View previous topic | View next topic

Good old words

Page 10 of 12
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 9, 10, 11, 12  Next

djgordy
888068.  Wed Feb 22, 2012 10:11 am Reply with quote

Oceans Edge wrote:
sometimes it's not the word itself is old and fallen out of usage, but that the some usages have fallen out of favour. For instance 'handsome' as applied to the female gender. "She is a handsome woman."


Some new episodes of "Phineas and Ferb" are being shewn on one of the cartoon channels this week and last night Major Monogram described Charlene Doofenschmirtz (see below) as "a handsome woman".

 
Oceans Edge
888078.  Wed Feb 22, 2012 10:27 am Reply with quote

I wouldn't disagree :)

 
djgordy
888111.  Wed Feb 22, 2012 11:23 am Reply with quote

She's also very rich. I have been in love with Velma from Scooby Doo but I'd totally dump her for a chance with Charlene Doofenschmirtz.

 
tetsabb
888175.  Wed Feb 22, 2012 2:04 pm Reply with quote

So, djg, would you agree that, while you may be a whore, at least you ain't a cheap whore?
:-)

 
djgordy
888420.  Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:40 am Reply with quote

I think that sums up my position reasonably well.

 
zomgmouse
892319.  Thu Mar 08, 2012 6:05 am Reply with quote

Reading Twain's Connecticut Yankee, and this word came up: blatherskite. I thought it was quite marvellous.

 
Efros
892328.  Thu Mar 08, 2012 6:27 am Reply with quote

Interesting, I'm pretty sure that's Scottish, wonder how it made it's way across the Atlantic.

 
suze
892437.  Thu Mar 08, 2012 12:55 pm Reply with quote

It's in Webster's, so must have some history of usage in North America.

Whether the word originated in Scotland or in the North of England is not clear, but it's certainly not from the Home Counties. The two elements of the word are both from Norse. Blather is from Norse blağra = to talk a lot; I'm sure I need not explain skite.

(If you need a clue, there are quite a lot of words from Norse in which <sk> has become <sh> in English.)

 
'yorz
892454.  Thu Mar 08, 2012 2:04 pm Reply with quote

I've heard blathering used a lot here Oop Norf. Blatherskite, however, not at all. Will ask around.

 
Efros
892480.  Thu Mar 08, 2012 5:32 pm Reply with quote

I've heard blatherskite, and the more common blether in Scotland.

"Robert Burns jocosely laments that his business was to string up blethers in rhyme for fools to sing. Bletherhead is a loquacious fool. Bletherumskite is a synonymous word, but expressive of still greater contempt by the use of the word "skite" or "skyte" which signifies excrement."

From The Dictionary of Slang, Jargon and Cant, sounds like some libel lawyers!

 
NinOfEden
930232.  Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:32 am Reply with quote

I've noticed the word bracket used a few times in Hancock's Half-Hour to refer to some part of the anatomy which one may break or be punched upon.
I think it's probably the nose. If so, that's not a bad word. 'Cos it's a sort of sticky-out triangular thing.

 
Awitt
930441.  Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:00 am Reply with quote

But it doesn't have the same ring to say 'I have a stuffy bracket!'

 
NinOfEden
930480.  Tue Aug 07, 2012 5:45 am Reply with quote

Don't you think? I dunno, I still like it.

 
Starfish13
930558.  Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:19 am Reply with quote

Efros wrote:
"...but expressive of still greater contempt by the use of the word "skite" or "skyte" which signifies excrement."

From The Dictionary of Slang, Jargon and Cant, sounds like some libel lawyers!


Skite is also used as a word for a glancing blow (as in skite roun' the lug) and to mean slip/slide/slither (I went skite on the ice and fell on my arse). It is also used as an insult, to imply that someone is perhaps mentally deficient, insane or just a wee bit crazy (e.g. gone fair skite). A bletherin' skite would be someone talking nonsense.

I'd never heard it refer to poop, but it is quite close to skit/skitter.

Skite is also an alternative name for the village of Drumlithie in Aberdeenshire, which is used in Sunset Song by Lewis Grassic Gibbon and still by the locals.

 
suze
930661.  Tue Aug 07, 2012 1:03 pm Reply with quote

NinOfEden wrote:
I've noticed the word bracket used a few times in Hancock's Half-Hour to refer to some part of the anatomy which one may break or be punched upon.

I think it's probably the nose. If so, that's not a bad word. 'Cos it's a sort of sticky-out triangular thing.


The face rather than specifically the nose, but yes, that's about it. There are references back to the early C19 for bracket mug meaning an ugly face. (As for why one's mug is one's face, it's because drinking mugs often had grotesque faces painted on them. To mug meaning "to assault" has the same origin - originally it meant "to hit in the face".)

Quite why bracket came to mean "ugly" is not known for certain. It may possibly be that an ugly face looked brakkit, an obsolete alternate form of "broken".


A few sources assert that the use of bracket for the face is a euphemism, and that it's rhyming slang (bracket and hinge, which rhymes with another body part altogether). Those sources are trying too hard; there is no evidence whatsoever for this idea.

 

Page 10 of 12
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 9, 10, 11, 12  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group