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Morse's first message.

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Norman Castle
794870.  Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:09 pm Reply with quote

Steven: And now we go to Washington. The date is 11th May 1844. Samuel Finley Breeze Morse has set up the world's first telegraph line. It goes 40 miles from here to Baltimore. Morse sent a message along the line to test that it was working properly. What was the message?


Alan: What hath God wrought?

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Incorrect. The first message sent was "Everything worked well."

The more famous message was sent at a public display on the 24th May. Numerous other messages had passed down the line before then.

http://www.famousamericans.net/jedidiahmorse/


While we're on the subject, what does S.O.S. stand for?

Answer: Nothing. It's a prosign, the initials don't stand for anything.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosigns_for_Morse_code

 
Bondee
795650.  Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:14 am Reply with quote

Norman Castle wrote:
While we're on the subject, what does S.O.S. stand for?


Save Our Sausages.

 
Sadurian Mike
795813.  Sun Mar 13, 2011 6:24 pm Reply with quote

Silly Old Sod.

 
Bondee
796758.  Wed Mar 16, 2011 4:52 pm Reply with quote

According to the Irish navy, it means Sink Our Ships.

 
djgordy
796938.  Thu Mar 17, 2011 10:05 am Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
Save Our Sausages.


Shave Our Sausages?

 
Sadurian Mike
797279.  Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:20 am Reply with quote

Are you expecting an operation on your gentleman's area?

 
Arcane
797284.  Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:52 am Reply with quote

Norman Castle wrote:


While we're on the subject, what does S.O.S. stand for?

Answer: Nothing. It's a prosign, the initials don't stand for anything.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosigns_for_Morse_code


Already discussed in this post, almost 3 years ago to the day. Spookeh! post 296791

 
Eezebilt
828454.  Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:41 am Reply with quote

Norman Castle wrote:
Steven: And now we go to Washington. The date is 11th May 1844. Samuel Finley Breeze Morse has set up the world's first telegraph line. It goes 40 miles from here to Baltimore. ...


Umm? Why is this the 'world's first telegraph line'?

There were early experimental uses of static electricity propagating over short distances since the 1750s, which could be counted as 'sending messages'. Indeed, this was overtly proposed in 1753.

When batteries were invented in 1800 DC could be used, which made for a more reliable transmission, though the first vaguely practical telegraph I know was Francis Reynold's one in 1816, using high-voltage static - he got 8 miles.

By 1833 Gauss had a 1-km DC length going, and Munich got a telegraph network in 1935-6.

Cooke and Whetstone patented a telegraph in the UK in 1837, and installed the first commercial telegraph in 1839. In 1845 it was famously used to catch a fleeing murderer.

So I wonder why QI appears to have ignored all these prior claims...?

 
soup
828475.  Sat Jul 02, 2011 2:06 pm Reply with quote

Eezebilt wrote:

When batteries were invented in 1800 ?


Not a Baghdad battery believer then.

 
tetsabb
839888.  Mon Aug 22, 2011 7:17 am Reply with quote

And was the second message, "Greetings to you. I am a Nigerian Prince, formerly Sup-President of the First Regional Bank of Lagos..."???

 
Alfred E Neuman
840178.  Tue Aug 23, 2011 9:32 am Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
Norman Castle wrote:
While we're on the subject, what does S.O.S. stand for?


Save Our Sausages.


In the pipe band I belong to it stands for Same Old Shit, and refers to the set containing Scotland the Brave (Or as Nokia called it as a ring tone "Brave Scotland").

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1247244.  Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:33 am Reply with quote

While we're on the subject, what does S.O.S. stand for?

Answer: Nothing. It's a prosign, the initials don't stand for anything.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosigns_for_Morse_code[/quote]

In fact they weren't intended to represent letters of the alphabet. They were merely a series of dots and dashes designed to replace the multiplicity of call signals that were both too many and cumbersome to tap out in an emergency.

 
Jenny
1247745.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:58 pm Reply with quote

I deleted a number of posts after this one, which I felt were unbecoming to this forum and contributed nothing either to the general level of knowledge or the entertainment of readers.

 
GuyBarry
1247749.  Mon Sep 04, 2017 1:00 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
I deleted a number of posts after this one, which I felt were unbecoming to this forum and contributed nothing either to the general level of knowledge or the entertainment of readers.


Thank you. And now to continue:

It's a misapprehension to believe that the International Morse code distress signal is "SOS". Spaces between letters are three units long (equivalent to the length of a dash), whereas spaces between the individual dots and dashes are one unit long (the length of a dot). If you wanted to transmit the three letters "SOS", it'd be "dit-dit-dit" <gap> "dah-dah-dah" <gap> "dit-dit-dit", rather than "dit-dit-dit-dah-dah-dah-dit-dit-dit".

"SOS" is just a convenient way of remembering the pattern of dots and dashes by breaking it up into groups. You could equally well use "VTB", "IJS", "VGI" or "SMB", but I presume "SOS" was easier to remember. The standard practice is to draw a bar over the top of the letters to show that the dots and dashes need to be transmitted as a continuous sequence rather than individual letters.

 

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