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djgordy
872112.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:35 am Reply with quote

But he did cheat at cards by using his cock.

 
PDR
872124.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 10:41 am Reply with quote

True, but he didn't found a cult and he never had one of those seriously cool guns that make space-time scrunch in on itself - so he's not even as cool as G'kar. Heck, he's not even a telepath!

PDR

 
suze
872157.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:55 am Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
But he did cheat at cards by using his cock.


One of his cocks - Centauri males have six, and Centauri females have six places for the male to put them.

 
Spud McLaren
872200.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 5:15 pm Reply with quote

Sex on Centauri must be a case of six of one and half a dozen of the other.

 
PDR
872201.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 5:17 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
djgordy wrote:
But he did cheat at cards by using his cock.


One of his cocks - Centauri males have six, and Centauri females have six places for the male to put them.


My cunning plan to expose the geeks has worked!

PDR

 
suze
872205.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 5:34 pm Reply with quote

Damn!

 
PDR
872217.  Wed Dec 21, 2011 6:29 pm Reply with quote

...and youy respond by quoting from the Book of G'kar! In the declaration of principles (draft 1) it clearly says:

"The Universe speaks in many languages, but only one voice. The language is not Narn, or Human, or Centauri, or Gaim or Minbari. It speaks in the language of hope. ANd the one word which is shared between all languages is 'Damn!' "

You are a follower of the prophet G'kar?

PDR

 
tetsabb
873026.  Sun Dec 25, 2011 6:41 am Reply with quote

[quote="PDR"]
suze wrote:
My cunning plan to expose the geeks has worked!

PDR


Are you suggesting that fans of B5 and followers of G'Kar are a bit geekish?
Shame on you!

 
PDR
873029.  Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:14 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:

Are you suggesting that fans of B5 and followers of G'Kar are a bit geekish?


Yes, we are - and proud of it!

PDR

 
CharleyPezza95
897313.  Fri Mar 30, 2012 7:28 am Reply with quote

This has nothing to do with anything else on this board, but I've got something Quite Interesting to share.
You know how a lot of people believe dinosaurs and birds are related in some way?
Well, there is a bird, a kind of duck called a merganser, and one variety has evolved rows of tough serrations along it's beak that resemble teeth, rather like those of a dolphin or killer whale. They're for gripping fish and sea creatures it eats.
There's a good picture of it here http://ibc.lynxeds.com/photo/goosander-mergus-merganser/fine-detail-bill-structure-eclipse-male-adult.
Not exactly concrete evidence that birds were once dinosaurs, but pretty cool, in my humble opinion.

 
Sadurian Mike
897336.  Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:39 am Reply with quote

I'm a believer in the dinosaur-to-bird theory but if a duck evolves tooth-like serrations it cannot support a theory of what has already happened.

After all, most dinosaurs had real teeth and the move towards birds saw the teeth disappear. Having a bird develop serrations just means that evolution has found a niche for a better grip, not that the duck is somehow showing regressive features which link it to dinosaurs.

 
Starfish13
897362.  Fri Mar 30, 2012 9:29 am Reply with quote

CharleyPezza95 wrote:
Well, there is a bird, a kind of duck called a merganser, and one variety has evolved rows of tough serrations along it's beak that resemble teeth, rather like those of a dolphin or killer whale. They're for gripping fish and sea creatures it eats.


A number of birds have bills like the merganser, where the tomium (outer edge of the upper part of the bill) is serrated to provide extra grip on prey items, especially pisciverous species (look closely at a puffin for example). Some hummingbirds also have similar sturctures, allowing them to cut through flowers to steal nectar. Many raptors have one 'tooth' in the upper part of the bill, and a corresponding notch in the lower bill, to allow them to easily sever joints and connecting tissue in their prey, rendering it dead or disabled.

Pink-footed Goose showing the serrated tomium on bill. Presence or absence, and coloration of the tomia can be used as an identification feature.

 
Arcane
898033.  Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:29 am Reply with quote

Hans Larsson, on whom I posted a thread many moons ago, has performed some interesting research into the dinosaur/bird link. Here is another article:

http://creation.com/horner-larsson-chickenosaurus

and from the Mail Online:

"Hans Larsson, a palaeontologist at McGill University in Canada, conducted an experiment in November 2007 into the evolution from dinosaurs’ long tails into birds’ short tails more than 150 million years ago.

Looking at a two-day-old chicken embryo, he made an unexpected discovery.

Expecting to see between four and eight vertebrae present in the developing spine, his microscope instead picked out 16 vertebrae — effectively a reptilian tail.

As the embryo developed, the ‘tail’ became shorter and shorter, until the young bird hatched with only five vertebrae.

Larsson says of the significance of the find: ‘For about 150 million years, this kind of a tail has never existed in birds.

'But they have always carried it deep inside their embryology.’

So, the blueprint for a dinosaur remained locked inside the modern-day bird.

Larsson decided to move from theory to reality.

He wanted to see if he could make a chicken grow a dinosaur’s tail, turning the clock back millions of years.

Manipulating the genetic make-up, he was able to extend the tail by a further three vertebrae.

Larsson had pinpointed a method for turning on dormant dinosaur genes.

If birds retained a dormant tail imprint, did they still retain a memory of dinosaur teeth?

In 2005, Matt Harris and John Fallon, developmental biologists at the University of Wisconsin, noticed something strange while researching mutant chickens.

Harris says: ‘Looking at an embryonic 14-day-old head, I came across the beak and these structures that were not supposed to be there.’

Could they really be teeth? Peeling away the beak in this tiny, mutant bird, the academics revealed sabreshaped formations almost identical to embryonic alligator teeth.

Next, Harris and Fallon attempted to trigger the formation of teeth in a normal chicken, by injecting the embryo with a virus designed to ‘turn on’ the relevant gene.

It was a long shot.

‘Making a tooth is complex,’ says Harris. ‘So the idea of turning on one gene that might be able to do this in an animal that hasn’t made teeth in over 70 million years, was somewhat of a stretch.’

Examining the growing embryo two weeks later, he called colleagues to look at what had happened.

‘You could see very clearly paired structures on the lower jaw.

'And so, a normal chicken can actually grow teeth.’

This was unexpected. Furthermore, the teeth had the same curved shape as dinosaur
fangs.

Following this, Harris and Fallon began to find other dinosaur traits in the DNA of birds, such as scales.

They looked at an ancient Chinese breed of chicken called a Silkie.

It has primitive plumage similar to that believed to grow on some dinosaurs.

By activating a dormant gene, Harris and Fallon attempted to ‘trick’ the chicken’s leg into growing feathers instead of scales.

It worked — they had uncovered the genetic changes that had taken place as the dinosaur evolved into a bird.

Meanwhile, in Canada, Larsson had found that the three-fingered dinosaur claw structure remains hidden within a bird’s wing to this day.

‘The dinosaur fingers are adapted for grasping and snatching prey,’ he explains.

‘If we compare this to modern birds, we see the same structures in their wings but adapted for flight.’

With further research, he believes scientists should be able to transform a bird’s wing back into a dinosaur arm."

 
Jenny
898117.  Sun Apr 01, 2012 3:22 pm Reply with quote

That's fascinating - thanks Arcane.

 
CharleyPezza95
904638.  Fri Apr 27, 2012 7:50 am Reply with quote

Can I just say, I know the meganser is not evidence that birds evolved from dinosaurs. I was simply trying to join in the conversation with something interesting. Which I think is what these boards are for. And it's possible that the merganser, and its relatives, is the closest we shall get to birds with teeth since Archaeopteryx and the other prehistoric feathered dinosaurs.

 

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