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Ireland

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donte's candle
789195.  Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:16 am Reply with quote

quick facts
ireland is divided into 4 provinces which are munster,leinster,ulster and connacht. each province has counties in them(32 in total)the biggest of which is co.cork and the smallest is co.louth. the capital dublin has 1,000,000 people making it the most densly populated county. the longest river is the river shannon which flows down the east coast. the largest lake is lough neagh in ulster. the higheat mountain is carrantuohill(car-on-too-hill) it stands at 3406 feet and is in co.kerry. famously the british tryed to plant ireland four differant times (laos-offaly plantation,munster plantation,ulster plantation and cromwellian plantation) the ulster plantation being the most successful still having effects to this day.
list of counties by province
munster=clare,limerick,kerry,cork,waterford and tipperary
leinster=louth,meath,dublin,wicklow,wexford,kildare,kilkenny,westmeath,
longford,offaly and carlow
connacht=galway,mayo,sligo,leitrim and roscommon
ulster=donegal,*derry,*antrim,*down,*armagh,*tyrone,*fermanagh,
monaghan and cavan

*,counties under british rule
the language mainly spoken in ireland is english but we have our own language. irish is very closly linked to eastern european languages as it comes from the celts.
some irish inventions you may not have known include the hyperdyrmic syringe,the harpoon gun,shorthand writing,soda water,hurling,gaelic football,seismology,the guided missile,portable defibulater and the beufort scale(mesurement of wind speed)
ireland is the world number 1 for tea drinking with four cups a day average per person and ireland is the 4th largest divided nation(ROI and UK)
i hope you now know a little bit more about the lump of land i call home

NOTE:if i got anything wrong i apologise i had a bit of time to kill, otherwise i hope you enjoyed this and thank you.

 
Jenny
789696.  Sun Feb 20, 2011 7:39 am Reply with quote

Welcome to the forums donte's candle, and thank you :-)

 
legspin
792854.  Thu Mar 03, 2011 9:29 am Reply with quote

With regards the cricket yesterday ...

Ahaha Ahahahahahahaha etc

 
suze
793046.  Thu Mar 03, 2011 7:22 pm Reply with quote

LOL! The husband and I watched the closing stages of that game from the safety of the public house (we don't have Sky). And OK, so I may have made vaguely similar noises.

Mind you, it came back to bite me on the butt today after Canada screwed up an excellent chance to beat Pakistan. Now I'm by no means an expert on cricket, but I got the impression that the standard of the Canada / Pakistan match - both teams and the umpires - was well below what you'd expect at this level. Husband reckons that his club would have beaten either of them; that may be hyperbole, but even I could tell that neither was much good.

 
donte's candle
793269.  Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:57 pm Reply with quote

legspin wrote:
With regards the cricket yesterday ...

Ahaha Ahahahahahahaha etc


i know one day no one cares about cricket and the next day it is everyones favourite sport

 
legspin
793342.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 5:18 am Reply with quote

donte's candle wrote:
legspin wrote:
With regards the cricket yesterday ...

Ahaha Ahahahahahahaha etc


i know one day no one cares about cricket and the next day it is everyones favourite sport


Granted, cricket is seen by many as the ulitmate garrison game here but I'm not sure your statement holds true in this case.

Beating the Sasannachs at anything is always fun (given our history of course) but to do it at the quintessential english game and as part-timers versus professionals, it was a bit of Spanish inquisition moment and almost as torturous to watch.

 
suze
793346.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 5:37 am Reply with quote

Coming from a country where we derive national pride from beating the USA at anything, I can well believe that!

Although it's a bit of a stretch to define the Irish team as "part-timers", to be fair. Of the fifteen members of the Irish squad, thirteen are full time professionals (nine contracted to English counties and four to Cricket Ireland). That's more full timers than Zimbabwe has, and comparable with the numbers that Bangladesh, New Zealand, and the West Indies have.

Meanwhile, the ICC plans to have only ten teams at the next World Cup, and the suggestion seems to be that this will exclude Ireland and the Netherlands - even though they are probably better than Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. Eight automatic spots and two qualifiers would surely be a better way to go, but apparently India is opposed to any such idea.

 
legspin
793348.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 5:41 am Reply with quote

I didn't realise the proportion of county players was that high.

 
donte's candle
793480.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 4:06 pm Reply with quote

legspin wrote:
donte's candle wrote:
legspin wrote:
With regards the cricket yesterday ...

Ahaha Ahahahahahahaha etc


i know one day no one cares about cricket and the next day it is everyones favourite sport


Granted, cricket is seen by many as the ulitmate garrison game here but I'm not sure your statement holds true in this case.

