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Good old words

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Celebaelin
885195.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:15 am Reply with quote

For myself it's because whenever I use it I get stuck in a loop and repeat the word to myself over and over again alternating between pronouncing it pan-oh-plee and pan-oply.

Thanks to a schoolfriend I can also never use the words picturesque and grotesque without addding, either mentally or verbally, the 'alternative' pronunciations of picture-eskew and grot-eskew.

 
Efros
885196.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:18 am Reply with quote

Well it's still used although 'penthouse' no longer means what it originally did. A shed or sloping roof attached to the side of a building or wall. Wonder if modern penthouse occupiers would still be in occupation of said sort of penthouse.

 
swot
885200.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:34 am Reply with quote

NinOfEden wrote:
We have some lovely dialect words here in Yorks that are fading out of use. Some of my favourites are 'mithering' (whingeing) 'ginnel' (alley) + 'nithering' (cold, miserable weather.)


We use the first two in Lancashire as well (or at least in Chorley). There's also mardy (irritable) which leads to the delightful phrase 'Don't be so mard.'

 
otyikondo
885217.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:08 am Reply with quote

no1 school swot wrote:
NinOfEden wrote:
We have some lovely dialect words here in Yorks that are fading out of use. Some of my favourites are 'mithering' (whingeing) 'ginnel' (alley) + 'nithering' (cold, miserable weather.)


We use the first two in Lancashire as well (or at least in Chorley). There's also mardy (irritable) which leads to the delightful phrase 'Don't be so mard.'


Interesting. Not so very far away, in Nottingham(shire), Lawrence uses the word in a very different context, as "to mollycoddle" and "stifle" (if I understood it correctly), for example in The Daughter-in-Law:

"You'll be a day-man at seven shillings a day till the end of your life - and you'll be satisfied, so long as you can shilly-shally through. That's what your mother did for you - mardin' you up till you were all mard-soft."

The same splendid play also gave the world an excellent term for "sneaking" or "grassing up" someone, or at least "blabbing about something indiscreetly" as in "clat-farted" and "clat-farting"

Possible use today...

"We'd av nivver known nothing about t'Sun, wor it not for that there Guardian going clat-farting..."

 
NinOfEden
885309.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 2:53 pm Reply with quote

We use 'Mardy' too - actually, it was only recently that I learned it was a dilect word.
Though I've not heard 'Mard'. Smeone who is mardy, we call a 'mardy-bum' (or 'mardy-arse' if one feels vulgar.)

 
Bondee
885313.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 3:00 pm Reply with quote

Now then mardy bum...

 
gerontius grumpus
885375.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 5:38 pm Reply with quote

dr bartolo wrote:
I wonder why doesn't anyone use the word " panoply" more often these days.....


I used it when I suggested the Dendra panoply for the D series.

Although that was a rather long time ago.

 
'yorz
885387.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 6:16 pm Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
Now then mardy bum...


That must be an incredibly smutty bum because my computer just won't show it. It makes a disapproving clicking sound and shows a yellow star with an exclamation mark innit.

 
Efros
885406.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 7:30 pm Reply with quote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lp1fQ51YZMM

try that link

 
'yorz
885415.  Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:03 pm Reply with quote

You're a gent ;-)
*curtsies*

 
dr bartolo
885588.  Mon Feb 13, 2012 10:48 am Reply with quote

looking -glasse?

 
strawhat
885599.  Mon Feb 13, 2012 11:42 am Reply with quote

You wouldn't use ginnel where I'm from. It's jennal (pronounced jen-nal) in Sheffield, a word that I can't really find a proper English translation to, because ally is something different in my eyes. My own pet Scouser uses jigger for the same thing.

 
Spike
885604.  Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:27 pm Reply with quote

In York they use 'snickelway' - as far as I know, the only place they do.

 
swot
885610.  Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:06 pm Reply with quote

NinOfEden wrote:
We use 'Mardy' too - actually, it was only recently that I learned it was a dilect word.
Though I've not heard 'Mard'. Smeone who is mardy, we call a 'mardy-bum' (or 'mardy-arse' if one feels vulgar.)


According to a friend from (IIRC) Derby, one can have or be a 'proper mard-face' as well.

 
Efros
885613.  Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:17 pm Reply with quote

Sounds similar to the Geordie/Noreast word clart, as in clarty, clarts and clartin aboot.

 

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