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Pinky
880338.  Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:33 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
No, no, no.

Peanut butter & Marmite.

Revolting*? Tell Sainsbury's, they sell it ready-mixed.

* no.


Oh I'm a big PB & Marmite fan. I also occasionally add in a scraping of mustard as well for when I want to be particularly attention-seeking with my toast spreads :)

 
Bondee
880344.  Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:51 pm Reply with quote

My second favourite sandwich...

Take three slices of bread...

1. butter and Marmite.
2. peanut butter.
3. cheese on toast, Lea & Perrins optional.

Place the toasted slice between the two others.

 
AlmondFacialBar
880349.  Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:57 pm Reply with quote

onion wrote:
CB27 wrote:
Only if you're talking to an American. If you're talking to an English person it's jam.


I believe not, there is a distinction (correct me if i'm wrong), jam has 'bits' in it (as in seeds,skin, etc) and jelly is smooth, and is often more solid.
Hence us having both bramble jelly and blackberry jam both made of the same fruit.


Interesting, that's actually quite close to the German definition of the two. For us, jelly is smooth and wobbly and made of juice, and jam is chunky and spreadable and made of the entire fruit. Hence my mom makes both red currant jelly and red currant jam.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Efros
880384.  Tue Jan 24, 2012 7:26 pm Reply with quote

For brekkie Rose's Lime Marmalade on hot buttered toast, or Duer's thick cut Seville marmalade. I have tried Marmite with peanut butter it's good but to be honest I prefer Marmite on hot buttered toast just as it is. PBJ I don't care for, I too am not fond of the combination of salt and sweet, seems to be huge in the USA, chocolate covered pretzels FFS, even pretzel M&Ms.

 
user1001
1072675.  Mon May 05, 2014 10:55 pm Reply with quote

It was said in a certain episode of QI, that in America jam is called jelly. To correct this, in America, jam has seeds and jelly doesn't. Both terms are used but are not interchangeable.

 
user1001
1072676.  Mon May 05, 2014 11:03 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
bobwilson wrote:
Jenny wrote:
I've never heard of that either. Now it seems to be sold with additional marshmallow fluff. This probably explains a lot about the difference between the current generation of Americans and their forbears.


Isn't everything from the USA sold with additional marshmallow fluff?


Especially the politics.


Yes, Guy Fawkes gave Americans s'more to consider.

 
Humming Bird
1108658.  Fri Jan 02, 2015 11:51 am Reply with quote

user1001 wrote:
It was said in a certain episode of QI, that in America jam is called jelly. To correct this, in America, jam has seeds and jelly doesn't. Both terms are used but are not interchangeable.


I wonder if this is because of the jellied nature of the Jam. In as much as you can get whole fruit cranbury sauce, or jellied cranberry sauce. I know its a bit of an off track example but, is it not possible to get in the first instance a whole fruit jam or alternatively a jellied fruit jam? Could this be the mysterious jelly of peanut butter fame?

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1108666.  Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:40 pm Reply with quote

user1001 wrote:
It was said in a certain episode of QI, that in America jam is called jelly. To correct this, in America, jam has seeds and jelly doesn't. Both terms are used but are not interchangeable.


US jam is identical to UK jam; it has the fruit and seeds just like ours. The real difference is that Jelly sells better in the US where the idea of the whole fruit in the spread is a bit weird. This also means that what we call Jelly has developed a new name in the US; 'Jello'.

 
Efros
1108669.  Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:49 pm Reply with quote

Jelly is a generic term Jell-O is in fact a trademarked brandname. In Scotland "jeely" is the colloquial term for strained jam.

 
CharliesDragon
1108688.  Fri Jan 02, 2015 6:27 pm Reply with quote

... Jam should have pieces of fruit/berry in it. That's what makes the taste, damn it!

I have had jam in the UK a time or two and it is much more jelly-like. It has been from hotels and not-very-high-end cafés, though, so it might have been cheaper stuff, I don't know.

 
nitwit02
1108713.  Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:02 pm Reply with quote

It must be jelly, 'cos jam don't shake like that.

 
Efros
1108717.  Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:19 pm Reply with quote

Favourite unusual jam was Hartley's Pineapple jam, my Dad used to kmake damson jam which was killer, he also made very good bramble jelly.

 
Jenny
1108830.  Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:13 pm Reply with quote

Pineapple jam is hard to make because it has an enzyme in it that prevents jelling. I think you have to mix it with something or put extra pectin in it, or some such thing.

 
Efros
1108833.  Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:19 pm Reply with quote

I think it's more that pineapple contains no pectin at all, the enzyme you're thinking of is bromelain which breaks down proteins, my mum once gave herself a very sore mouth by eating too much unripe pineapple in one go. Pectin is a polysaccharide which causes gelling by cross linking between strands, somewhat like starch.

 
Jenny
1108835.  Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:23 pm Reply with quote

I think I made quince and pineapple jam once - quince is very high in pectin.

 

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