View previous topic | View next topic

Ireland

Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2

legspin
793820.  Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:38 am Reply with quote

There was a boxing tournament held every year called the Celtic Youths. As the name suggests it was held between 15 and 16 year olds from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany and Newfoundland.

 
samivel
793850.  Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:25 am Reply with quote

Did Cornwall and the Isle of Man just not enter, or were they snubbed for not being Celtic enough?

 
legspin
793900.  Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:54 am Reply with quote

Actually I do think Cornwall was involved but not the Isle of Man.

It was the newefoundland bit I found strange until I was told that it was 'coz of all the Irish immigrants to that area

 
Efros
793910.  Mon Mar 07, 2011 11:17 am Reply with quote

There's a lot of Scots up that way too, they held the Royal National Mod in Nova Scotia a while back , there were more Scottish Gaelic only speakers there than there was in Scotland, not difficult to achieve as the last single language Gaelic speakers in Scotland died in the early 70s.

 
suze
793929.  Mon Mar 07, 2011 1:17 pm Reply with quote

There are still a couple of thousand speakers of Cape Breton Gaelic (i.e. Scottish Gaelic, although the distinctive pronunciation means that Scottish Gaels sometimes find it hard to understand). There are probably no first language speakers any more, largely because the use of Gaelic was more or less illegal during WWII (kids speaking Gaelic in school were beaten, and to use it on the telephone was an arrestable offence).

Newfoundland Irish is about gone by now - ten people on The Rock claimed it as their first language in the 2001 census, but no one has ever managed to find any of them. In truth, it was probably extinct as a first language by about 1930, and only a handful are by now able to speak it at all.

But there absolutely is a clear Irish influence on the English spoken in Newfoundland - especially among older people away from St John's.

Listen, for instance, to this sound clip (.mp3). The speaker who introduces the clip is an Irishman of longstanding residence in Canada, but the guy who follows and talks about rainbows is a Newfoundlander.

 
chrisboote
1027601.  Tue Oct 08, 2013 9:30 am Reply with quote

Things have moved on....
Dublin now has a population of just over 2m people - about 1.5m permanently resident - having almost doubled in size since 2009, while Ireland has a whole has a population of 5.5m, about 4.75m permanently resident
This makes it the EU country with the highest non permanent population, and the second highest proportion of people living in the capital after Singapore

In the 'Big Mac' index, used by a number of international companies, which compares prices based upon a basket of goods including, yes, a Big Mac, a can of coke, a next-day-delivery letter, a 500g box of cornflakes, an 800g loaf of bread, a litre of semi-skimmed milk and a bar of milk chocolate, and (crucially) renting a two bedroom apartment for one month, Dublin came out as the third most expensive capital city in the world after Oslo and Tokyo

Irish mobile telephone networks charge the world's highest prices for a basket of services

Beer in Dublin is the most expensive in the EU

BUT in the 'Happy Planet Index', showing the extent to which countries produce long, happy and sustainable lives for the people that live in them, Ireland comes 14/151 for general well being of its citizens, beaten only by Denmark, Sweden and Finland in the EU

It is also had top rated secondary education system in the world in the 2006 survey, although it is believed to have slipped a few places by 2013

Its citizens 'enjoy' the highest proportion of organic food in the EU in their diet, and consume more 'local' produce than any other EU country except France

So, a mixed bag

 
suze
1027631.  Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:48 am Reply with quote

chrisboote wrote:
This makes it the EU country with the highest non permanent population, and the second highest proportion of people living in the capital after Singapore


Did I miss Singapore's accession to the EU?

chrisboote wrote:
In the 'Big Mac' index, used by a number of international companies ... Dublin came out as the third most expensive capital city in the world after Oslo and Tokyo.


More serious question now. The Big Mac Index is indeed a cost-of-living measure which is often quoted, and for most of the world's major cities it has some validity.

But based on what I've heard from people who have been, Reykjavík is right up with Oslo and Dublin as one of the most expensive cities in Europe. It has no McDonald's though - there aren't any in Iceland - so this presumably means that its Big Mac Index cannot be calculated. What other measures can we use which do not exclude Reykjavík, and do they indeed show it up with Dublin and Oslo at the top of the list?

 
Efros
1027647.  Tue Oct 08, 2013 11:32 am Reply with quote

I can vouch for that I bought a bottle of beer in Reykjavik airport bar, which I think was duty free and it was $9 US, that was back in 2006.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1027690.  Tue Oct 08, 2013 2:50 pm Reply with quote

Fun fact about Iceland - life there is so expensive that people fly to Ireland to do their Christmas shopping. Only here life is so expensive we prefer to do our Christmas shopping in the States. In short - Icelandic prices must be truly horrendous.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Efros
1027693.  Tue Oct 08, 2013 3:46 pm Reply with quote

They used to do weekend runs to Glasgow as well, fly over Friday morning, shop all day, get hammered Friday night, repeat on Saturday and part of Sunday and then return on Sunday evening .

 
chrisboote
1027743.  Wed Oct 09, 2013 3:19 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
chrisboote wrote:
This makes it the EU country with the highest non permanent population, and the second highest proportion of people living in the capital after Singapore


Did I miss Singapore's accession to the EU?

He he he
I should have said "the world's second highest proportion of people living in the capital"
Thanks

Quote:

chrisboote wrote:
In the 'Big Mac' index, used by a number of international companies ... Dublin came out as the third most expensive capital city in the world after Oslo and Tokyo.


More serious question now. The Big Mac Index is indeed a cost-of-living measure which is often quoted, and for most of the world's major cities it has some validity.

But based on what I've heard from people who have been, Reykjavík is right up with Oslo and Dublin as one of the most expensive cities in Europe. It has no McDonald's though - there aren't any in Iceland - so this presumably means that its Big Mac Index cannot be calculated. What other measures can we use which do not exclude Reykjavík, and do they indeed show it up with Dublin and Oslo at the top of the list?


I asked this question when I worked for Readers' Digest, and was told to shush, as they didn't send stuff to Iceland anyway

 

Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group