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Disgusted

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mckeonj
41181.  Wed Dec 21, 2005 3:25 pm Reply with quote

Has "Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells" yet cancelled his subscription to QI?

 
gerontius grumpus
55840.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 4:23 pm Reply with quote

I always find it strange that many people don't think about how words are made.
It occurred to me that if gustation is eating, then disgust must mean to vomit or perhaps come from dysgust, meaning difficulty eating.
Can anyone confirm or refute this suggestion?

 
Celebaelin
55841.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 4:26 pm Reply with quote

The series of events culminating in this

post 44988

must be pretty close.

 
gerontius grumpus
55870.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 5:15 pm Reply with quote

I don't see the connection, that thread seems to be the aftermath of an online argument.

I was hoping someone like Suze might be able to add some information.

Should I have left out the introductory sentence?

 
suze
55879.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:06 pm Reply with quote

You're about right there.

Something which "disgusts" you puts you off your food. As you rightly say, it derives from "dis-" (a general purpose negative / opposite prefix derived from the French des- of the same meaning) and "gust" from the French verb gouster to taste.

As a slight alternative, your other interpretation that something which "disgusts" you makes you want to undo the act of eating - i.e. to vomit - is entirely reasonable.

"Disgust" is of some interest to linguists because there are two ways of pronouncing it. Do you pronounce it as spelt, or do you pronounce it the same way as you say "discussed"? There are people who draw lines on maps to show the distribution of the alternatives; within linguistics they are (slightly unfairly) considered the "anoraks" of the profession.

There are quite a few words that began life as the opposite of something but are now more commonly used than the original word. "Immaculate" for instance, is the opposite of "maculate" which means "spotty". So "immaculate" and "spotless" are almost exact synonyms.

 
Celebaelin
55881.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:10 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
I don't see the connection, that thread seems to be the aftermath of an online argument.

I was hoping someone like Suze might be able to add some information.

Should I have left out the introductory sentence?

I would recommend that you read the exchanges which culminated in that post but MH deleted them all before denying us the pleasure of her company so you can't.

 
gerontius grumpus
55883.  Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:22 pm Reply with quote

Oh I see, thanks.

 
Gaazy
55906.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 3:58 am Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
Oh I see, thanks.

I don't. I've evidently been missing something rather dramatic through not visiting the site as often as I ought.

 
Celebaelin
55919.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 4:58 am Reply with quote

Toys out of prams stuff really "This is an outrage, call me a taxi!" "OK, you're a taxi." I didn't comment at the time myself because MH and I had had an exchange in the Drink thread that became somewhat tense so I thought it best to leave well alone. After her brief absence however she returned to exhibit her wisdom on a broader footing and the 'two dots' post editing phenomenon was the ultimate result of that.

Departing from the gracious if somewhat sarcastic lead set by our admirable moderators I will say that it's a shame, but in a selfish way I was gratified that it wasn't just me who thought her to be an opinionated prima donna. In the end she wouldn't and probably couldn't bring herself to come to any sort of compromise, not even that of a chilly (if not chilled) civility prefering instead a barely concealed hostility with a heavy handed dash of persecution complex.

 
gerontius grumpus
55990.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:26 am Reply with quote

Back on thread, thanks to Suze for the useful information.
Quite interesting, I thought.
The immaculate and maculate bit was good, it explains the specific name 'maculata' which crops up in taxonomy.

can anyone else add any more information along these lines?

 
samivel
56011.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:46 am Reply with quote

Well, I don't know if this is the sort of thing you're after, gg, but the word 'peccable', meaning 'liable to sin', is much less common than 'impeccable'.

 
tetsabb
56020.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:06 am Reply with quote

And yet we have our old faves, inflammable and flammable. What a weird lingo we speak, innit?

 
eggshaped
56022.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:20 am Reply with quote

Safe, tetsabb. Westside.

 
suze
56024.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:31 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
And yet we have our old faves, inflammable and flammable.


Oh are they old faves? Must have been before my time!

Did we come to the conclusion that "flammable" was a made-up word, devised by Health and Saftey types just in case anyone thought that "inflammable" meant something that wouldn't explode?

 
gerontius grumpus
56027.  Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:51 am Reply with quote

I have always understood that they both mean the same.
Inflammable- from inflame. Flammable- from flame.

Inflammable was the slightly better word but it has now been banned because it might appear to be the opposite of flammable.

 

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