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Largest waterfall on earth

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Theodk
893469.  Tue Mar 13, 2012 2:54 pm Reply with quote

This has perhaps already been posted, but just in case:

Contrary to what is believed by many, the Earth's largest waterfall is neither the Angel Falls in Venezuela nor the Niagra falls, but rather a large cataract beneath the Denmark Strait between Greenland and Iceland. Dropping nearly 11.500 feet, this waterfall is more than three times larger than the Angel Falls at 3,212 feet.

 
bobwilson
893525.  Tue Mar 13, 2012 9:01 pm Reply with quote

This needs some explanation - if it's in the Denmark Strait then it would appear to be underwater.

 
Theodk
893552.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 4:03 am Reply with quote

"The earth’s oceans are always in motion, and while tides and currents crash against the coasts, huge cataracts fall for miles within the deep waterfalls on the surface. Seven major cataracts have been found deep below the ocean surface. Most are caused by temperature differences between separate ocean basins. For instance, heavy, cold water at the North and South Poles sinks to the seafloor, where it sweeps along the undersea terrain. It flows downhill, deeper and deeper, until the river finally plunges over into an adjacent ocean basin.

The largest cataract exists beneath the Denmark Strait between Greenland and Iceland. This underwater waterfall drops nearly 11,500 feet, more than three times Venezuela’s Angel Falls, the earth’s highest waterfall at 3,212 feet. The submarine waterfall carries at least 175 million cubic feet of water per second, making it 350 times as voluminous as Guaira Falls on the border of Brazil and Paraguay which was once considered to carry more water than any other waterfall on the earth’s surface."

 
Theodk
893556.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 4:11 am Reply with quote

And here a picture from the book Invitation to Oceanography by Paul R. Pinet:

 
CB27
893635.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 8:04 am Reply with quote

It's certainly in the spirit of Qi.

 
Starfish13
893661.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:09 am Reply with quote

The sinking of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is the "driver" for the conveyor model of ocean thermohaline circulation. Waterbodies of different salinity and temperature (and consequently, density*) are rather immiscible, and tent to stratify. The cold, salty water of NADW sinks in the Denmark Strait and Labrador Sea, pulling the warm water of the North Atlantic Drift (the extention of the Gulf Stream in to the North Atlantic) northwards on the surface along the fringes of northern Europe, and giving places like Ireland, Scotland and Iceland their mild maritime climates in comparison to other locations at a similar latitude.

*Seawater, unlike freshwater, doesn't have a density maximum at 4degrees C, and continues to get denser until freezing at -1.8degrees C or so.

 
Janet H
893730.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:12 pm Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
...............*Seawater, unlike freshwater, doesn't have a density maximum at 4degrees C, and continues to get denser until freezing at -1.8degrees C or so.


Stone me!

And the idea of a waterfall within water is a whole new concept - Thank you folks!

 
brunel
893738.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:38 pm Reply with quote

Janet H wrote:
Starfish13 wrote:
...............*Seawater, unlike freshwater, doesn't have a density maximum at 4degrees C, and continues to get denser until freezing at -1.8degrees C or so.


Stone me!

And the idea of a waterfall within water is a whole new concept - Thank you folks!

Similarly, you can also have waves forming at the boundary between two layers of a liquid (it is effectively the same as having waves forming on the sea surface).
In fact, the formation of "internal waves" has caused some problems for oil exploration to the west of the Shetland Islands as they can subject production risers to loads that are quite a bit higher than expected (not to mention potential premature fatigue failures).

 
Sadurian Mike
893739.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:39 pm Reply with quote

Janet H wrote:
Stone me!

Please don't take this literally. She bruises very easily.

 
Strawberry
893741.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:42 pm Reply with quote

Or maybe Janet wanted some drugs.

 
Sadurian Mike
893742.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:45 pm Reply with quote

Meh. I have that effect on the women in my life.

 
CB27
893762.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 3:40 pm Reply with quote

The differences in density and temperature of different waters, as well as other factors, allow for some incredible phenomena, such as the Meeting of Waters in Brazil:

http://youtu.be/0q_zr2FESVU

 
Starfish13
893778.  Wed Mar 14, 2012 4:26 pm Reply with quote

Indeed. The freshwater outflow of the Amazon (which is something like 2 x 10 to power5 cumex (cubic metres/second) at its peak flow) is still detectable as distinct from seawater by the time it reaches Barbados, around 1600km away.

 
jayh121
951772.  Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:17 am Reply with quote

That is unbelieveable. I always thought Niagra or Angel was the biggest. I can't wait to get this in a pub quiz haha.



_________________________
"If you can dream it....you can do it."


Last edited by jayh121 on Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:16 am; edited 1 time in total

 
'yorz
951776.  Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:32 am Reply with quote

jayh121 wrote:
"If you can dream it....you can do it."

That would be awesome - me tearing through a department store crammed into a self-propelled glass suitcase.

Yes - one of my bizarre dreams.

 

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