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Wot Do D's Have In Common?

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QI Individual
37511.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 2:28 pm Reply with quote

What is the relationship between Omaha, Utah and Gold?

 
samivel
37521.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 2:54 pm Reply with quote

D-Day landing beaches in Normandy, along with Java and Sword

 
QI Individual
37534.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 4:05 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
D-Day landing beaches in Normandy, along with Java and Sword


Xelent.

Did de D's help too much here?

And did you Google or did you just know it?

 
Celebaelin
37535.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 4:49 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
D-Day landing beaches in Normandy, along with Java and Sword


Er, Juno and Sword don't you mean?

 
samivel
37577.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:28 pm Reply with quote

Oh, yeah. Sorry

 
Celebaelin
37580.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:32 pm Reply with quote

I don't take offence but the Canadians might be a bit hurt, if you know what I mean.

 
samivel
37582.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:36 pm Reply with quote

Quite - I don't know what made me write Java :)

 
Jenny
37583.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:37 pm Reply with quote

Well I knew it, phrased like that. I wonder if there's a different way to phrase it though.

One QI bit of information I think is why it was called D-Day. Nowadays, that terminology is firmly associated with the landings on the Normandy beaches in 1944, but actually the 'D' in D-Day does not stand for anything, it's a just a name the military use when planning an event.

The details of the invasion were planned long before the military knew exactly what date would be chosen, but they still had to organise the order in which things were done. The date was thus named 'D-Day' (there was also H-Hour I believe) and all else was organised as happening on 'D-Day minus one' or 'D-Day minus two' and so on.

 
Jenny
37584.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 10:39 pm Reply with quote

I've just looked in Wikipedia, which says:

Quote:
The earliest use of these terms by the U.S. Army that the Center of Military History has been able to find was during World War I. In Field Order Number 9, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces, dated 7 September 1918: "The First Army will attack at H hour on D day with the object of forcing the evacuation of the St. Mihiel Salient."


So that might make a good question - when and where was the first D-Day?

 
Celebaelin
37585.  Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:28 pm Reply with quote

And by extension a whole bunch of Normandy landings questions, not many of which seem to have any D relevance as far as I can recall.

There’s the DD Sherman (the sink tank)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherman_DD

Dwight David Eisenhower

http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/brochures/ike/ike.htm
(etc)

Destroyers (specifically those ships which sailed in close to Omaha beach to fire point blank at the defences)

The Satterlee and the Emmons were at Omaha but the names are not proving easy to come by.

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_701702421/D-Day.html

http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/wwii/dday/omaha.aspx

AHA

http://www.usni.org/navalhistory/articles04/NHAllenJun-2.htm

There they are!

Quote:
Destroyers were ordered to risk grounding by steaming close to shore and firing their 5-inch guns as supporting fire for the men on the beach. The Emmons (DD-457) and other fire-support destroyers sailed as close as 1,000 yards from the beaches. (Historian Samuel Eliot Morison puts the destroyers within 800 yards of Omaha Beach.). Another close-in destroyer, the Jeffers (DD-621), was shelling a German position when the shrapnel of a near-miss wounded five of her crew.


I thought the Laffey (DD-724) went in close as well but the site doesn’t specifically mention that.

That’s me about done for D-Day Ds.

 
laidbacklazyman
37590.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 2:49 am Reply with quote

Ike was the first president to be limited to only serving 2 terms, All others previous to him were allowed to stand as many times as they liked until Franklin D. Roosevelt. The only reason why they stood for just 2 terms was because of the precedent set by Washington.

Following FDR was Truman and during his presidency the 22nd amendment was passed restricting the terms to the current 2.

Incidentally should George Dubya and President Cheney become incapacitated in any way, impeachment for example the guy at the top of the tree is J. Dennis Hastert. Possibley the third most powerful man in the world and has anyone heard of him?

 
BobTheScientist
37591.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 3:51 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Well I knew it, phrased like that. I wonder if there's a different way to phrase it though.


Associatively? What do Nebraska, Silver, Peacock and Buckler have in common and what's the fifth?

 
QI Individual
37592.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 4:13 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Well I knew it, phrased like that. I wonder if there's a different way to phrase it though.


I was aware that with all da D's it might be a bit too much of a clue.
Later I realised that with a little obfuscation it would be possible to hide the answer better by phrasing it a bit more like this.

Why is the 79th element Gold of special importance to the 45th US state Utah and Omaha, the largest city of the state Nebraska?

Since Omaha beach is probably the best known name in this context, in order to avoid it's name triggering the mind it is now hidden in the middle of the sentence between a lot of other words/information. Both at the front or at the end of the sentence the name lingers in the mind longer which makes it easier to make the right connection.

D-Day refers to such a vast area of information that it would give ample opportunity for follow up.

 
Flash
37602.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 5:42 am Reply with quote

We try not to ask 'cryptic' questions as such - the function of the question is to introduce the topic, and if it doesn't either do that or give any scope for an entertaining (though wrong) answer, it generally turns out to be a dead end.

EG the function of a question about D-day would be to say, basically: "Let's talk about D-day", not to conceal the fact that that's what we want to talk about.

There have been exceptions, but we have normally repented of them.

BTW, I like the question about Dennis Hastert, who is 2nd in line to succeed the President by virtue of his role as Speaker of the House. In a Fox News Sunday interview with Chris Wallace in August 2004 he had this to say about George Soros, a contributor to the Democratic Party's campaign funds:
Quote:
HASTERT: Here in this campaign, quote, unquote, "reform," you take party power away from the party, you take the philosophical ideas away from the party, and give them to these independent groups.

You know, I don't know where George Soros gets his money. I don't know where—if it comes overseas or from drug groups or where it comes from. And I—

WALLACE (interrupting): Excuse me?

HASTERT: Well, that's what he's been for a number years—George Soros has been for legalizing drugs in this country. So, I mean, he's got a lot of ancillary interests out there.

WALLACE: You think he may be getting money from the drug cartel?

HASTERT: I'm saying I don't know where groups—could be people who support this type of thing. I'm saying we don't know. The fact is we don't know where this money comes from.

 
djgordy
37605.  Thu Dec 08, 2005 5:54 am Reply with quote

We cannot allow this thread to go forward without mentioning the great crossword clue panic of 1944.

Leonard Dawe was a crossword compiler for the Daily Telegraph. In the weeks prior to D-day answers to clues he provided included:

Utah (one of the beaches)
Omaha (another beach)
Juno (yet another beach)
Gold (guess what? another beach!)
Sword (that makes 5 beaches out of 5)
Overlord (the codename for the invasion)
Mulberry (the name of the floating harbours that were to be towed over to Normandy)
Neptune (the code name for the naval support for the operation).

As a result of his base treason Mr. Dawe was sentenced to life in the Tower of London on a diet of bread and water.



Oh, hold on, that last bit is wrong. It was actually decided that the whole thing was a coincidence.

However, later on it emerged that it was something more than mere chance. What actually appears to have happened is that Mr. Dawes was a school master and he got his pupils to fill in the blank crossword grids, to which he would then make up the clues. One of the pupils, Ronald French, use to hang around the local army camp and picked up the words from the American and Canadian soldiers. He then inserted the words into the blank grids. The code words were quite well known but the actual locations they referred to were a secret.


Last edited by djgordy on Thu Dec 08, 2005 6:43 am; edited 3 times in total

 

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