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Time zone J

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redtomcat
847173.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:41 am Reply with quote

There isnt one!

Times zones allocated a letter corresponding to the difference from Greenwich..... as per table below.

Z = Zulu = Greenwich (London) not the (Greenwich) village

Zone ZD SUFFIX
7W. to 7E. 0 Z
7E. to 22E. -1 A
22E. to 37E. -2 B
37E. to 52E. -3 C
52E. to 67E. -4 D
67E. to 82E. -5 E
82E. to 97E. -6 F
97E. to 112E. -7 G
112E. to 127E. -8 H
127E. to 142E. -9 I
142E. to 157E. -10 K
157E. to 172E. -11 L
172E. to 180 -12 M
7W. to 22W. 1 N
22W. to 37W. 2 O
37W. to 52W. 3 P
52W. to 67W. 4 Q
67W. to 82W. 5 R
82W. to 97W. 6 S
97W. to 112W. 7 T
112W. to 127W. 8 U
127W. to 142W. 9 V
142W. to 157W. 10 W
157W. to 172W. 11 X
172W. to 180 12 Y

Probably due to the ease of confusing I and J, but then again why to car registrations in UK have J but not I ? errmmmm.

 
zomgmouse
847182.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:56 am Reply with quote

Similarly, but competely off-topic, our class forms were lettered but skipped I (so, 9A, 9B ... 9H, 9J, 9K). Possibly also due to it being able to be misread as the number 1.

 
CB27
847208.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 11:57 am Reply with quote

The letters were designed by Nataniel Bowditch, in his book "The American Practical Navigator". Bowditch wanted to show that American were as good at navigating as the leaders of the time, Britain.

As the letter mark halfway between zones, there are 25, so one letter had to be dropped. Bowditch decided that as the letter J was missing from many contemporary languages, and he wanted American seamanship to be recognised wordlwide, he decided to leave out the J.

 
redtomcat
847233.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 12:29 pm Reply with quote

Open the lines for jokes about American seamen .....

 
WordLover
848864.  Wed Sep 21, 2011 5:28 am Reply with quote

He was Nathaniel Bowditch (1773-1838). In his day, the convention of regarding J/j as a separate letter from I/i (rather than merely an alternative shape of the same letter) was only a few decades old. Johnson treated I and J as identical in his Dictionary (pub. 1755). So the idea of leaving J out was not as outlandish as it might appear.

I think the lettering scheme would have been more elegant if the time zone to the west of Z were Y, and so on. Then crossing time zones from west to east would mean going forwards in the alphabet in both hemispheres.

 
FrostySaint42
922922.  Mon Jul 09, 2012 3:23 pm Reply with quote

Actually, there IS a time zone J (or Juliet). It's used by military, and is used to denote "local time" as compared to Z (or zulu), which is GMT.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_time_zones

(I know it's Wiki, but I've seen references to it elsewhere).

 
plinkplonk
923038.  Tue Jul 10, 2012 4:28 am Reply with quote

FrostySaint42 wrote:
Actually, there IS a time zone J (or Juliet).


Or Jig, Jug, Johnny, Jack, Jerusalem, John, Joseph, Julius or Jos, depending on which phonetic alphabet takes your fancy...

 
Oceans Edge
923134.  Tue Jul 10, 2012 9:51 am Reply with quote

the military in general does favour the NATO (aka ICAO) phonetic alphabet

 
Oceans Edge
923135.  Tue Jul 10, 2012 9:55 am Reply with quote

FrostySaint42 wrote:
Actually, there IS a time zone J (or Juliet). It's used by military, and is used to denote "local time" as compared to Z (or zulu), which is GMT.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_time_zones

(I know it's Wiki, but I've seen references to it elsewhere).


It's NOT actually GMT, but UTC (Coordinated Universal Time)

I know I know ... nitpicking...

 
Confucius
937732.  Sat Sep 08, 2012 3:58 am Reply with quote

Oceans Edge wrote:
FrostySaint42 wrote:
Actually, there IS a time zone J (or Juliet). It's used by military, and is used to denote "local time" as compared to Z (or zulu), which is GMT.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_time_zones

(I know it's Wiki, but I've seen references to it elsewhere).


It's NOT actually GMT, but UTC (Coordinated Universal Time)

I know I know ... nitpicking...


Whilst you are correct, most people in the military still refer to it as GMT, because, well, because UTC is foreign, GMT is ours.

 
Oceans Edge
937778.  Sat Sep 08, 2012 10:24 am Reply with quote

that really only counts for the British Military, my time in the Canadian military, and airline industry - we always used UTC - can't say for other countries' militaries - but yeah it's only yours if you're British :)

 
Confucius
937794.  Sat Sep 08, 2012 2:05 pm Reply with quote

We also use it because the various 'staneval' units get their knickers in a right old twist whenever we call it GMT, which is probably the best reason in all honesty.

 

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