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Series J - suggest possible Generally Ignorance questions?

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Sadurian Mike
895584.  Thu Mar 22, 2012 4:41 pm Reply with quote

You're quite right, the Germans did have radar, but they hadn't put such emphasis on it pre-war. The result was that they did not start the war with an integrated radar-fighter-AAA defence as did Britain.

One difference was that the Germans were developing a higher frequency system. When they detected the low-frequency emissions from Britain's Chain Home they didn't think it was a radar system because it didn't look like their own radar. A rather costly mistake in hindsight.

It was the later installation of radar into night fighters that was the big secret, though. Britain's early low-frequency radar wasn't actually very good for tracking individual aircraft as it struggled to get an exact fix. Later, they increased the frequency and developed microwave radar which could be fitted to large fighters (such as the Beaufighter). This gave night fighters the ability to fix the positions of enemy aircraft and attack them, instead of potentially fruitless searches solely guided by ground-based radar.

Interestingly, the success of upwards-firing cannon as seen in the German night fighters' 'Jazz' system, owed a lot to the British bombers being fitted with H2S navigation radar to improve bombing accuracy. The radar was usually fitted to the point in the aircraft where a ventral turret might otherwise have sat. This meant that British bombers had no turret or defense underneath - exactly the place that the 'Jazz' system attacked.

 
krollo
900942.  Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:21 pm Reply with quote

I've been working through 'J' topics alphabetically and have come up with the following:

When did punched-card computers become popular?
1804, not the 1960s - the popular Jacquard loom of 1804 used a punched-card system for producing different styles of weave similar to those of the 1960s.

How many people should drive a juggernaut?
4,000, not 1 - the etymology leads to an Indian festival where the god Jaganath is pulled through the town by up to 4000 men.

What colour is a jaguar?
Darkish-yellow with black spots, not black - erm, little else to say here. I'm pretty sure most people thing jaguars are black.

How did Jesse James die?
At home, not in a fight - as this says, he was shot in the back of the head whilst adjusting a picture.

Chinese jade comes from which country?
Either Canada or California, depending on the source - Canada for nephrite and California for jadeite. China has relatively small jade resources.

What are jack-o-lanterns traditionally made of?
Beetroots (?), cabbages or turnips, traditional in England, Scotland and Ireland respectively - the pumpkin was an American innovation.

Whose core value is not killing anything and often walk around in the nude?
Digambara Jainists, not hippies - a great schism occurred in Jainism which resulted in Digambara Jainists (nude) and Svetambara Jainists (white-robed).

Let me know how good these are.

 
krollo
900947.  Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:55 pm Reply with quote

What was the first 'talkie' movie?
The Lights of New York, not the Jazz Singer - this is now said to be just a silent film with a Vitaphone score.

Where should you go to make the day as short as possible?
Jupiter, not (the poles/somewhere fun/etc.), where days last 9 hours and 55 minutes.

 
JamesB
900968.  Wed Apr 11, 2012 5:32 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
You're quite right, the Germans did have radar, but they hadn't put such emphasis on it pre-war. The result was that they did not start the war with an integrated radar-fighter-AAA defence as did Britain.

One difference was that the Germans were developing a higher frequency system. When they detected the low-frequency emissions from Britain's Chain Home they didn't think it was a radar system because it didn't look like their own radar. A rather costly mistake in hindsight.

It was the later installation of radar into night fighters that was the big secret, though. Britain's early low-frequency radar wasn't actually very good for tracking individual aircraft as it struggled to get an exact fix. Later, they increased the frequency and developed microwave radar which could be fitted to large fighters (such as the Beaufighter). This gave night fighters the ability to fix the positions of enemy aircraft and attack them, instead of potentially fruitless searches solely guided by ground-based radar.

Interestingly, the success of upwards-firing cannon as seen in the German night fighters' 'Jazz' system, owed a lot to the British bombers being fitted with H2S navigation radar to improve bombing accuracy. The radar was usually fitted to the point in the aircraft where a ventral turret might otherwise have sat. This meant that British bombers had no turret or defense underneath - exactly the place that the 'Jazz' system attacked.

I used to teach RADAR, and I would run the second episode ("To See For a Hundred Miles") of the 1977 BBC series "The Secret War" as an introduction to RADAR video.

The series has never been released on DVD (we bought a copy of episodes 1 and 2 on VHS for use in the school) and a VHS rip of the entire series can be found on YouTube if you do a search.

 
Efros
901003.  Wed Apr 11, 2012 6:58 pm Reply with quote

bloody good it is too, as is the rest of the series. William Woollard was the perfect choice as presenter/narrator.

 
Sadurian Mike
901036.  Thu Apr 12, 2012 4:21 am Reply with quote

krollo wrote:
How many people should drive a juggernaut?
4,000, not 1 - the etymology leads to an Indian festival where the god Jaganath is pulled through the town by up to 4000 men.

I like that one.

krollo wrote:
What colour is a jaguar?
Darkish-yellow with black spots, not black - erm, little else to say here. I'm pretty sure most people thing jaguars are black.

