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Good old words

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sally carr
883943.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:05 am Reply with quote

Ugsome is a good one, I wonder how it changed in to ugly.

 
suze
884054.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:38 pm Reply with quote

I used the word epidiascope in class today.

One of the girls even knew what one was.

 
Bondee
884115.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Quit your tomfoolery and lollygagging, you bunch of nincompoops!

 
'yorz
884122.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:46 pm Reply with quote

Is gerrymandering still in use?

I love windbaggery.

 
nitwit02
884145.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:37 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I think we should send some antimassacres to Syria though ...


Pah, you are a poltroon sir! Besides, I feel a shipment of lead budgeriegar perches would be more useful.

 
zomgmouse
884148.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:03 pm Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
I love windbaggery.

So we see. ;)

*goes to hide in a gimcrack ingle-nook*

 
CB27
884155.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 1:02 am Reply with quote

I used kerygma the other day when I was preached to on a bus, they had no idea what it was...

 
plach
884250.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:56 am Reply with quote

Perfidy!

 
Oceans Edge
884268.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 9:29 am Reply with quote

sometimes it's not the word itself is old and fallen out of usage, but that the some usages have fallen out of favour. For instance 'handsome' as applied to the female gender. "She is a handsome woman."

 
AlmondFacialBar
884270.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 9:35 am Reply with quote

Oceans Edge wrote:
sometimes it's not the word itself is old and fallen out of usage, but that the some usages have fallen out of favour. For instance 'handsome' as applied to the female gender. "She is a handsome woman."


I remember reading that in The Canterville Ghost when I was 16 and thinking what a shame it was that it had fallen out of use for the female gender. A handsome woman is definitely different to a pretty woman or a beautiful woman. Katharine Hepburn, for instance, was neither pretty nor beautiful, but she was definitely handsome.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Oceans Edge
884274.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 9:44 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
I remember reading that in The Canterville Ghost when I was 16 and thinking what a shame it was that it had fallen out of use for the female gender. A handsome woman is definitely different to a pretty woman or a beautiful woman. Katharine Hepburn, for instance, was neither pretty nor beautiful, but she was definitely handsome.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Indeed! When I was about 15 a then boyfriend described me as 'a handsome lass', I was quite tickled and delighted by it then. Still use it now. There are a lot of women who fit that description; not traditionally beautiful, or pretty, or cute, or perky, or.... but who are still, non the less, pleasing to the eye. I find myself in good company.

 
djgordy
884299.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:00 am Reply with quote

About a year ago I was watching one of those old b&w films that come on in the afternoon. It was from the 30s or 40s. One scene was at a London railway station and there was a sign that read "all passengers must shew tickets". I thought that "shew" is much nicer than "show" so I have decided to adopt it as my preferred spelling.

I can't remember which film it was but I'm sure that there was a handsome woman in it. I have been known to use that term but if the person knows about it the reaction is not always positive. They think they are being damned with feint praise.

 
Jenny
884307.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:18 am Reply with quote

"Lollygagging" is a word still reasonably current in the US.

 
gerontius grumpus
884379.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:33 pm Reply with quote

How about some good old words like motivated instead of incentivised, obliged instead of obligated, angled instead of angulated and continuing instead of ongoing?

(Ha ha, incentivised and angulated are not recognised by spell checker and I'm not going to add to dictionary.)

 
lemme
884383.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 5:51 pm Reply with quote

Hobbledehoy; a clumsy or awkward youth. (Trollope early 19th century).

Hobbledehoy; a clumsy or awkward youth - especially those with their lowered jeans exposing bum cracks or boxers. (2012)

 

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