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Strawberry
883670.  Mon Feb 06, 2012 10:06 am Reply with quote

Welcome to Jaseera and Oceans Edge.

 
AlmondFacialBar
883740.  Mon Feb 06, 2012 2:13 pm Reply with quote

tchrist wrote:
djgordy wrote:
This particular bear represents, in Greek mythology, the nymph Callisto who was turned into that form by Hera after she had had been seduced by Zeus who disguised himself as Callisto's true love Artemis. Zeus and Callisto had a son called Arcas who came to live in Arcadia.

Hold on. Youíre saying that Zeus impregnated Callisto while he was impersonating her lover, the goddess Artemis? Just how was that supposed to work, eh?

Call me old-fashioned, but I donít think Artemis is even supposed to have a penis, is she now?

So my girlfriend grows a penis; seems a dead giveaway to me. Pretty sure Callisto would have noticed getting poked by something that shouldnít ought toíve been there in the first place.

I sure know I would, but maybe Iím just a sensitive guy.

--tom


As Callisto and Artemis obviously weren't straight, I dare say Artemis might have numbered a dildo among her possessions, too, no?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
goshisanniichi
886731.  Fri Feb 17, 2012 1:43 pm Reply with quote

Getting back to the subject of Japan, this is an excerpt of a blog post from an American currently residing in Japan. He speaks of odd uses of English by the Japanese in their everyday speach:

Yesterday I took a day off from work and went down to Tokyo for an appointment I had. As the taxi took me to my destination, I was delighted to find that it was located directly across the street from Tokyo Tower, the iconic scale replica of the Eifel Tower that proves Japan secretly wants to be part of Europe. The taxi driver told me, "You really should go up to the top of the tower if you haven't been yet. The 'tension' is really amazing up there." This word (tension) is one of several English words the Japanese use in a slightly odd way, in this case to mean fun or excitement. Here are some other "English" words that might not mean what you think they mean in Japan.

* "fight" means do your best, don't give up (Fight-oh!)
* if there's a girl you like, you should "attack" her (attack = to vigorously pursue love)
* plug your computer into a "consent" (a power outlet, from "concentric plug")
* don't trust the "masukomi" (what the news media is called, from "mass communications")
* if a sporting event is called due to rain, hold a "revenge" challenge later (meaning "a second attempt")
* move to Tokyo and buy a "mansion" (what a condominium is called)
* "glamor," which refers to a woman with a buxom figure
* "feminist," which somehow refers to a man who's very polite and gentlemanly towards women (updated to"herbivore male" these days)
* "free size" (Japanese for "one size fits all" -- we've got some of those on our Japanese fashion pages)
* "rinse-in shampoo," shampoo with "rinse" (aka conditioning) inside

(edited this a bit for formatting and clarity)

 
djgordy
890057.  Wed Feb 29, 2012 3:59 am Reply with quote

This is something Japanese that should find popularity with the great unwashed QI masses.

Chindogu.

Chindogu means "unusual implement" or "unusual tool". A chindogu is an item which appears to have a practical purpose but whose use creates more problems than it solves. The rules for a chindogu are as follows:

1. A Chindogu cannot be for real use.

2. A Chindogu must exist.

3. Inherent in every Chindogu is the spirit of anarchy.

4. Chindogu are tools for everyday life.

5. Chindogu are not for sale.

6. Humor must not be the sole reason for creating Chindogu.

7. Chindogu are not propaganda.

8. Chindogu are never taboo.

9. Chindogu cannot be patented.

10. Chindogu are without prejudice.

The concept of chindogu was invented by Kenji Kawakami.

My current favourite chindogu is the rock, paper scissors dice set.

 
willardhumphrey
895137.  Wed Mar 21, 2012 3:12 am Reply with quote

Most people familiar with history are aware of the date December 7, 1941, when the Japanese Imperial Navy attacked Pearl Harbor.

Can anyone tell me about the SECOND time the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor?

This is quite interesting.
Operation K was a Japanese naval operation in World War II, intended as a reconnaissance of Pearl Harbor and disruption of repair and salvage operations following the surprise attack on December 7, 1941. It culminated on March 4, 1942, with an unsuccessful attack carried out by two Kawanishi H8K "Emily" flying boats. This was the longest distance ever undertaken by a two-plane bombing mission, and the longest bombing sortie ever planned without fighter escort. The mission originated in what are now the Marshall Islands and refueled via submarine in French Frigate Shoals, several hundred miles up the Hawaiian chain from Kauai.

There was yet another attempt planned for the following month but by then the US military were finally paying attention to their intelligence and patrolling French Frigate Shoals for submarines.

You can Wiki Operation K for the rest of the story, but I think this is one more feather in the cap for an episode about Japan.

 
swot
895188.  Wed Mar 21, 2012 6:53 am Reply with quote

Quote:
* "feminist," which somehow refers to a man who's very polite and gentlemanly towards women (updated to"herbivore male" these days)


Meanwhile, a 'herbivore male' (vegetarian) acquaintance of mine was referred to as a 'vegelesbian' t'other week.

Is there a suggestion that the consumption of meat makes a man a boorish misogynist? What a fun language. :)

 
Ian Dunn
896614.  Tue Mar 27, 2012 3:43 pm Reply with quote

The Japanese language has three different types of onomatopoeia:

* Giseigo (擬声語) which are words made by people and animals (like "woof")

* Giongo (擬音語) for the other types of onomatopoeia (like the sound of the wind blowing)

* Gitaigo (擬態語) which technically speaking isn't onomatopoeia, but are "mimetic" words - ones that actions and qualities without making a noise (like worrying).

