She didn't really try to change my mind, least of all about my declared preference for Boris. But she seemed quite personable.


Youlgreave- i read personable as desirable.

 

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