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How old are you?

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eggshaped
76723.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:42 am Reply with quote

Well. Go on. Take a guess.

 
eggshaped
76724.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:48 am Reply with quote

From a recent New Scientist article.

Most of the cells in your body are continually regenerated. If you take an average, your body is probably somewhere between 7 and 15 years old.

Quote:
Whatever your age, your body is many years younger. In fact, even if you're middle aged, most of you may be just 10 years old or less.

This heartening truth, which arises from the fact that most of the body's tissues are under constant renewal, has been underlined by a novel method of estimating the age of human cells. Its inventor, Jonas Frisen, believes the average age of all the cells in an adult's body may turn out to be as young as 7 to 10 years.

Cells from the muscles of the ribs, taken from people in their late 30's, have an average age of 15.1 years, they say.

The epithelial cells that line the surface of the gut ... last only five days. Ignoring these surface cells, the average age of those in the main body of the gut is 15.9 years.

The red blood cells...last only 120 days

An adult human liver probably has a turnover time of 300 to 500 days

The entire human skeleton is thought to be replaced every 10 years or so in adults


As reported in the NY Times

 
carax
76728.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 10:07 am Reply with quote

Damn, someone always gets in there before me, this was highlighted to myself in Bill Bryson's " A short history of nearly everything".

 
Gray
76757.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:13 am Reply with quote

Since the majority of the DNA in you is not human (it's baceterial) this becomes much harder even than that to define.

Isn't that weird? Humans are only minority humans.

 
Andrew
76767.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:39 am Reply with quote

Eek!

 
djgordy
76770.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:44 am Reply with quote

Gray wrote:
the majority of the DNA in you is not human (it's baceterial)


I accidentally spilt some domestos on my hand yesterday and I am 99% dead now.

 
swot
76781.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:10 pm Reply with quote

Don't you quit on us! Two bottles of yakult, stat!

 
Hans Mof
76787.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:35 pm Reply with quote

Since brain cells don‘t divide, my brain (a place where I suppose to find me (if not taking astral bodies, chakras and their like into account)) is as old as disclosed in my passport.

Quote:
Mature neurons are incapable of mitosis. The inability of neurons to divide makes repair of injured nerve tissue more difficult than for most other tissues. Neuron cell bodies lost through injury or surgery cannot be replaced, but if an axon is severed or crushed and the cell body remains intact, regeneration of the injured axon is possible.

 
Celebaelin
76807.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 1:35 pm Reply with quote

Gray wrote:
Since the majority of the DNA in you is not human (it's baceterial) this becomes much harder even than that to define.

Isn't that weird? Humans are only minority humans.

You're going to have to clue me in here Gray, I can't think what you mean.

 
mckeonj
76832.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:32 pm Reply with quote

Does this regeneration of tissues apply to scar tissue from old injuries. I acquired a burn scar on my chest at age 17, and it eventually faded at age 67, a lapse of 50 years. Was the scar tissue being replaced, but gradually "losing the plot"?

 
eggshaped
76838.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:02 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
You're going to have to clue me in here Gray, I can't think what you mean.


Without wishing to put words in Gray's mouth - I imagine it's something to do with this:

Quote:
Most of the cells in your body are not your own, nor are they even human. They are bacterial. From the invisible strands of fungi waiting to sprout between our toes, to the kilogram of bacterial matter in our guts, we are best viewed as walking "superorganisms," highly complex conglomerations of human cells, bacteria, fungi and viruses.

That's the view of scientists at Imperial College London who published a paper in Nature Biotechnology Oct. 6 describing how these microbes interact with the body. The scientists concentrated on bacteria. More than 500 different species of bacteria exist in our bodies, making up more than 100 trillion cells. Because our bodies are made of only some several trillion human cells, we are somewhat outnumbered by the aliens. It follows that most of the genes in our bodies are from bacteria, too.


http://www.wired.com/news/medtech/0,1286,65252,00.html

 
Celebaelin
76843.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:18 pm Reply with quote

OK so there's maybe a kilo or so of bacteria and some fungi representing 500ish species so in a 'Genetic Democracy' I'm outvoted but I weigh (quite a bit) in excess of 100Kg so sod the head count let's talk biomass. The space I occupy is in excess of 99% human biomass which while it does not all contain DNA (hard tissue, red blood cells etc.) it mostly does.

 
djgordy
76844.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:22 pm Reply with quote

A lot of those micro-organisms aren't actually 'in' our bodies though. Many are on the skin etc that covers our bodies and even the ones in our gut are, arguably, not really 'in' our bodies.

 
eggshaped
76845.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:24 pm Reply with quote

If any of our bacterial overlords are reading this. I tried. OK?

 
barbados
76851.  Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:58 pm Reply with quote

So if the majority of human is bacteria, so thats at least 51%
and the average adult male is 60% water
is it any wonder I have more tha the average number of arms?

 

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