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Puzzling/Nonsensical expressions.

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Strawberry
901331.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 3:31 am Reply with quote

filofax wrote:
Quote:
What about the Scots word malinky? Usually always used in connection with skinny, as in skinny malinky long-legs, big banana feet.


I was taught
skinny malinky long-legs, umbarella feet
went tae the pictures and couldnae get a seat.

Can't remember the rest of it. Anyone?


i found it on a cycling forum and tried to post a link but the link didn't work so i wrote down the poem.

Skinny Malinky long legs, umbrella feet
Went to the pictures and couldnae find a seat
When the picture started
Skinny Malinky farted
When the picture ended
Skinny Malinky fented.

 
swot
901346.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:37 am Reply with quote

What's 'fented'?

 
'yorz
901347.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:38 am Reply with quote

Fainted?

 
swot
901348.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:39 am Reply with quote

Can't type apparently.


Last edited by swot on Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:40 am; edited 1 time in total

 
swot
901349.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:39 am Reply with quote

Ah, didn't think of that. That makes sense.

 
'yorz
901350.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:40 am Reply with quote

In both senses?
Ah - just in the one sense then :p

 
Ameena
901356.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:51 am Reply with quote

Slinky Malinki is also a black cat from the "Hairy Maclary" series of books by Lynley Dodd ;).

 
Starfish13
901358.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:01 am Reply with quote

skinny malinky long legs
big banana feet
went tae the pictures
couldnae find a seat
when the pictures started
skinny malinky farted
skinny malinky long legs
big banana feet

There is no sense to it. At all. Just like...

Not last night, but the night afore
Three wee monkeys came to my door
One with a whistle
One with a drum
One with a pancake
Stuck to its bum

 
filofax
901364.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:15 am Reply with quote

I very much like the monkey thing, and I will be telling it to my son at the first opportunity. It cannot fail to appeal to a 12 year old sense of humour.

 
mckeonj
901365.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:15 am Reply with quote

Oddly, and I'm sure suze can explain it, the Russian word for 'little' is 'malenky'.

 
strukkanurv
901368.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:20 am Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
There is no sense to it. At all. Just like...

Not last night, but the night afore
Three wee monkeys came to my door
One with a whistle
One with a drum
One with a pancake
Stuck to its bum


Reminds me of...

One fine day in the middle of the night
Two dead men got up to fight
Back to back, they faced eachother
Drew their swords & shot eachother

 
suze
901395.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:02 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
Oddly, and I'm sure suze can explain it, the Russian word for 'little' is 'malenky'.


Ah yes indeed, маленький, which clearly comes from the same source as Polish mały, Czech malư, and similar in the other Slavic languages.

Slavic etymological dictionaries reckon that the word is derived from Greek via Lithuanian, and note that it has lost an initial s- which has been retained in German schmal (narrow) and in English small.

I suppose the Scots malinky just could be a borrowing from Russian, but it's hard to see how this could have happened without England also adopting the word. In any case, borrowings from Russian into English were few indeed before the C20. Bridge (the card game, perhaps based loosely on a Russian game called бирич), mammoth (originally from Yakut), sable (from Old Persian), and that's about your lot.

 
NinOfEden
901408.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:51 am Reply with quote

strukkanurv wrote:

One fine day in the middle of the night
Two dead men got up to fight
Back to back, they faced eachother
Drew their swords & shot eachother

I stand before you to stand behind you
To tell you something I know nothing about.

Admission is free, pay at the door
Bring your own seat, sit on the floor.

It was Christmas day at the workhouse,
The snow was raining fast.
A barefooted boy with clogs on
Stood sitting on the grass.

 
cornixt
901472.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 10:15 am Reply with quote

Jelly on the plate
Jelly on the plate
Wibble wobble
Wibble wobble
Jelly on the plate

 
swot
901473.  Fri Apr 13, 2012 10:16 am Reply with quote

That was a skipping rhyme.

The next verse (at least in my Guide troop) was:

Something on the floor
Something on the floor
Pick it up
Pick it up
Something on the floor

 

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