I would think that most people know that jaguars look like leopards - yellow with black patched. The all-black jaguar is generally called a black panther and I'm fairly sure that it is commonly known to be rare.

 
krollo
901146.  Thu Apr 12, 2012 9:43 am Reply with quote

[quote="Sadurian Mike"]
krollo wrote:

krollo wrote:
What colour is a jaguar?
Darkish-yellow with black spots, not black - erm, little else to say here. I'm pretty sure most people thing jaguars are black.

I would think that most people know that jaguars look like leopards - yellow with black patched. The all-black jaguar is generally called a black panther and I'm fairly sure that it is commonly known to be rare.

I shall conduct a survey.

 
JohnSmith
902436.  Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:42 pm Reply with quote

krollo wrote:
What was the first 'talkie' movie?
The Lights of New York, not the Jazz Singer - this is now said to be just a silent film with a Vitaphone score.


Just because the technology used for the speech wasn't as advanced as the technology used by later films, in what sense does that mean it wasn't a 'talkie'? That seems like quibbling over petty definitions. Indeed, all depending on definitions, there are considerably earlier contenders than 'the Jazz Singer' for the title of the first talking movie, which is rather more interesting.

"The Photo-Drama of Creation (aka the Eureka-Drama in its abbreviated version), a 1912 religious production by Charles Taze Russell through the auspices of the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society (representing the Bible Student Movement), was the first major screenplay which incorporated synchronized sound (recorded speech), moving film, and magic lantern color slides."
http://www.filmsite.org/1914-filmhistory.html

 
plinkplonk
907838.  Tue May 08, 2012 7:42 am Reply with quote

[quote="JohnSmith"]
krollo wrote:
What was the first 'talkie' movie?
"The Photo-Drama of Creation (aka the Eureka-Drama in its abbreviated version), a 1912 religious production by Charles Taze Russell through the auspices of the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society (representing the Bible Student Movement), was the first major screenplay which incorporated synchronized sound (recorded speech), moving film, and magic lantern color slides."
http://www.filmsite.org/1914-filmhistory.html


Isn't an organ accompliment 'synchronized sound'?

 
djgordy
907856.  Tue May 08, 2012 9:06 am Reply with quote

krollo wrote:

How did Jesse James die?
At home, not in a fight - as this says, he was shot in the back of the head whilst adjusting a picture.


There have been a number of films about Jesse James, notably the 1939 one with Tyrone Power and the 2007 with Brad Pitt and in both Jesse is shown as being shot from behind by Bob Ford.

In the 1921 film "Under the Black Flag" Jesse James was played by his own son, Jesse James Jnr.

www.imdb.com/title/tt0135481/

 
CB27
907875.  Tue May 08, 2012 12:37 pm Reply with quote

I thout it was fairly well known that Jesse James was shot in the back by Bob Ford, with the latter often portrayed as a coward and/or betrayer in music and films for his action.

 
djgordy
907948.  Wed May 09, 2012 3:09 am Reply with quote

The 2007 film's full title was "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford" which kinda sums up the writer's feelings on the matter.

 
nitwit02
908167.  Wed May 09, 2012 8:12 pm Reply with quote

I had a part as an extra in that. The railcar scenes which were shot in Edmonton.
;)

 
tetsabb
908171.  Wed May 09, 2012 8:46 pm Reply with quote

As recorded by the man from Noo Joizy a few years back

Jesse James was a lad that killed many a man,
He robbed the Glendale train,
He stole from the rich and he gave to the poor,
He'd a hand and a heart and a brain.


Well it was Robert Ford, that dirty little coward,
I wonder how he feel,
For he ate of Jesse's bread and he slept in Jesse's bed,
Then he laid poor Jesse in his grave.

(chours)
Well Jesse had a wife to mourn for his life
Three children now they were brave
Well that dirty little coward that shot Mr. Howard
He laid poor Jesse in his grave

Jesse was a man, a friend to the poor,
He'd never rob a mother or a child
There never was a man with the law in his hand
That could take Jesse James alive

It was on a Saturday night and the moon was shining bright,
They robbed the Glendale train,
And people they did say o'er many miles away
It was those outlaws,Ther're Frank and Jesse James

(Chours)
Now the people held their breath when they heard of Jesse's death,
And wondered how he ever came to fall
Robert Ford,It was a fact,He shot Jesse in the back
While Jesse hung a picture on the wall

Now Jesse went to rest with his hand on his breast,
The devil will be upon his knee.
He was born one day in the County Clay,
And he came from a solitary race.


First recorded in 1924. Apparently, the first film about him was made in 1921, with James' own son in the role. A bit creepy if you ask me.

 
suze
908328.  Thu May 10, 2012 11:04 am Reply with quote

I was looking for that 1924 original by Bascom Lamar Lunsford, but it seems not to be on YouTube.

So instead, here's a version by Pete Seeger. Mr Seeger plays it here on banjo, as did Mr Lunsford, so it probably didn't sound vastly diferent from this.

By the by, I've just discovered that Pete Seeger is still alive - I think I probably he thought he'd been dead twenty years. He turned 93 last week.

 

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