View previous topic | View next topic

What is sweary-Bob?

Page 1 of 5
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

IrishPippin
825357.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 6:17 am Reply with quote

Hello!
I'm now translating into Russian episode 5 of season 6 about France and I need help.

What could "Colour me very touched, Alan." possibly mean?
And "sweary Bob" is an expression for "a rude person" as far as I understand?

Would you please explain this to me, I'd be really grateful for any help.

Thank you!


Luda

 
CB27
825372.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 7:01 am Reply with quote

I can't recall off the top of my head the episode, and therefore can't remember the context behind these lines, but when Stephen says "Colour me very touched, Alan", I'm guessing it's a slightly sarcastic comment about being moved by something he said. Something like playing an invisible violin.

As for "Sweary bob", I'm guessing it's just a way of giving someone you don't know a nickname based on a trait, and in this case it's that they swear a lot. It's a bit like in the 19th century people you didn't know were given a nickname with the name Jack thrown in, like Jack-the-lad, or Jack-the-ripper, etc...

 
Jenny
825428.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:53 am Reply with quote

Welcome IrishPippin :-)

"Colour me...(some feeling or other)" has become a popular expression in recent years, and is an elaborate way of emphasizing the expression that follows it. I think the image that is intended to be conveyed is that of a child colouring in a drawing. So "colour me surprised" would be an emphatic or perhaps slightly ironic way of saying "I am surprised". In this example, "Colour me very touched" would be an emphatic way of saying "I am very touched". I assume you are a non-English speaker, so 'touched' in this sense means emotionally touched, not physically touched or touched in the sense of being mentally ill ("touched in the head").

 
IrishPippin
825458.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 12:27 pm Reply with quote

Thank you very much for your help and warm welcome :)

Yay! The bob-problem is solved.

The exact context was as follows:
"Stephen: And Alan goes...
# Je t'aime... # song
Stephen: Colour me very touched, Alan."


So I guess "colour me very touched" would mean that Stephen is touched by the fact Alan "loves" him, indeed.
Btw, in Russian the word "touched" is used in exactly the same way :)

 
Jenny
825465.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 12:54 pm Reply with quote

I think, of course, there is some irony for comic effect going on here.

 
MinervaMoon
825479.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 2:17 pm Reply with quote

"Sweary Bob" was the nickname Phill conferred upon the Frenchman on the viewscreens, whom he saw as rather thuggish. It's not an expression, just his personal joke.

 
CB27
825510.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:19 pm Reply with quote

No arguing with Minerva, she has all the transcripts :) I suppose it's something akin to Alan's "Matey Dave" friend - I also knew someone with the same nickname for similar reasons.

 
CB27
825512.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:21 pm Reply with quote

Out of interest, considering the Russian connection, where does the Irish come into it?

My initial guess is you're really into apples :)

 
Spud McLaren
825520.  Mon Jun 20, 2011 5:33 pm Reply with quote

IrishPippin wrote:
What could "Colour me very touched, Alan." possibly mean?
I wonder if it's derived from the song My Coloring Book, recorded by at least 3 artistes in 1962. The lyrics are as follows -

I've a most unusual colouring book
The kind you never see
Crayons ready, very well
Begin to colour me

These are the eyes that watched her as she walked away
Colour them grey
This is the heart that thought she would always be true
Colour it blue
These are the arms that held her and touched her then lost her somehow
Colour them empty now
This is the tie I wore until he came between
Colour it green
This is the room I sleep in and walk in and read in
Hidin' that nobody sees
Colour it lonely please
This is the girl, the one I depended upon
Colour her gone
Colour her gone
Colour her gone

 
IrishPippin
825591.  Tue Jun 21, 2011 5:53 am Reply with quote

omg, I've learned plenty of new things here already :) thank you very much

CB27, the Irish comes from the fact I did a little bit of Irish dance in local "Irish team"and Pippin is the name my friends call me. It comes from Peregrin Took, because I have curly hair and always get into trouble. Though you're absolutely right, Pippin is my favorite kind of apples :)

 
soup
825633.  Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:11 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
No arguing with Minerva, she has all the transcripts :) I suppose it's something akin to Alan's "Matey Dave" friend - I also knew someone with the same nickname for similar reasons.


They called him Dave ja vu, I said they called him Dave ja vu.

 
Neotenic
825638.  Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:16 am Reply with quote

Quote:
What could "Colour me very touched, Alan." possibly mean?


Personally, I think it is a play on 'Colour Me Beautiful', which was a fashion fad in the eighties that saw groups of women gathering together to hold swatches of fabrics against their skin to decide what colour 'type' they were - spring, summer, autumn or winter.

 
MinervaMoon
825689.  Tue Jun 21, 2011 11:34 am Reply with quote

My cocker spaniel was named Pippin as well. (He had curly hair and got into all sorts of trouble.)

 
sjb
825692.  Tue Jun 21, 2011 11:38 am Reply with quote

My goodness, what a cute fellow! :)

 
IrishPippin
825766.  Tue Jun 21, 2011 4:59 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Welcome IrishPippin :-)

"Colour me...(some feeling or other)" has become a popular expression in recent years.

And is it really used by other British people? It's not Stephen's personal joke? Because I've never heard anything like that from Americans or Australians. That's not the subtitles matter now, I'm just curious.

MinervaMoon wrote:
My cocker spaniel was named Pippin as well.

I must admit, your Pippin is much more adorable and pippinish than I am :)

 

Page 1 of 5
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group