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Good old words

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NinOfEden
886978.  Sat Feb 18, 2012 4:44 pm Reply with quote

Working on checkouts, I occasionally hear customers reffering to 'tuppenies' or 'thruppence' when counting their change, which I think sounds ace.
I also find that when telling someone a price or amount that consists of any number of pounds with a single digit of pence (eg. 2.06) I find it seems to trip off the tongue much better to say 'Two 'n' six' than 'Two pounds six p' or anything else decimal-sounding.

 
'murcan
887045.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 2:33 am Reply with quote

I like the word "bombast". I haven't used it in quite a while. I'm sure I'll find an opportunity soon, given that this is the inernets 'n all.

Back in my anti-establishment days we used to greet one another with "What cheer?" A colonial greeting we appropriated from the badges of the Providence Police Dept.

No one would associate the PPD with any sort of cheer.

 
Southpaw
887081.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 7:43 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I find it seems to trip off the tongue much better to say 'Two 'n' six' than 'Two pounds six p' or anything else decimal-sounding.


Be wary if they're old 'uns, '2 and 6' would mean two pounds six shillings, no pence involved.

'a'p'orth, now there's a good old word/contraction.

 
soup
887087.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 8:18 am Reply with quote

Southpaw wrote:

'2 and 6' would mean two pounds six shillings, no pence involved.


Nope, 2 an' 6 would be two shillings six pennies . Pre 1971 a pound would be a big deal so would tend to be spoken out in full.
E.G. One pound two shillings and six pennies would be spoken as One pound two an' six and written as 1/2/6d

 
Southpaw
887099.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 9:17 am Reply with quote

I sit corrected (and slightly apathetic and smug as I'm far too young to remember such nonsense).

 
mckeonj
887113.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:18 am Reply with quote

When I were a lad we had farthings, and the price of a small item, labelled as 0/1s/11d would often be spoken as "one eleven three".
Woolworths was the 3d & 6d store; "the thruppeny and sixpenny store".

 
soup
887123.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:19 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
When I were a lad we had farthings,



Bet you had Groats as well.:oP

 
soup
887124.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:20 am Reply with quote

Southpaw wrote:
I'm far too young to remember such nonsense.


I'm not even 50 and I remember it.

 
Efros
887128.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:40 am Reply with quote

I remember farthings, tiny coin with a wren on it, but I don't remember using them as they ceased to be legal tender in 1960, when I was about 1.

 
'murcan
887220.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:30 pm Reply with quote

Leith wrote:
... and in Stirling:


Sma' Vennel
The textures in that photograph are beautifully handled.

 
'murcan
887221.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:36 pm Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
When I were a lad we had farthings, and the price of a small item, labelled as 0/1s/11d would often be spoken as "one eleven three".
Woolworths was the 3d & 6d store; "the thruppeny and sixpenny store".
Woolworth's was a "Five and Dime" or a "Five and ten cent store" reduced to a "5 & 10" in the US.

I like the sound of "half eight" better than "eight thirty". Do you have a fortminute to express 20 past?

 
Efros
887236.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 7:54 pm Reply with quote

The Scots phrase that always baffled me was "the back o' nine" meaning just before nine o'clock, I always thought the logical meaning should have been just after nine o'clock.

 
Leith
887237.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 7:55 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
The textures in that photograph are beautifully handled.

Mostly down to the HDR processing algorithms in Photomatix. I quite like the effect it has on stonework / brickwork :)

'murcan wrote:
Back in my anti-establishment days we used to greet one another with "What cheer?" A colonial greeting we appropriated from the badges of the Providence Police Dept.

I wonder if that's the origin of the greeting 'wotcher' I recall from my South London school days. Google suggests that's one possible etymology.

 
soup
887243.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 8:34 pm Reply with quote

Efros wrote:
The Scots phrase that always baffled me was "the back o' nine" meaning just before nine o'clock, I always thought the logical meaning should have been just after nine o'clock.


I've never heard/used it to mean just before something only just after. So 9.03 would be "the back o' nine"

 
nitwit02
887251.  Sun Feb 19, 2012 9:55 pm Reply with quote

I remember posh shops always priced their product in guineas.
So, following the usual cunning retail practice, something would be priced at 59 guineas.
A guinea was actually one pound and one shilling.

 

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