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Judder / shudder when urinating

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andyhas
852102.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:49 am Reply with quote

Not sure if anyone knows the answer to this - the web doesn't. Why do some men get a shudder just before the end of urinating? Apparently most do, but not all, and no one has ever looked into why.

 
rewboss
852125.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:58 am Reply with quote

Cue "taking the piss" jokes...

 
mckeonj
852145.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:00 pm Reply with quote

I get that shiver, and think it might be because I've lost heat. What's the calorific value of 1/3 litre of water+salts at 38*C?

 
tetsabb
852146.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:09 pm Reply with quote

Can't say I've ever noticed towards the end of the process -- somtimes initially, when I really really really need to go.
As I am in my mid - 50s, this is more frequent than it used to be

 
hassan el kebir
852165.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 4:02 pm Reply with quote

and it all seems to take so much longer, too. I don't like this getting old malarkey :-(

I've always put the judder down to a territorial type thing, making sure as many people as possible get splashed so they stay away from you and leave you alone.

 
Spud McLaren
852184.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 4:35 pm Reply with quote

Hmm. My doctor told me, after I'd partly demolished the bath by falling on it due to having passed out whilst passing water (not in the bath), that urinating causes a temporary slight loss in blood pressure. Would this cause a perceived change in body temperature? I know that, if I really, really, really need to go I feel cold, and the relief makes me feel warmer.

 
andyhas
852230.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:02 pm Reply with quote

Weird that no one has ever researched it. It would make the perfect Phd subject to research!

 
bobwilson
852234.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:29 pm Reply with quote

Not only have I never experienced this - I didn't even know anyone else had.

 
andyhas
852237.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:42 pm Reply with quote

:) You've been asking around?

 
bobwilson
852239.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:50 pm Reply with quote

Experiencing a sense of humour failure I suppose I'd have to say, andy, you are either PDR or CB27 and I claim my $5.

:)

 
CB27
852247.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:51 pm Reply with quote

Take me out of the equasion :) The only shudder I ever get is when I physically shake myself at the end to get the last few drops...

 
hassan el kebir
852260.  Mon Oct 03, 2011 1:48 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
I know that, if I really, really, really need to go I feel cold, and the relief makes me feel warmer.



I knew there had to be a plus side to incontinence ;-)

 
mckeonj
852318.  Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:54 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
Hmm. My doctor told me, after I'd partly demolished the bath by falling on it due to having passed out whilst passing water (not in the bath), that urinating causes a temporary slight loss in blood pressure. Would this cause a perceived change in body temperature? I know that, if I really, really, really need to go I feel cold, and the relief makes me feel warmer.

I had a similar episode recently; fainting after a heavy dump, with all the symptoms of a sudden loss of blood pressure.
My GP told me this can happen after evacuation, and added the interesting observation that if there is a loss of blood pressure due to some other cause, this produces a need to 'go to the bathroom'.
He said that some elderly people in care have been found dead on the toilet, having died from whatever caused the blood pressure loss.
If this is indeed true, then it must be reported in the medical media.

 
CB27
852357.  Mon Oct 03, 2011 10:00 am Reply with quote

Cheeseburgers lower your blood pressure, don't take them into the loo...

 
Spud McLaren
852398.  Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:54 pm Reply with quote

On fainting whilst peeing.

On fainting after passing stool

Also:
"Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Fainting may occur if the vagus nerve, which supplies the neck, chest, and intestine, is stimulated. When stimulated, the vagus nerve slows the heart. Such stimulation also causes nausea and cool, clammy skin. This type of fainting is called vasovagal (vasomotor) syncope. The vagus nerve is stimulated by pain, fear, other distress (such as that due to the sight of blood), vomiting, a large bowel movement, and urination. Fainting during or immediately after urination is called micturition syncope. Rarely, vigorous swallowing causes fainting due to stimulation of the vagus nerve." - from here

Can't yet find anything on the shudders, though.

 

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