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Wot Do D's Have In Common?

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Flash
37607.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 6:01 am Reply with quote

I'd forgotten that story. Is it 'safe', do we think? ie, is there a good source?

 
djgordy
37610.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 6:29 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
I'd forgotten that story. Is it 'safe', do we think? ie, is there a good source?


Here is a reference from the Daily Telegraph itself:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/05/03/nxword03.xml&sSheet=/news/2004/05/03/ixnewstop.html

 
Flash
37614.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 7:10 am Reply with quote

Excellent, thanks. The clue for the word 'Utah' is 'one of the US'. I don't understand it, I must say, unless it just means 'one of the united states', which seems a bit feeble as the answer could just as well be 'Ohio', say.

 
djgordy
37618.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 7:24 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Excellent, thanks. The clue for the word 'Utah' is 'one of the US'. I don't understand it, I must say, unless it just means 'one of the united states', which seems a bit feeble as the answer could just as well be 'Ohio', say.


Don't forget there was a war on. Crossword clues were rationed just like chocolate and nylons. Oh I added some more info to my original post regarding the real origin of the suspicious answers.

 
QI Individual
37634.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 8:34 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
We try not to ask 'cryptic' questions as such - the function of the question is to introduce the topic, and if it doesn't either do that or give any scope for an entertaining (though wrong) answer, it generally turns out to be a dead end.

EG the function of a question about D-day would be to say, basically: "Let's talk about D-day", not to conceal the fact that that's what we want to talk about.

There have been exceptions, but we have normally repented of them.

But then, as I understand it, D-Day itself cannot be an answer anymore but whatever answer there will be must also be (closeley related to) a D-word.

You can understand the appeal of D-Day as an answer in the D-series. To avoid it being too obvious you'd have to phrase the question in a way that would prevent that. A lot of other questions could be asked where the answer would be (related to) D-Day of course.

 
Flash
37637.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 9:09 am Reply with quote

Well ... I didn't explain that very well. The answer can be D-Day but the question needs to contain something they can work with even if they don't know that. Basically we try to avoid questions which are only interesting once you know the answer.

 
QI Individual
37641.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 9:47 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Well ... I didn't explain that very well. The answer can be D-Day but the question needs to contain something they can work with even if they don't know that. Basically we try to avoid questions which are only interesting once you know the answer.

Of course I am/was aware that the question does not give maximum scope for funny reactions. I was just attracted to it as a particularly nice D-answer and the vast room for QI follow up.

With a different question attached it might still be a useable subject.

 
djgordy
37646.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 11:02 am Reply with quote

Round Britian Quiz on Radio 4 (if it's still going) has almost impenetrably cryptic questions.

In this case it is interesting that the boy who supplied the suspicious answers was called French, since the whole thing was about the invasion of France.

 
Flash
37687.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:35 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
With a different question attached it might still be a useable subject.
Yes indeed.

 
JumpingJack
37707.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 4:32 pm Reply with quote

Flash,

"One of the US".

The double meaning is "one of the United States" and "one of the class of things beginning with U".

Not difficult, admittedly, but not that bad either,

 

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