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Jeah/ja

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Gooische Vrijgezel
859810.  Thu Oct 27, 2011 9:09 am Reply with quote

Why do unexperienced women, unlike unexperienced men, very, very often use a word like "jeah" to finish a sentence during vox pop tv interviews? Are women doubting, evaluating and approving their own replies immediately? I cannot recall a serious"Nice ... no", while a "That's what I think ... jeah" is extremely common. What's going on there?

Here's a random example, you don't have to wait long to hear the first jeahs.

I can only think of one - jeah - example of an experienced - jeah - male interviewer - jeah - using (a lot of) silent, bored jeahs all the time, typically during an - jeah - expected answer. jeah.

 
Gooische Vrijgezel
860010.  Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:06 am Reply with quote

Quote:
"That's what I think ... jeah" is extremely common. What's going on there?


Code:

                    +--------+
                    | NOBODY |
                    | KNOWS? |
                    +---++---+
                        ||   


Quote:

Here's a random example, you don't have to wait long to hear the first jeahs.


For the record, one may skip the middle. The jeahs near the and at 4:14 and 4:18 are classic examples of its (international) use by women, right? Jeah.

 
Sylvia
860015.  Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:32 am Reply with quote

When you don't like a show or performance, you jeah. When you like a show or performance, you cheah.

 
Jenny
860153.  Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:05 pm Reply with quote

Sylvia wrote:
When you don't like a show or performance, you jeah. When you like a show or performance, you cheah.


That's certainly true in Maine. They talk like that heah - not like they do in Canader.

 
Bondee
860161.  Fri Oct 28, 2011 3:04 pm Reply with quote

Gooische Vrijgezel wrote:
Here's a random example, you don't have to wait long to hear the first jeahs.


I'm hearing a lot of yeahs. I agree with Sylvia, "jeah" would be pronounced "jeer".

 
Sadurian Mike
860167.  Fri Oct 28, 2011 3:46 pm Reply with quote

But the Germans and Dutch use 'j', do they not?

Hence the Junkers 87 is pronounced Yunkers 87, and so on. So presumeably 'jeah' is the Dutch equivalent to our 'yeah'

Maybe.



But yes, I get very annoyed with verbal space-filling with the use of 'yeah', 'yaknow', 'innit', 'like', and so forth.

 
tetsabb
860387.  Sat Oct 29, 2011 11:34 am Reply with quote

I know wotcher mean

 
Gooische Vrijgezel
861521.  Wed Nov 02, 2011 6:54 am Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
But the Germans and Dutch use 'j', do they not?


Yeah. Dutch is a german language, and indeed I'm using it's "ja" to ask this real J series question... ...Yeah. Dutch and German people would use "ja" ("yes")... Yeah... If they'ld use yeah instead of "ja" (or "doch"), they'ld use "yeah" too... Yeah...

The offtopic German "doch", almost pronounced like "dog", is a "denying yes" like "isn't it". Assuming you slept last week:

- You didn't sleep at all last week?
-- Doch.

Sadurian Mike wrote:
But yes, I get very annoyed with verbal space-filling with the use of 'yeah', 'yaknow', 'innit', 'like', and so forth.


Yeah. The random example provided earlier shows the woman saying "yeah" while walking away, about 4 seconds after another "yeah". As if she's approving the whole interview... ...Yeah.

An "go on"'ish "yeah" by a male interviewer isn't unusual, but women use such a "yeah" (or "ja) so often it's almost scary... ...Yeah. It's international:

- Did you design your own dress?
-- Yes, I designed my own dress... ...Yeah.

- Heb je je eigen jurk ontworpen?
-- Ja, ik heb mijn eigen jurk ontworpen... ...Ja.

I really wonder what's going on there! ...Yeah. The "like" fits in a sentence, but the "yeah" is added after a complete, finished sentence... ...Jeah. There was no need for the woman's "yeah" in the video at 4:18, for example... Yeah. She already said it at 4:14, and she's walking away from the scene... ...Yeah.

 
mckeonj
861524.  Wed Nov 02, 2011 7:23 am Reply with quote

An interesting sidelight on 'ja/yeah' usage is that in 'classical' English the word 'Yes' is used with meaning 'I agree'; whereas 'Aye' is used in affirmation, sometimes doubled for extra strength.
from a document about 'Quakers':
Quote:
Friends do not take oaths. From the beginning, Friends have said, “Let your aye be aye and your nay be nay.” They believe that honesty is a daily habit and that the taking of an oath implies that one is not ordinarily truthful. Early Friends were jailed, fined and persecuted for this peculiar practice. Now all legal documents and courts of law allow Friends and other like-minded people to say I affirm instead of I swear.

If I were charged with an offence by a police officer, I would reply 'Yes' to the charge, meaning that I understand the charge, not that it is true.
Also note that Irish has no word for 'Yes'; instead one says 'Sa' (it is so).

I suggest that '.....ja/yeah' (after a pause) is in fact an affirmation by the speaker of the truth of the statement.

 
RLDavies
863009.  Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:56 am Reply with quote

I've heard from various sources that the interpolation of "you know" and "yeah" in casual speech became prevalent in the 1960s with the rise of the civil rights movement in America.

According to this theory, at the time slavery was abolished, most of the slaves spoke English with a thick accent based on a mix of African languages and the American deep south accent. When they were emancipated and left the plantations to make their own livings, they found that many people had a hard time understanding them. Like anyone struggling to be understood, they checked for confirmation after making each important point.

The 1950s and 1960s were still only a few generations post-slavery and still highly segregated. By this time, interpolated questions like "you know what I mean?", "right?", "yeah?" were part of ordinary speech among young black Americans, who had copied the habit from their parents and grandparents.

As young whites joined the civil rights movement, they purposely adopted the same habit to show solidarity with the blacks. Soon it was seen not as a black way of talking, but as a young people's way of talking. Which is essentially where we stand today.

 
RLDavies
863018.  Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:19 am Reply with quote

We can't really discuss "yeah" without mentioning rock and pop music. It's become a fully international word in this context, but as a general expression of energy and enthusiasm instead of having any particular "yes" meaning.

I was reminded of this while listening to a song in Esperanto that contains "yeah"s and actually finishes with "yeah, yeah, yeah". Which is not only meaningless in Esperanto, but the vowel sound itself doesn't occur in Esperanto!

 
mckeonj
863019.  Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:21 am Reply with quote

Does RLD's point explain the 'interrogative lift' at the end of a statement, apparent in young speech?
It annoys me, and I dare say a few other BOFs.

 

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