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Disraeli

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Celebaelin
45895.  Sun Jan 15, 2006 10:04 pm Reply with quote

Well, this is a biggie. Too big for me to pretend to know much about I think but it isn’t up here yet so I think I’ll start it off with a couple of quotes and a short précis of the first part of the Wiki entry.

I am myself a gentleman of the press and I bear no other scutcheon.

When I want to read a novel, I write one. (Attrib.)

A sophistical rhetoretician inebriated with the exuberance of his own verbosity. (About Gladstone)

Thank you for your manuscript, I shall loose no time in reading it. (Usual reply to unsolicited work)

I will sit down now, but the time will come when you will hear me. (Maiden speech)


The Right Honourable Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) - British statesman and literary figure.

Of Italian Jewish descent (D’Israeli) Disraeli was baptised into the Church of England and after giving up on the law became essentially a PR copywriter for various private financial ventures after a year or so he started to write novels. His first, Vivian Grey (1827) was not well received but he continued to write and over the next ten years published a variety of works but with little success.

In 1837 he was elected as a Tory MP (having written some polital copy for the Tories in 1832 and despite having initially stood for election as a Radical and his retention of Radical sympathies).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Disraeli

 
Gray
45942.  Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:34 am Reply with quote

My favourite quote of his was reputedly from a debate he was having with Gladstone:
Quote:
Gladstone said: "I predict, Sir, that you will die either by hanging or of some vile disease". Disraeli replied: "That all depends, sir, upon whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

You don't get that kind of repartee today...

 
Celebaelin
45957.  Mon Jan 16, 2006 10:11 am Reply with quote

There are lots of people credited with that one including:

John Wilkes (1725-97) to Lord Sandwich - the hot favourite
and Samuel Foote (1720-77)

 
ryewacket
46297.  Tue Jan 17, 2006 11:47 am Reply with quote

You may also recognise the reader in the Tenniel illo from Alice Through The Looking Glass

 
samivel
46357.  Tue Jan 17, 2006 1:55 pm Reply with quote

Celebaelin wrote:
he started to write novels. His first, Vivian Grey (1827) was not well received


I've read Vivian Grey and I'm not surprised by its poor reception. It's a turgid, awful book.

 

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