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Latvia

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Zebra57
824890.  Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:30 pm Reply with quote

The Republic of Latvia is a Baltic country covering 64,589 km2 (24,938 sq miles)

Capital - Riga
Population - 2,231,503 (2010)
Currency - Lat

The Latvian language has many similarities with Lithuanian and they are the two widely spoken Baltic languages to survive. (Estonian is close to Finnish)

The country has a large Russian minority (27.6% population) many who are non-citizens. Briefly independent 1918-1940, following Nazi occupation, the country was absorbed into the Soviet Union after WW II, but declared independence following the break up of the super-state.

For centuries the fate of Latvia rested with the territorial expansionist policies of its neighbours: Poland-Lithuania, Prussia, Russia, Sweden and later Nazi Germany.

Latvia experienced a period of economic boom 2003 -2007 and Riga became a magnet for property investment. The bubble burst and Latvia is now experiencing an economic downturn, with tourism proving a major growth area in recent years.


Last edited by Zebra57 on Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:05 pm; edited 2 times in total

 
sjb
824895.  Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:59 pm Reply with quote

Wow, the population is much smaller than I would've thought.

 
Zebra57
824896.  Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:01 pm Reply with quote

Apparently this is a true figure for 2010 (UN figures) which I have edited to quote in full. The Latvian resident population is even lower if you consider the large Russian minority!

The figure can be explained by large population movements 1940 to the end of the Soviet era. During Nazi occupation many were sent to concentration camps (especially Jews). Stalin also deported many Latvians when the country was a Soviet state.

 
sjb
824899.  Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:12 pm Reply with quote

The population has been steadily declining since the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/67/Population_of_Latvia.PNG

 
bobwilson
824905.  Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:43 pm Reply with quote

In the late 70s / early 80s I studied Latvian (language) - (probably just to piss off my tutors - well, you know).

At that time the ex-pat Latvian community was in excess of those living in the territory.

Sadly, the only thing I can recall is how to say "mother is in the house" - which I don't suppose is of much use.

 
Nikon
883804.  Mon Feb 06, 2012 7:10 pm Reply with quote

After population census in 2011 - population of Latvia decreased by 10% compared to what was believed in 2010 year (2.067mln instead of 2.248mln).
www.stop.lv

P.S. I think graph of user "sjb" need be changed...

 
Jenny
884014.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:17 am Reply with quote

We can't change graphs posted from elsewhere, Nikon, but thank you for your post and welcome to the QI forums :-)

 
Nikon
884028.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:38 am Reply with quote

It is not problem. In any way, 2.067mln - it was in 2011. Now in Latvia live less then 2 million.

 
suze
884041.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:08 pm Reply with quote

Where have the emigrating Latvians gone?

There certainly are Latvians in the UK; I've met one or two. But the UK doesn't have Latvians in anything like the same numbers as Poles and Slovaks, so are they in Germany?

 
Nikon
884086.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 2:41 pm Reply with quote

The moust emigration goes to Ireland (75% of emigrants).
But negative birth rate is more then emigration!

 
suze
884109.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:08 pm Reply with quote

Thanks Nikon, that's interesting - I had no idea that Ireland had a large Latvian community. And given the perilous state of Ireland's economy, one does have to wonder why it is so popular.

Almost all of the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former USSR have a negative birth rate (i.e. more people die than are born). I think Kazakhstan is the only exception.

Emigration is certainly part of the explanation, but not all of it - in fact, the answers to the question are not fully understood. Demographers have noted some odd things - the lowest birth rates in Western Europe are in Italy and Spain, which are predominantly Roman Catholic and so might be expected to show lower than average use of contraception. The highest birth rates in Western Europe are in Norway and Sweden, even though these countries were amongst the first in the world to make contraception freely available.

 
Bondee
884124.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:48 pm Reply with quote

Nikon wrote:
negative birth rate


They shove the poor little buggers back up?!?

 
plach
884141.  Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:17 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
They shove the poor little buggers back up?


Poor little buggers? Ha
That would hurt.

 
Jenny
884309.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:28 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Demographers have noted some odd things - the lowest birth rates in Western Europe are in Italy and Spain, which are predominantly Roman Catholic and so might be expected to show lower than average use of contraception. The highest birth rates in Western Europe are in Norway and Sweden, even though these countries were amongst the first in the world to make contraception freely available.


I think this may have much to do with the level of support for child-bearing and child-rearing available in the Scandinavian countries - makes the whole business considerably easier.

 
Nikon
884317.  Wed Feb 08, 2012 12:09 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Almost all of the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former USSR have a negative birth rate (i.e. more people die than are born). I think Kazakhstan is the only exception.

Not only Kazakhstan. Kyrgyzstan too:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Kyrgyzstan

I agree, graph of population can go down in many countries, byt not so quickly like in Latvia...
30% per last 20 years
15% per last 10 years
You see: www.stop.lv

 

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