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QI Films

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sjb
834035.  Sat Jul 23, 2011 6:29 pm Reply with quote

zomg, I saw Metropolis in the cinema in 2003 (couldn't tell you the specifics on the restoration), but it was AMAZING. One of my favorite films.


Recently, I've seen The Hours and Hawking (2004, tv). Didn't care for either, though I gotta say--Toni Collette never disappoints me. What an ear for accents she has. I wish there had been more of her on screen.

 
zomgmouse
834301.  Mon Jul 25, 2011 6:56 am Reply with quote

sjb, that would have been an earlier restoration. This had (I am told) heaps more than the previous restoration. You should see it if you have the chance.

Today at uni we watched Pandora and the Flying Dutchman, which was a pretty intriguing film, though not without many glaring faults.

 
zomgmouse
834750.  Wed Jul 27, 2011 8:15 am Reply with quote

The 1944 version of Gaslight. It was very well-acted and the art design was magnificent - excellent attention to detail, costume (it won an Academy Award for Interior Design). The only problem was that the writing was awful. The plot and characterisation was lazy. It's not that they expanded the source material (a play by Patrick Hamilton, which I read) that bothered me, just that they couldn't make it work. I mean, when you have a really obvious plot reveal after the first twenty minutes that isn't meant to be obvious at all, it doesn't become much of a thriller. There's a 1940 version of Gaslight which I am also hoping to look into.

 
Zebra57
834827.  Wed Jul 27, 2011 10:54 am Reply with quote

The 1940 version of Gaslight in my opinion is much better than the 1944 Hollywood version.

 
zomgmouse
835127.  Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:28 am Reply with quote

So I was told in the "reading" thread. Hopefully I can watch it shortly.

 
sjb
835551.  Fri Jul 29, 2011 2:14 pm Reply with quote

I watched I'll Sleep When I'm Dead. Clive Owen was better in it than I thought he'd be, and I'd say the same about Jonathan Rhys-Meyers. Nonetheless, it was a pretty useless film. I can't say exactly how useless because I constantly found myself wandering away into another room--it didn't hold my attention at all.

 
Ian Dunn
836205.  Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:58 am Reply with quote

Last night I watched Pom Poko an anime film made by Studio Ghibli, the company behind Spirited Away.

It is certainly an interesting film, dealing with the themes of human development and the destruction of the environment, particually on the wildlife.

However, there are certain questions I feel need asking. For example, how come a film which features shape-shifting raccoon dogs that are able to growth the testicles to huge sizes and use them to crush policemen to death is able to get away as being rated PG? (In subtitles they are referred to as testicles. In the English dub they are called "pouches", although you can clearly see that they are testicles.)

 
zomgmouse
836380.  Wed Aug 03, 2011 4:42 am Reply with quote

On Sunday, I watched Rebecca. I didn't really like the changes they made from the book, namely the fact that in the book he shoots her and in the film he only hits her and she falls over, and also that the shipwreck, in the book, happened the day after the ball, and in the film happened the day of the ball - although that one can probably be explained by time constraints and didn't bother me as much as the first one. That said, I loved it. Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine were fantastic.

On Monday, we watched Jane Campion's The Portrait of a Lady in my film class, which had its moments, but, given its prolific cast, should have done better. I really didn't like Nicole Kidman, though, and she broke accent a lot rather noticeably.

On Tuesday, we watched Primer in Film Society. It was extremely minimalist in the revelation of details and plot, which added to its weirdness and confusion. And I love that.

 
sjb
836446.  Wed Aug 03, 2011 10:39 am Reply with quote

Ahh, Rebecca. For me, very watchable because of Larry O. (J. Fontaine ain't bad either.) I get very distracted when I watch it, though, because of the head-butting between Hitchcock and Selznick. I think Hitchcock even said something years later along the lines of, "It's not one of my films."

 
zomgmouse
836987.  Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:18 am Reply with quote

It certainly didn't feel like one of his films.
And oh, Joan Fontaine. So very lovely.
Incidentally, the next film I watched also had her in it - Max Ophuls' Letter from an Unknown Woman (and yes, I had read the original novella/short story). Very moving.

I went to see three films at this year's Melbourne International Film Festival:
    A Stoker - Russian film about Russia in the late 90s. Lots of allegory. Very harsh.
    Kill List - English film about two hitmen that was very, very bizarre and quite fucked up.
    Attenberg - Greek film about a woman/girl who is discovering her sexuality. Enjoyable and unusual comedy/drama.

 
zomgmouse
837559.  Wed Aug 10, 2011 2:51 am Reply with quote

We watched Brief Encounter on Monday in class. Quaint, but heartwrangling, and very much against convention.

 
Jenny
837640.  Wed Aug 10, 2011 9:48 am Reply with quote

Have you ever seen this version of it though, zomgmouse?

 
zomgmouse
837771.  Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:42 pm Reply with quote

Ha, no I hadn't. Thanks!

On Tuesday I watched Max mon amour, a 1986 semisurrealist comedy with Charlotte Rampling, about a woman who has an affair with a chimpanzee (that's not a spoiler). Quite amusing and clever.

 
zomgmouse
838060.  Fri Aug 12, 2011 9:52 am Reply with quote

Watched the original King Kong. Misogynist, racist, and plenty of other things; also, the acting was awful. But the effects were charming, and the ending was really very good. The last line is a classic.

 
Jenny
838082.  Fri Aug 12, 2011 11:53 am Reply with quote

We went to see The Help the other day - fantastic movie, and well worth seeing, even though I found some of the Mississippi accents a bit impenetrable at times. The movie really gets the period well - the only non-period note was the central white character's hair, which one would distinctly not have seen looking like that in the early 60s, though as a visual sign that she was out of step with most of her peers it worked well.

 

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