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The Gambia

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Zebra57
1026413.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:41 am Reply with quote

Following an uneasy relationship between its current leader and some members of the Commonwealth over human rights issues and electoral irregularities, the President of The Gambia has announced that his country is leaving the organisation.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24376127
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-13376517


Last edited by Zebra57 on Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:51 am; edited 1 time in total

 
chrisboote
1026416.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:47 am Reply with quote

It's The Gambia
One of only two countries to have the definite article in their name
(The other being The Bahamas)

 
Zebra57
1026418.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:51 am Reply with quote

Duly amended CB

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026421.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:55 am Reply with quote

Actually there are lots more once you go beyond the notion that the entire world speaks English. Switzerland carries the feminine definite article in all its own languages (Die Schweiz/ La Suisse etc.), as do Slovakia, Czechia and Ukraine in German (going back to when they were provinces of the Austro-Hungarian empire). Iran and Iraq are both male in German and carried the definite article in English up to a very short time ago, same with Lebanon that was a mountain range long before it became a country, The Netherlands are very definitely still The Netherlands even in English and even now, and so on...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:05 am; edited 1 time in total

 
chrisboote
1026427.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:43 am Reply with quote

I agree with you on all points EXCEPT The Netherlands
I give you
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlands
"The Netherlands is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
and
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/nl.html *
"The larger islands of Sint Maarten and Curacao joined the Netherlands and Aruba as constituent countries forming the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
So the 'the' is lowercase and not part of the country's name

*Quite Interesting to note that CIA World Factbook has not been shut down during the current crisis

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026433.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:01 am Reply with quote

Ok, you're right, come to think of it. Though we might want to consult 'Yorz as the ultimately competent lady there.

Oh, and Turkey is feminine in German, too.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
chrisboote
1026435.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:08 am Reply with quote

Ik weet genoeg Nederlanders en bina genoeg Nederlands, so Ik niet hoef te

At which point someone who can really speak Dutch, as opposed to my bastardised Afrikaans, will correct my spelling, grammar and probably punctuation as well 8-)

 
chrisboote
1026437.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:10 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Oh, and Turkey is feminine in German, too.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

Are you sure?
I've only ever heard people say "Türkie" (sometimes "Türkiye") never "Die Türkie"

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026438.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:11 am Reply with quote

Die Türkei, always. Native German here...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
chrisboote
1026442.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:41 am Reply with quote

Thank you 8-)

 
WordLover
1026445.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 6:05 am Reply with quote

The People's Democratic Republic of Korea
The People's Republic of China
The Russian Federation
The United Arab Emirates
The United Kingdom
The United States of America

chrisboote wrote:
I agree with you on all points EXCEPT The Netherlands
I give you
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlands
"The Netherlands is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
and
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/nl.html *
"The larger islands of Sint Maarten and Curacao joined the Netherlands and Aruba as constituent countries forming the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
So the 'the' is lowercase and not part of the country's name
But if "the" were not part of the country's name, then the right thing to write would be

"Netherlands is a constituent country of ..."

and

"The larger islands of Sint Maarten and Curacao joined Netherlands and Aruba ..."

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026447.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 6:19 am Reply with quote

But then it would have to be THE USA and THE United Arab Emirates, too. It isn't though, because here the article only signifies the plural in the countries' name and is not a part of them.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1026525.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:06 am Reply with quote

We've done this topic a couple of times before, so I'll attempt to summarize. The Bahamas and The Gambia both consider the English definite article "The" as an integral part of their short form name, and require it to be capitalized. Both are countries in which English is the official language.

Two other countries are inconsistent on the use of the definite article when communicating with the outside world in English. The government of (The) Netherlands is increasingly using just Netherlands, although it also uses both the Netherlands and The Netherlands. (Nederland in Dutch - the short form name is singular and no article is used.)

English is one of the two official languages of (The) Philippines. This country is inconsistent both in English and Tagalog, seemingly unsure about articles in both (The) Philippines and (Ang) Pilipinas.

Comoros does not use a definite article in English, nor yet in French which is one of its three official languages (Comores rather than Les Comores). Swahili doesn't have a definite article (so Komori), but in Arabic the definite article is used (al Qumuri).

That's do with Arabic grammar, although I don't know Arabic and hence don't know the details. Of the countries where Arabic is an official language, about half of them use a definite article in the short form Arabic name (eg al Kuwayt) and half don't (Qatar). Note that we say Algeria in English; it ought really to be Geria to be consistent with Morocco and Libya, but it isn't.

Maldives does not use a definite article, any more than Ukraine does. Ukrainians consider the use of the definite article in English not only wrong but offensive. I don't really know why.

 
Zebra57
1026613.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:35 pm Reply with quote

According to Sky News the withdrawal of The Gambia from the Commonwealth has been likely for a while. The President has among his many acquired titles that of "Admiral of the Nebraska Navy and Kentucky Colonel!"

http://news.sky.com/story/1149799/commonwealth-relief-over-gambia-withdrawal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahya_Jammeh

 
gruff5
1026646.  Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:44 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
... Iran and Iraq are both male in German and carried the definite article in English up to a very short time ago...


Really? So it was "The Iran" and "The Iraq" until recently? I've never heard those countries said like that.

 

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