View previous topic | View next topic

Idioms

Page 2 of 4
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

bobwilson
846983.  Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:39 pm Reply with quote

I would just like to point out that although I am an uncle I'm not known to my relatives as "bob" - so don't blame me.

 
'yorz
847025.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 3:49 am Reply with quote

Sydney Herald says:
Quote:
"Bob's your uncle" is not actually an authentically Australian phrase, such as fair dinkum, mad as a cut snake, gone walkabout, chuck a Uey (one I do say when driving...any guesses to the meaning?), not the full quid. "Bob's your uncle" most probably originated in Britain, and according to Wiki, probably 'derives from the slang phrase "All is bob", meaning that everything is safe, pleasant or satisfactory. This dates back to the eighteenth century or so...'

 
zomgmouse
847175.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:47 am Reply with quote

I wrote about some here.
Since then:
"Many moons ago" - it's the same moon. This would probably be linked to the concept of a "new moon".

What's the Greek equivalent of "it's all Greek to me"?
I looked this up, because I like doing that, and found this Wikipedia page with equivalents in many languages. Apparently people like picking on Chinese a lot.

 
'yorz
847236.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:07 pm Reply with quote

Dutchies think it's all Chinese.

 
Posital
847282.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 4:42 pm Reply with quote

That's just double dutch...

 
'yorz
847285.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 4:45 pm Reply with quote

Yawn.

 
Posital
847289.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 4:50 pm Reply with quote

Time for bed, methinks.

 
AlmondFacialBar
847298.  Fri Sep 16, 2011 5:22 pm Reply with quote

For whichever reason, if you want to bring the same concept across in German you say that all you understand is railway station. *helpless gesture*

Wiki's assertion about Das kommt mir spanisch vor is actually wrong. That turn of phrase means something looks dodgy to you, not that you can't understand it. I like the Esperanto one.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
zomgmouse
849670.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 5:50 am Reply with quote

Quote:
For whichever reason, if you want to bring the same concept across in German you say that all you understand is railway station. *helpless gesture*

That's just hilarious.

 
Alasseo
849688.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 6:28 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:

Posital wrote:
cheap as chips


I'll go with David Dickinson on Bargain Hunt, circa 2000. Was the expression in general use before that? (Since taking over from Mr Dickinson, Tim Wonnacott refuses to use it and refers instead to "inexpensive fried potatoes".)


Since I recall it being the answer to a Catchphrase puzzle from the early-mid 90s, and hearing it used in primary school assemblies at around the same time, yes, it was used before then.

 
Efros
849726.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 8:20 am Reply with quote

I think it must have been around for a while, chips aint that cheap anymore.

 
'yorz
849823.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:04 pm Reply with quote

About the French shouting , "BIS"!, and not 'encore'. Stephen said that 'encore' means 'more'. As far as I know, 'encore' means 'again'.
"Encore une fois". Once again.

 
mckeonj
849834.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:33 pm Reply with quote

In Irish we shout arís (again), or, if of a scholarly bent arís eile (again once), or, arís is arís (again and again).
I myself have been heard to call bis, arís after a jolly good set.

 
CB27
849835.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:55 pm Reply with quote

"Cheap as chips"

About a third of the way down the page, above the headline that says "R. Hannah & Co."

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=EP18860724.2.2.5

Precedes Dickinson by over a century.

 
suze
849840.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 5:07 pm Reply with quote

Ooh! Thanks for that, CB. So the expression was current - in New Zealand at least - as long ago as 1886. Not a lot of people know that ...

 

Page 2 of 4
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group