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All dictionaries contain one word invented for it

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cinnamonbrandy
861298.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 12:25 am Reply with quote

The meaning of this word is:

'that word placed into a new dictionary so that the copyright rule 'thou shalt not profit from material, all of which is in the public domain', can be dealt with'.

Or thereabouts. Anyone actually found one of these? Been reading dictionaries for years, kinda hoping to - but I suspect they instead invent words that aren't given that definition.

Like 'greige' - a colour between grey and beige. Is that really convincing to you? Or do you think it was invented, and then some interior designer stumbled across it and went - 'YES! Greige IS the new black!' ?

 
cinnamonbrandy
861304.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 12:54 am Reply with quote

okay - i've done my research now - and answered a question I struggled with for years - how can you do that in an A-Z without getting someone badly lost?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trap_street

 
exnihilo
861320.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 3:17 am Reply with quote

They're sometimes called mountweazels after a fictional entry in an encyclopaedia. I'd question "all dictionaries" but it has certainly happened; look up 'esquivaliance' for a verified example.

 
Jenny
861397.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:10 am Reply with quote

Nice piece of info!

 
dr.bob
861398.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:21 am Reply with quote

As mentioned on last night's Museum of Curiosity.

 
exnihilo
861406.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:32 am Reply with quote

Which bit was? I've never listened (?) to it.

 
suze
861438.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 5:08 pm Reply with quote

exnihilo wrote:
I'd question "all dictionaries" but it has certainly happened; look up 'esquivaliance' for a verified example.


I too doubt that all dictionaries do this, but all of the major ones probably do.

I was once told that the Shorter Oxford contains exactly 111 of them (among about one half of a million entries), and that they were all changed betweeen the 2002 and 2007 editions. I've no way of knowing whether or not that is actually true, but I shouldn't be surprised.

 
exnihilo
861455.  Tue Nov 01, 2011 7:21 pm Reply with quote

Along with all the genuine errors, see pastern, dord, and that 'royal hat' I can never remember the name of.

 
dr.bob
861502.  Wed Nov 02, 2011 4:39 am Reply with quote

exnihilo wrote:
Which bit was?


Alex Horne donated the word "Dord", and talked about mountweazels.

exnihilo wrote:
I've never listened (?) to it.


Then you oughta try it. It's really rather good.

 
Jenny
861588.  Wed Nov 02, 2011 12:16 pm Reply with quote

Yes - and you can listen to it from here online without the BBC website blocking you, so I'm fairly sure they'd be OK with Scotland.

 
exnihilo
861592.  Wed Nov 02, 2011 12:45 pm Reply with quote

Well, given I pay a licence fee I should damn well hope they would be.

 
WordLover
864862.  Wed Nov 16, 2011 5:37 am Reply with quote

exnihilo wrote:
Along with all the genuine errors, see pastern, dord, and that 'royal hat' I can never remember the name of.
Abacot? There's a sort of hat called a bicoket, and a series of errors led to the notion that there's a word abacot.

http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=bycoket

But what the OP asked for is false entries put in dictionaries by people who know that they're false.

I don't know any such for a dictionary of words, but there's one in the 6th edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians (pub. 1980, the first edition to incorporate New in its title): a fictitious Danish composer Esrum-Hellerup.

The 38th edition of Who's Who in America (1974-75) contains a fictitious entry, but in this case Who's Who hadn't set a trap for plagiarists, it had merely made a mistake. The editors sent a request for a potted biog to Prof. Aris Rutherford. The professor replied, saying that his name is in fact Rutherford Aris, and he's already in Who's Who in America. Somehow, that message seems not to have got back, and Who's Who repeatedly sent their request. So, after one request, Prof. Aris sent back a fictitious biog for this non-existent Prof. Rutherford, and Who's Who published it.

 
exnihilo
864869.  Wed Nov 16, 2011 6:53 am Reply with quote

Abacot! Thank you.

 

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