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4886.  Tue Jan 20, 2004 8:14 am Reply with quote

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4888.  Tue Jan 20, 2004 9:05 am Reply with quote

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5095.  Thu Jan 22, 2004 12:00 pm Reply with quote

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5112.  Thu Jan 22, 2004 2:27 pm Reply with quote

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laidbacklazyman
21198.  Sat Jun 04, 2005 4:52 am Reply with quote

I've been trawling through the site looking for interesting snippets to add to my site and the Rosa Parks / Claudette Colvin story is one thing that really caught my eye.

It seems that Colvin was overlooked in the civil rights movement because, whilst Parks simply remained in her seat and in doing so breaking the law, Colvin commited an assault. It was this she was found guilty of not the segregation laws. Covin wasn't sentenced on the segregation charge to prevent her legal team of Nixon and Durr from taking the case to the Supreme Court. Incidentally the black community in Birmingham did try to negotiate with the bus company to prevent the case proceeding to court, one of the negotiators happen to be a young and as yet unknown preacher by the name of Martin Luther King

sources various - and put into my own words

 
simonp
21509.  Sun Jun 12, 2005 2:39 am Reply with quote

[quote="garrick92"]http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,278470,00.html


Quote:
"If the first bus is delayed by traffic fluctuations then there are more passengers waiting for it," said Prof Wren. "They take longer to board the bus than expected, and it leaves fewer people waiting for the second bus, and even fewer for the third, so the buses catch up with each other.

The real question is why this effect stops with the third bus. If this model is true, why don't all the buses in a fleet end up driving round in a nose-to-tail convoy? Ah, sweet mysteries of life, etc.


The bus company i drive for stops its high frequency busses bunching up through 2 methods.
1 if the next bus is right behind you when you are approaching a bus stop and someone hails you then you do not stop. (if no one on your bus wants to get off) this does not delay the intending passenger as they get on the bus immediatly behind you. This method allows drivers to keep some distance between each other. its not foolproof but it helps.

2 If a bus is running more than a pre-determined time late the driver can arrange via radio with the inspector to run "out of service". i.e not picking up passengers. this allows the bus to get back on schedule and prevents bunching which is a waste of resources.

Hope that answers your question garrick92

 
Flash
21515.  Sun Jun 12, 2005 3:26 pm Reply with quote

That's what this site needs more of - first-hand expert testimony. Thanks and welcome, simonp.

 
laidbacklazyman
21517.  Sun Jun 12, 2005 4:13 pm Reply with quote

simonp wrote:

1 if the next bus is right behind you when you are approaching a bus stop and someone hails you then you do not stop. (if no one on your bus wants to get off) this does not delay the intending passenger as they get on the bus immediatly behind you. This method allows drivers to keep some distance between each other. its not foolproof but it helps.

2 If a bus is running more than a pre-determined time late the driver can arrange via radio with the inspector to run "out of service". i.e not picking up passengers. this allows the bus to get back on schedule and prevents bunching which is a waste of resources.



The one problem with these solutions, they both cause aggrevation for the driver of the bus driver that does pick up the passengers. I recall during my early days at London Transport being asked by one passenger where I had been, even though she had watched me move slowly down the road in a traffic jam. This prompted me to respond to the next person that told me I was late that in fact I was early as I had been at work for 3 hours, it was the customer that was going to be late. It was that evening that, having been called into the managers office, perhaps I wasn't best suited to working with members of the British public. Americans however love that kind of thing so I have fun with overseas passengers now. No more late nights or early mornings and everyone that's on my bus is there because they want to. ;-)

Maybe next time you get on a bus that the driver too is having a bad day and instead of reminding him that he is late greet him (or her) with a smile and a good morning (you'd be suprised how much this freaks out English people

 
simonp
21524.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 2:24 am Reply with quote

The one problem with these solutions, they both cause aggrevation for the driver of the bus driver that does pick up the passengers.

True. Some days you're the pigeon, others you're the statue

 
Lord_Wilson
21561.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 9:07 am Reply with quote

simonp wrote:
The one problem with these solutions, they both cause aggrevation for the driver of the bus driver that does pick up the passengers.

True. Some days you're the pigeon, others you're the statue


Which is why I'm always nice to bus drivers when I'm on the bus, always with the please, the thank you and the "cheers" when you get off.

 
simonp
21581.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:13 pm Reply with quote

if only all passengers were that nice. Sometimes, when people ask how long the next bus will be; i have replied "about 40 feet, same as this one". You do have to judge your audience with that one though. :-)


Last edited by simonp on Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:22 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
21583.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:19 pm Reply with quote

Something I've noticed over here in the US is that passengers here invariably say 'thank you' to the driver when they get off the bus, even in famously rude New York City. Is that because Americans are naturally more polite, or because they're so pathetically grateful for the shreds of public transport available, do you think?

 
laidbacklazyman
21584.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:21 pm Reply with quote

I often get asked - "How does this work" when someone wants to get a ticket for the tours. I then go in to the workings of the internal combustion engine. The advantage I have is my "audience" is always ready for a bit of a joke

 
Lord_Wilson
21593.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 1:26 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Something I've noticed over here in the US is that passengers here invariably say 'thank you' to the driver when they get off the bus, even in famously rude New York City. Is that because Americans are naturally more polite, or because they're so pathetically grateful for the shreds of public transport available, do you think?


I don't think it's that Ameicans are any more polite, just less inhibited.

In America (when I was there at least) strangers will often talk to one another in the queue at a supermarket, try to do that in England (which I did a couple of times) and they look at you as if they think you're about to mug them or something.....

Also, slightlyon topic, I just found this article which is, as they say, Quite Interesting.

Well, I thought so anyway.....
http://news.webindia123.com/news/showdetails.asp?id=87406&cat=Science

 
Beehive
21596.  Mon Jun 13, 2005 3:18 pm Reply with quote

At least two-thirds of people (a very scientific study, this) say thankyou to the driver in Oxford, too.

 

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