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Matches are NOT a Scottish invention!!

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jimgardner1973
36805.  Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:50 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Jimgardener, I am unable to fault you with your assertion that the friction match was invented in Stockton (even if Boyle did come up with something similar a lot earlier, he was Irish).

However,

Quote:
The third is that Stockton high street used to be the widest high street in Europe and is now demoted to the widest in the UK.


This may or may not be the case, but it is not the only town to claim this:

Tourism South East puts the case forward for Thame:

Quote:
Thame has many beautiful old houses and reputedly the widest High Street in the country.

http://www.oxtowns.co.uk/thame/oakfield/

While the Telegraph, Guardian and Country Life go with the general consesus of the rest of the web (421 hits in my search against Stockton's 196 and 18 for Thame) and plump for Marlborough.

Quote:
Marlborough, which is blessed with the widest high street in England


Quote:
"The reason is that, in the 1600s, all the houses in the middle burned down." ... "So now you can park there."


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/main.jhtml?xml=/property/2005/11/23/pmarket23.xml&sSheet=/property/2005/11/26/ixpmain.html
http://www.countrylife.co.uk/lifecountry/markettownsshortlist.php



Widest in the UK.

 
eggshaped
36808.  Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:53 pm Reply with quote

Err, I may misunderstand that, but Marlborough and Thame are both in the UK aren't they?

 
Caradoc
36848.  Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:35 pm Reply with quote

The first passenger train ran in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales, designed by Richard Trevethick in 1804, it didn't run for long as it destroyed the tracks being much heavier than the horse drawn wagons the tracks designed for, the Stockton & Darlington railway didn't run until the 1820's ie 16 years later.

 
jimgardner1973
36862.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 6:31 am Reply with quote

Carl wrote:
The first passenger train ran in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales, designed by Richard Trevethick in 1804, it didn't run for long as it destroyed the tracks being much heavier than the horse drawn wagons the tracks designed for, the Stockton & Darlington railway didn't run until the 1820's ie 16 years later.


As I understand it, Stockton to Darlington is credited as being the first because it was a regular service which turned a profit, as opposed to a failed experiment.

Stockton 1, Wales nill.

 
eggshaped
36893.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 8:58 am Reply with quote

Quote:
As I understand it, Stockton to Darlington is credited as being the first because it was a regular service which turned a profit, as opposed to a failed experiment.


Certainly more successful, but also certainly not:

Quote:
the first passenger line in the world


A nice piece of general ignorance I'd say.

 
jimgardner1973
36959.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 4:07 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Quote:
As I understand it, Stockton to Darlington is credited as being the first because it was a regular service which turned a profit, as opposed to a failed experiment.


Certainly more successful, but also certainly not:

Quote:
the first passenger line in the world


A nice piece of general ignorance I'd say.


Well tell that to the royal mint. It's on the back of every five pound note as being fact.

 
Flash
36963.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 4:54 pm Reply with quote

I think that if we take those last two posts together and give each panellist a fiver then we've got a question, especially as Darlington starts with a D. Anything else about either fivers or Darlington to add to the notes?

 
samivel
36976.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 5:56 pm Reply with quote

I thought Elizabeth Fry was on the back of the fiver

 
ficklefiend
36978.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 6:04 pm Reply with quote

Not every five pund note darling, we have a field mouse on the back of ours.

 
Flash
36979.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 6:05 pm Reply with quote

I've just borrowed one, and you're right. Jim, what were you on about? Old-style fivers, maybe?

 
Caradoc
36993.  Sun Dec 04, 2005 7:41 pm Reply with quote

My fiver has Elizabeth Fry on the back (Any relation?), the one with the Rocket is no longer legal tender, but can be exchanged at a bank.

The Royal Mint makes coins not notes, the Mint is currently in Llantrisant or 'the hole with the mint in it' as its known locally.

De LA Rue print the banknotes which are designed by the Bank of England or the old lady of Threadneedle street.

First is first, the fact that the track wasn't up to supporting the locomotive is irrelevant.

 
Quaint Idiot
37046.  Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:10 am Reply with quote

Carl wrote:
First is first, the fact that the track wasn't up to supporting the locomotive is irrelevant.

And even if it were there was still the Mumbles Railway.

Quote:
On 25 March [1807], the timetable was first executed and this day is officially recognised as the commencement of world's first passenger railway service.


I am not sure what the authors mean by 'officially', but I believe the Guinness Book of Records cites The Mumbles Railway as the first regular passenger service.

Stockton 0, Wales 2?

 
Quaint Idiot
37057.  Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:56 am Reply with quote

Carl, from the Wiki article you refer to I'm not sure that Trevithick's was really a passenger railway. It says it could carry the best part of 100 men, but it sounds like it was an industrial railway, so I suspect they would be workers, rather than paying customers. I guess it all depends on how you define 'passenger'.

 
gerontius grumpus
37175.  Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:22 pm Reply with quote

QI-ly the first modern rails were made by the Bedlington Ironworks on the banks of the river Blyth in Northumberland.
They were known as Bedlington rails for many years in the nietennth century,
Bedlington Ironworks closed down in the 1890s but it appeared on German maps of England in the 1914-1918 war.
Several Zeppelins made sorties over this part of Northumberland in an attempt to bomb it.

 
Caradoc
37205.  Mon Dec 05, 2005 8:20 pm Reply with quote

Quaint Idiot wrote:
I guess it all depends on how you define 'passenger'.


passenger n.
A person who travels in a conveyance, such as a car or train, without participating in its operation.
Informal. A person who participates only passively in an activity.
A wayfarer or traveler

here

 

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