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Jamaica

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violetriga
836576.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 5:06 am Reply with quote

Must be plenty of stories about Jamaica.

Perhaps: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica_national_bobsled_team

 
violetriga
836580.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 5:14 am Reply with quote

I'm sure that Alan will love the opportunity to do the accent!

 
rewboss
836584.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 5:53 am Reply with quote

"My wife came with me on my last trip to the Caribbean."

"Jamaica?"

"No, she wanted to."

(They say old jokes are the best. I say that on this evidence, that's not a safe assumption.)

 
Zebra57
836623.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:56 am Reply with quote

Was that a Jamaica Inn joke?

 
suze
836627.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:13 am Reply with quote

Much as we all love to laugh at the general not-all-that-good-ness of the Jamaican bobsleigh team, it's worth noting that one of them has been a world's champion.

Lascelles Brown represented Jamaica in the 2002 Winter Olympics, where he placed 28th out of 37 in the two man event. That's by no means a dreadful performance in any case, but by 2005 he had become a Canadian (accelerated because his wife is Canadian). He won the world's championship that year, and took a silver medal at the following year's Winter Olympics.

Since then, he's fallen out of the Canadian team - he's now 36, which is old for a top level competitor. But Brown was undeterred and decided to become Monegasque instead of Canadian - and placed seventh in this year's World Cup series representing Monaco.

 
Spud McLaren
836652.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 3:45 pm Reply with quote

Jamaica, despite being the most well-known of the locations in which rum is produced, is not the oldest rum producer. A brief history and likely etymology of rum can be found here.

 
Spud McLaren
836655.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:18 pm Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
... Jamaica Inn...
"It is commonly thought that the inn takes its name from the smugglers who smuggled rum into the country from Jamaica and stored it at the inn. However, the name of the inn is actually said to derive from the important local Trelawney family of landowners, of which two family members served as Governors of Jamaica in the 18th century."
- Wiki

The smugglers who used the Inn were not generally pirates in the usual sense of the word, but wreckers. It appears, though, that the legend of wreckers deliberately luring ships onto the rocks by showing false lights is mainly tosh - see linked article.

******

The Jamaica Inn, London, is on the site of London's first coffee house, apparently - from here.


Last edited by Spud McLaren on Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:30 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
CB27
836656.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:23 pm Reply with quote

Q. Where do you find Jamaican beaver? (you can accompany the question with a picture of a guy looking up a girl's skirt)

I'll leave it to Alan et al to guess some obvious rude answers for the klaxons.

The ansewer is Vermont.

Jamaica the country was named after the original Taino name of Xaymaca, meaning “land of wood and water”.

However, there are other places called Jamaica, such as the Jamaica Pond and Jamaica Plain in Boston, which are most likely named after a regent of one of the chiefs of the Massachusett tribe, called Kuchamakin. As the name became anglicised, it may have also been influenced by the name of the famous island itself as well.

In Vermont, there is a small town called Jamaica, which was given a charter in 1780, and there are many people there today who share surnames with those who signed the original charter. The name came from the Natick and Unami word, Jemeco, which meant Beaver.

 
suze
836679.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:34 pm Reply with quote

There's also a Jamaica in New York City; it's in Queens. As it happens, that Jamaica does have a substantial Caribbean community - but that's not why it is so called.

When the area was first settled by the Dutch under Pieter Stuijvesant in 1656, they called it Rustdorp (Quiet Town, I think). But the British took over in 1683, and renamed it after that indigenous beaver.

There was a hit song in the early 80s called Funkin' for Jamaica. Although it's a song whose main instrumental backing is on piano, it is credited to Tom Browne, who wrote the song and played trumpet on it. The Jamaica of the title is the one in New York City.

 
Zebra57
836697.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 7:48 pm Reply with quote

There seems to be a lot of beaver about New York and Vermont. I would ask if anyone has a photo of a Jamaica Beaver but will resist for fear of being removed from the forum!

 
Zebra57
836700.  Thu Aug 04, 2011 8:30 pm Reply with quote

Jamaica, Queens, New York City once had a station called Jamaica Beaver Street Station which closed in 1913.

 
Moosh
838172.  Fri Aug 12, 2011 9:42 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
Jamaica, despite being the most well-known of the locations in which rum is produced, is not the oldest rum producer. A brief history and likely etymology of rum can be found here.

Possibly.

Mount Gay's claim is founded on being the distillery with the oldest surviving documentation, which doesn't actually prove that they're the oldest surviving distillery, and certainly doesn't prove that they're the first distillery. It's almost certain that spirits that would be recognisable as rum have been made in the Caribbean for much longer than records have been kept, and so almost all of the islands have a distillery that could have a claim to be the oldest, just without any 300-year-old bits of paper lying around.

 
djgordy
838184.  Sat Aug 13, 2011 2:47 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
Q. Where do you find Jamaican beaver?

Moosh wrote:
Mount Gay


I love when there are jokes hidden in the thread.

suze wrote:


There was a hit song in the early 80s called Funkin' for Jamaica. Although it's a song whose main instrumental backing is on piano, it is credited to Tom Browne, who wrote the song and played trumpet on it. The Jamaica of the title is the one in New York City.


It is actually called "Funkin' for Jamaica (N.Y.)". What a great, grea track it is too. One of those to keep in the "emergency" dj box for when the dance floor empties. Just slap this on the decks and the punters come flooding back.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuUy2ShGLyo

 
batleyboy
839914.  Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:32 am Reply with quote

The Barrett Semple-Morris School Of Irish Dancing is on Jamaica Street in London - it just seems such a juxtaposition to me.

 
batleyboy
839915.  Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:36 am Reply with quote

The old quiz question I know for which the answer is Jamaica is where in the world would you find Cornwall immediately to the West and Surrey immediately to the East of Middlesex? (Being the 3 counties into which Jamaica was (and I suppose still is) divided.

 

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