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Bloodiest Battle on British Soil

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ali
798248.  Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:37 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
Standard practice for ancient sources is to divide the numbers quoted by a considerable amount.


I agree, but I think that the figures quoted for Towton should be divided by at least a certain amount, and the Tacitus account is still the highest claimed butcher's bill.

 
T J Alex
891059.  Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:48 am Reply with quote

Before the Battle of Towton Moor, both sides declared that they would neither seek nor grant quarter .

Archeological Digs have confirmed that at least some prisoners were killed and thrown into a ditch after they'd ceased fighting.

 
soup
891080.  Sat Mar 03, 2012 7:03 am Reply with quote

I had never heard of Towton mind you I never did history beyond 2nd year[1] and I am a jock so was taught a lot more about Culloden, Prestonpan, Bannockburn, Stirling bridge etc.
Have heard of a battle at Sedgemore but I have no idea who won indeed I have no idea who was fighting.

[1] I seem to remember spending an inordinately long time drawing a leather strap and buckle on my history folder and spending a long time building/investigating a viking village.

 
Efros
891090.  Sat Mar 03, 2012 7:29 am Reply with quote

My history teacher must have been a rebel, we spent a year studying ancient Egypt.

 
Posital
891190.  Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:33 pm Reply with quote

How about the battle of Malaya in 1941-2? Fought in British Malaya, which was British Soil. Maybe not that many dead, but over 100,000 captured.

Towtown gets the medal for English Soil.

 
Sadurian Mike
891197.  Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:53 pm Reply with quote

Official figures are a little over 130 000 captured of a total casualty figure of 138 708. PoWs don't generally count when it comes to 'bloodiestness', so we would have to use the figure of approximately 8 700.

Remember, however, that the figures are based on the number of troops sent to peninsula at the time. Care needs to be taken because they use numbers assuming theoretical full strength units (13 brigades at 10 000 each, plus a few thousand fortress troops)* and the number of missing is almost impossible to determine.

*9th Indian Division (2 brigades)
11th Indian Division (2 brigades)
8th Australian Division (2 brigades)
18th British Division (3 brigades)
12th, 28th, 44th, 45th Indian brigades
Singapore fortress troops


The War Against Japan, vol. 1 (HMSO, 1957)

 
Efros
891205.  Sat Mar 03, 2012 1:56 pm Reply with quote

Somewhat coincidentally the teacher I'm referring to was my teacher at Bourne School, sited at the Alexandra and Gillman Barracks in Singapore.



Gillman annex, my History classroom is right in the middle.

 
Posital
891264.  Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:01 am Reply with quote

Wow - it's amazing what they can fit into vans nowadays...

I suspect that the battle of malaya wasn't really a single battle anyway.

 
Zebra57
891374.  Sun Mar 04, 2012 12:19 pm Reply with quote

Soup wrote: "Have heard of a battle at Sedgemore but I have no idea who won indeed I have no idea who was fighting."

The Battle took place on 6 July 1685 in Somerset and involved the forces of James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, who was the illegitimate son of Charles II and the forces of the King. His attempt to seize the Crown from his uncle James II failed and ended in his brutal execution and his followers experiencing the summary justice of Judge Jefferies.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1247726.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 11:52 am Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
Soup wrote: "Have heard of a battle at Sedgemore but I have no idea who won indeed I have no idea who was fighting."

The Battle took place on 6 July 1685 in Somerset and involved the forces of James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, who was the illegitimate son of Charles II and the forces of the King. His attempt to seize the Crown from his uncle James II failed and ended in his brutal execution and his followers experiencing the summary justice of Judge Jefferies.


It's often said that this was the last pitched battle to be fought on English soil but this is debatable.

A much later contender is the Battle of Bossenden wood, fought in 1838 between a small group of labourers from the Kent area and a detachment of troops from the Canterbury area sent to arrest their leader. eleven men were killed in the confrontation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bossenden_Wood

 
PDR
1247737.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:37 pm Reply with quote

Other contenders would include various pitched-battles during the 1984/5 Miners Strike, of course.

PDR

 
Efros
1247742.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:43 pm Reply with quote

Or an Old Firm encounter in the 70/80s,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzJO9K__n9A

 
ali
1264140.  Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:17 pm Reply with quote

Efros wrote:
Or an Old Firm encounter in the 70/80s,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzJO9K__n9A


In the words of Nigel Blackwell:

Half Man Half Biscuit wrote:
Singing "Sealed Knot Society, letís see you try and do this one:
Luton Town Ė Millwall, nineteen eighty-five".

 
Baryonyx
1264187.  Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:04 am Reply with quote

Anyone hear Andy Zaltzman linking this apt anniversary to that of our exit from the European Union on the Now Show?

 
GuyBarry
1264199.  Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:41 am Reply with quote

Baryonyx wrote:
Anyone hear Andy Zaltzman linking this apt anniversary to that of our exit from the European Union on the Now Show?


Yes. Interesting coincidence!

 

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