Beating the Sasannachs at anything is always fun (given our history of course) but to do it at the quintessential english game and as part-timers versus professionals, it was a bit of Spanish inquisition moment and almost as torturous to watch.


i mean in comparison to gaa and soccer etc. you have to admit it isn't (or at least wasn't very popular) and it isnt regularly broadcast on rte or tg4
P.S. i am not trying to sound like a smart arse but it is kind of hard to avoid it on this forum

 
suze
793486.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 5:36 pm Reply with quote

At the last World Cup, there was a rather good Irish commentator whom RTÉ had sent to the tournament. He doesn't seem to be there this time; is that down to money?

I also get the impression that interest in cricket in Ireland is largely confined to the North and Dublin. In the South outside Dublin, do very many people have any interest at all?

(Actually, it's comparable in Canada. There's a reasonable cricket following in Toronto, Vancouver, and Vancouver Island, but practically zero elsewhere.)

 
legspin
793506.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 7:28 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
At the last World Cup, there was a rather good Irish commentator whom RTÉ had sent to the tournament. He doesn't seem to be there this time; is that down to money?

I also get the impression that interest in cricket in Ireland is largely confined to the North and Dublin. In the South outside Dublin, do very many people have any interest at all?

(Actually, it's comparable in Canada. There's a reasonable cricket following in Toronto, Vancouver, and Vancouver Island, but practically zero elsewhere.)


Most of the major urban areas would have at least one cricket club and club formation is gathering speed. Dublin of course has the most clubs down south, mainly on the south side of the city. Nth Co. Dublin has quite a few as well. I play for one of them up there. Cork has at least four and would dominate Munster. Ulster has enough teams for two separate leagues

I didn't play until I was 19. We moved back to the Rep. of Ire when I was nine. Where we moved (the sth west) to even mentioning the game would get you looked at funny at the very least but while I was in the local Technical college some brave souls in the local rugby club set up a cricket team (for a laugh primarilly I have always thought). It took and they are still going.

 
suze
793512.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:10 pm Reply with quote

Thanks, legspin. Who knows what the future holds - especially since the powers that be don't want the likes of Ireland in their World Cup - but husband reckons that a wager on Ireland to be the next Test Match nation would be a sound investment.

Cricket in Canada has had an odd history. One hundred years ago, the Canadian team (and indeed the American team) was probably not far behind the teams of countries like New Zealand - but there was money in baseball, and none in cricket.

There followed a long period in which cricket was largely the preserve of the white upper middle class of Toronto, before a team composed mostly of immigrants from the Caribbean saw Canada reach the World Cup in 1979. There were three white men of Canadian birth in that squad, but the guys who are the age to be those men's sons tend to play baseball or rugby union* (a summer sport in Canada) rather.

Since then - and as in Britain - the South Asian community has rather supplanted the Caribbean community as the source of cricketers. One look at the names of this year's Canadian squad would leave that in no doubt.

But there are by now two Canada-born Asians on the team, and that's likely to be the way forward. As for white Canadians, well of course there's been John Davison - but although he was born in BC, he's an Aussie first and foremost; his parents were in Canada on a teaching exchange from Aus. In any case, Davo has by now hit the big 40 and this is surely his last major tournament (especially since he was dropped for the last game). But last year's Under-15 squad included both white and black players of Canadian birth alongside the Asian majority.


* Rugby union in Canada has its own problems, some of them caused by the geographically awkward fact of the main playing strength being in Vancouver and Newfoundland. Newf has semi-seriously considered seeking to affiliate to Ireland rather than Canada, since Dublin is actually one thousand miles nearer than is Vancouver!

 
samivel
793531.  Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:05 pm Reply with quote

Yeah, but it's not as easy to drive to.

 
suze
793619.  Sun Mar 06, 2011 8:05 am Reply with quote

The difficult of driving from Newf to Vancouver is precisely equal to the difficulty of driving from Newf to Dublin - that is to say, you can't do either thing.

On the other hand, it's not as easy to fly to. It's a sad fact, but at present there are no scheduled flights east from Newfoundland - anyone wanting to fly from Newfoundland to Europe must travel via either Halifax or Toronto. A person wanting to travel from Newfoundland to the Azores - which are 900 miles west of Portugal and 1,500 miles east of Newf - would have to fly via Toronto and Lisbon.

This is a downside of progress, unfortunately. It used to be that airplanes from Europe to the west coast of North America needed to refuel en route - and Gander Airport was a convenient place for them to do that. But no longer is a refueling stop needed, which arguably leaves Newfoundland more isolated from Europe than it has been for one thousand years.

 
bobwilson
793798.  Sun Mar 06, 2011 11:08 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
which arguably leaves Newfoundland more isolated from Europe than it has been for one thousand years


and is there a downside?

 

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