Source: Tofugu.

 
Hans Mof
897577.  Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:09 am Reply with quote

Since there has been some Greek mythology on this thread it should be balanced with Japanese folklore. Allow me to introduce two Yōkai (lit. strange apparition).


The tanuki (not to be confused with the real world racoon dog) is a shape-shifter and a somewhat humorous monster. Children sing about it's most notable anatomic feature:

Tan Tan Tanuki no kintama wa,
Kaze mo nai no ni,
Bura bura

("Tan-tan-tan", tanuki's bollocks ring/The wind stops blowing/But they swing, swing, swing)

They usually aren't depicted as overtly cruel, but their foolishness and their penchant for practical jokes can lead to, well, accidents, and they've been known to teabag people to death.

-----

A samurai was travelling at night, when he heard someone calling out for him to wait. When he turned around he saw a faceless man removing his clothes and mooning him. As if that wasn't startling enough the strange man spread his cheeks to reveal a huge glittering eye where his anus should have been. This creature is known as a shirime (lit. buttocks eye).

 
Ian Dunn
897578.  Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:25 am Reply with quote

Hans Mof wrote:
The tanuki (not to be confused with the real world racoon dog) is a shape-shifter and a somewhat humorous monster. Children sing about it's most notable anatomic feature:

Tan Tan Tanuki no kintama wa,
Kaze mo nai no ni,
Bura bura

("Tan-tan-tan", tanuki's bollocks ring/The wind stops blowing/But they swing, swing, swing)

They usually aren't depicted as overtly cruel, but their foolishness and their penchant for practical jokes can lead to, well, accidents, and they've been known to teabag people to death.


With regards to the tanuki, they're most famous depiction is in the anime film Pom Poko, created by Studio Ghibli, the same studio to make Spirited Away (the only non-English speaking film to win the Oscar for best animated feature film).

Pom Poko features much of Studio Ghibli's usual themes, especially environmentalism. The film is about a group of tanuki who try to prevent humans developing on their land, using their shape-shifting abilities to disguise themselves as humans or other objects.

The film also features some other Ghibli traits, namely that it is surprisingly adult in some areas, given the fact it is a children's film (it has a PG rating in the UK).

For example, the tanuki can change certain parts of their body rather than the whole of it. One part they can change is referred to in the English dub as their "pouches", but in the original Japanese comes out more accurately as "testicles".

Not only can they change the shape of their gonads, but also swell them up to a huge size. In one section of the film, a band of renegade tanuki use violent means to fend of the humans and try to cursh attacking humans to death with their gigantic balls.

You can see this in this YouTube clip, but there is no sound and the quality is poor.

 
dr bartolo
898018.  Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:13 am Reply with quote

the "Edo ghost cards"
http://playingcards.freewebpages.org/cards82.htm

( scroll a little down the page )

 
Ian Dunn
901641.  Sat Apr 14, 2012 5:29 am Reply with quote

Japan has the 42nd best international cricket team in the world, which is a shame for them because they believe the number 42 is unlucky. In Japanese "42" is pronounced "shi-ni", which means, "to die".

Sources: New Zealand Herald; The Meaning of Tingo by Adam Jacot de Boinod, p. 9.

 
Bondee
901891.  Sun Apr 15, 2012 11:19 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
In Japanese "42" is pronounced "shi-ni", which means, "to die".


The meaning of death, the universe and everything.

 
Ian Dunn
908186.  Thu May 10, 2012 3:39 am Reply with quote

I've just discovered something interesting about the Japanese language which I find rather pleasing. In the katakana script, the letter "e" is written as "エ", which looks almost exactly like our letter "I". This means that if a Japanese person looked at my name, "Ian", they would probably be able to pronounced the first syllable of my name just by looking at it.

 
suze
908335.  Thu May 10, 2012 11:24 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
This means that if a Japanese person looked at my name, "Ian", they would probably be able to pronounced the first syllable of my name just by looking at it.


If a Japanese person looked at your name, "Ian", he'd be able to pronounce it by virtue of it being written in the Roman alphabet.

Only about one Japanese in ten speaks English with much fluency, even though it's a compulsory subject in school. A lot of elderly men speak reasonable English because they learned it from Americans in the 40s, and a lot of younger women speak reasonable English because it's seen rather as a "girls' subject" in school.

But all Japanese know the Roman alphabet, and they are taught it before they study English (the Roman alphabet is taught in Grade 4, while English does not appear until Grade 5). Some signage and advertising material in Japan uses the Roman alphabet, and corporate names from the Western world are often not transliterated when they are used in newspapers and such like.

The katakana represents the vowel sound /e/. That vowel sound is not present in RP English, although it is to be found in some other varieties of English. It's the first part of the diphthong that an RP speaker pronounces in play; many Scots do not have a diphthong here and pronounce only /e/. It's also the sound which French represents by <ť>.

 
tchrist
908392.  Thu May 10, 2012 4:48 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:

Only about one Japanese in ten speaks English with much fluency, even though it's a compulsory subject in school.

A 10% success rate reflects quite poorly on someone.

Itís surprising that the teachers donít get fired for being such miserably unsuccessful, or that the entire course doesnít get jetisoned for being unachievably difficult.

Or maybe both.

Itís like, why bother? Can you imagine if teaching arithmetic resulted in only 10% of that courseís graduates being able to balance their checkbooks? Thatís what I call failure. What a black eye for the school!

Yes, I know Iím being Pollyanna here. Still.

 

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