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Puzzling/Nonsensical expressions.

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RLDavies
1324905.  Fri Jun 21, 2019 11:09 am Reply with quote

That one's very guarded, isn't it? The gay young clerk is certainly "not the marrying kind", but you can take that any way you prefer.

I dare say the interpretation all depends on the way you sing it.

 
Jenny
1324935.  Fri Jun 21, 2019 3:38 pm Reply with quote

A guy I used to know (alas, dead now - which was a pity as although we were only online friends we corresponded and I liked him a lot) described himself as 'not the marrying kind' with definitely the meaning of 'gay'. He lived in Tennessee, which is Dixie country, so I wonder if that phrase with that meaning has lingered longer there. The southern states generally don't have the reputation of being gay-friendly.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1324951.  Fri Jun 21, 2019 6:28 pm Reply with quote

I wonder if the evolution of the word 'gay' from 'happy, merry' to homosexual had anything to do with the public-school expression 'to act the gay dog' meaning to disobey the rules, cause trouble or generally rebel against the system in any way?

 
crissdee
1324964.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 3:24 am Reply with quote

The last Ripper victim, Mary Kelly, was said to have lived in a "gay" house in Paris for some time before her descent into Whitechapel. I don't think they meant it was just a happy place to be..........

 
Awitt
1324967.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 3:51 am Reply with quote

Wikipedia I know, but this explains the basic history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay

 
AlmondFacialBar
1324978.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 4:53 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
A guy I used to know (alas, dead now - which was a pity as although we were only online friends we corresponded and I liked him a lot) described himself as 'not the marrying kind' with definitely the meaning of 'gay'. He lived in Tennessee, which is Dixie country, so I wonder if that phrase with that meaning has lingered longer there. The southern states generally don't have the reputation of being gay-friendly.


Which reminds me of one of my favourite cookbooks, a German classic from the early 1960s that also teaches basic home economics and party planning, basically the whole nuts and bolts of running a household, and dazzles modern sensibilities in many interesting and educational ways. It has a section about seating guests at a formal dinner, most senior guest to the right of the wife, second most senior guest's wife to the left of the husband, married couples across from each other, engaged couples next to each other, reserve the ends of the table for single men. Couples not in formal relationship arrangements, same sex couples, and single women didn't exist, perhaps unsurprisingly given the book's vintage.

Once upon a time I was remarking to my dad that while there are many reasons to cherish the book that section wasn't one of them because thank goodness formal dinners don't work that way anymore, like for instance where would you seat gay men. So he's like: "Oh, but they're there. They're the 'single men' at the ends of the table." Hm... I guess at least letting those possibly in a relationship face each other across two miles of table at least meant acknowledging their existence, back in the not quite dim and distant enough days of §175. Mind, still fuck women, right? 🙄

It also makes me wonder about an old friend of mine. His husband is a senior diplomat in a famously liberal Anerican city and to me it looks like nowadays diplomatic functions are pretty much the only ones left where formal etiquette is still fully enforced. In the city where they live they're embraced as a couple by the authorities and seated accordingly, but what would happen in more bigoted areas of the US? Would they be the 'single men' at separate ends of the table? Would there be strings pulled in the background to make sure the situation wouldn't arise in the first place, i.e. they wouldn't be invited or somehow prevented from attending in a manner that doesn't make anyone lose face? The promotion of global LGBT equality is an explicit objective of Irish foreign policy, but would that be enforced on the ground when, say, the CEO of *insert famously anti-LGBT company here* hosted a function with a view to bringing yet more FDI jobs here? It's one thing that Mike Pence hosted An Taoiseach and his fella for breakfast (ingenious for not requiring quite the same formality of seating arrangements as other meals) in full view of the world's news media, it's quite a different thing if the mayor of Trailer Park Junction, Tex-Ass, is trying to woo the town's Irish diaspora by hosting a Paddy's Day dinner with no-one watching but the local affiliate of Faux News.

I'm not gonna ask my friend any of that because they did experience instutional discrimination in the early days of his hubby's posting before Obergefell vs. Hodges and of course are living the life of gay men in Trump's America (if on the highly privileged end of the spectrum), so I figure me poking around his brain in that regard is something his mental health can completely do without, but still, it's the occasions that arise in everyday life away from the cameras like those where subtle discrimination flowers.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
GuyBarry
1324985.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 5:25 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
So he's like:


Gosh, is "yoof-speak" infiltrating the forum?

 
AlmondFacialBar
1324986.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 5:34 am Reply with quote

If you feel inclined to consider an idiom that I adopted in my early twenties when Kurt Cobain still walked among us and that's been around for considerably longer than that yoof speak, yes. I don't think today's youth speaks that way, though, and it might just be indicative of how we feel about ourselves as a generation that you still choose to call it that.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
GuyBarry
1325012.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 11:31 am Reply with quote

Oh, is "I'm like/he's like" now passé, then? I didn't realize. I thought it belonged to the generation who use "gay" to mean "useless".

 
AlmondFacialBar
1325014.  Sat Jun 22, 2019 11:41 am Reply with quote

I don't think it does. Not that I spend much time hanging out with people who use gay as an insult, mind. The teenagers and 20-somethings in my life are generally more articulate, thank fuck!

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Jenny
1325691.  Mon Jul 01, 2019 9:05 am Reply with quote

I am not well today - possibly have a flare-up of the diverticulitis I had a couple of years ago.

I said to Woodsman that I was feeling 'under par', and he pointed out to me that in golf, a round played under par is a good round.

We wondered how it got applied to somebody feeling less than well.

 
Efros
1325694.  Mon Jul 01, 2019 9:27 am Reply with quote

Nothing to do with golf apparently

https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/below-par.html

 
Jenny
1325726.  Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:28 pm Reply with quote

I don't think anybody would want to insure me right now.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1343076.  Wed Feb 26, 2020 6:30 am Reply with quote

In German, when applying generous amounts of flattery to a person for probably selfish purposes, we "brush their tummy" (bauchpinseln). Anyone? 🤔

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
tetsabb
1343090.  Wed Feb 26, 2020 12:27 pm Reply with quote

Foreplay, innit?
😉

 

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