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Inland waterways

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gerontius grumpus
780568.  Thu Jan 27, 2011 7:46 am Reply with quote

I'll be most disappointed if inland waterways don't get a mention, I suppose I'd better prepare for disappointment then.

By waterways I mean navigable waterways. Rivers streams and ditches that have never been navigable are watercourses.
Some of the more obscure and quite interesting points could include staunches and flash locks, manure canals (actually for transporting sea sand), the role of canals in the winning of the American west and the theory proposed in the Piercebridge Formula, suggesting that the Roman army made extensive use of water transport to supply the army on the frontiers in Britain.

 
samivel
780579.  Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:06 am Reply with quote

Is there a size of craft limit to the definition of navigable? There's a couple of small rivers near me that a person could easily swim down, but I doubt you'd get a very big boat on them.

 
Jenny
780714.  Thu Jan 27, 2011 12:33 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:

Some of the more obscure and quite interesting points could include staunches and flash locks, manure canals (actually for transporting sea sand), the role of canals in the winning of the American west and the theory proposed in the Piercebridge Formula, suggesting that the Roman army made extensive use of water transport to supply the army on the frontiers in Britain.


I'm interested in the statement I bolded there, gg. Do you mean canals, or do you mean natural waterways that are navigable?

 
Starfish13
780787.  Thu Jan 27, 2011 4:26 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:
By waterways I mean navigable waterways. Rivers streams and ditches that have never been navigable are watercourses...


In England and Wales, there is also an issue of access on potentially navigable waterways. About 98% of waterways in England and Wales have no public access, as anglers succesfully lobbied for the exclusion of waterways from the CRoW Act. This means that rafting, kayaking, canoeing, paddling and wild swimming is more than likely to be forbidden on your closest watercourse.

In Scotland, acess to inland waterways has always been permitted for non-motorised vessels (i.e. canoes/kayaks etc), coming from the traditional use of river systems to transport timber. This was enshrined in the Land Reform Act of 2003, which allows responsible use of inland waterways and waterbodies for leisure and recreation. There is a big poem on the wall of the bar in Glenmore Lodge bemoaning grumbling anglers, and how paddlers really got there first in Scotland.

 
sjb
780790.  Thu Jan 27, 2011 4:48 pm Reply with quote

The state in which I live has more navigable waterways than any of the other Lower 48. (When you don't have a lot to brag about, you tend to grab at straws.)

:P

 
Firemouth
780791.  Thu Jan 27, 2011 4:53 pm Reply with quote

Birmingham has more miles of canal than Venice.

 
gerontius grumpus
784237.  Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:47 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
gerontius grumpus wrote:

Some of the more obscure and quite interesting points could include staunches and flash locks, manure canals (actually for transporting sea sand), the role of canals in the winning of the American west and the theory proposed in the Piercebridge Formula, suggesting that the Roman army made extensive use of water transport to supply the army on the frontiers in Britain.


I'm interested in the statement I bolded there, gg. Do you mean canals, or do you mean natural waterways that are navigable?


Doh I answered these questions days ago but it's not on here.

What I meant was that canals like the famous Erie canal were a first stage in the journey west for a lot of settlers. Although they didn't go very far west they were an important part of the journey. More waterways were planned but then the railroads came and they were much more practical.

By waterways I mean canals and navigable rivers.

 

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