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JumpingJack
33343.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:44 am Reply with quote

The Dundee Law (571 ft, 174 m) is a prominent volcanic plug.

s: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1998

 
Flash
33355.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 4:36 am Reply with quote

There are a number of these laws in that part of the world - one of them is the Bass Rock, an island which was the last Jacobite stronghold in Britain.

It's a bizarre idea: a volcano which has entirely eroded away, leaving a column of basalt, which was the stuff which was erupting from it when it was active.

 
ficklefiend
33424.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:49 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
There are a number of these laws in that part of the world - one of them is the Bass Rock, an island which was the last Jacobite stronghold in Britain.

It's a bizarre idea: a volcano which has entirely eroded away, leaving a column of basalt, which was the stuff which was erupting from it when it was active.


Which is what Edinburgh castle is built on.

 
JumpingJack
33461.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 7:59 am Reply with quote

I put that in because it was literally the only interesting sentence in the whole of the Ecyclopaedia Britannica article on Dundee.

Let's show the nice people out there we can do better...

 
JumpingJack
33466.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:07 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Kitchenmaid Wanted

Wages commence at 36 per annum, with board, lodging, laundry and uniform. The whole subject to deductions for pension under the Act of 1909.


Small ad in local Dundee paper, January 1930.

http://www.dundeecity.gov.uk/bygone/jan1930.htm

 
JumpingJack
33469.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:12 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Maid's Narrow Escape

Dundee Fire Brigade were summoned to an outbreak of fire at 33 Lawton Road, occupied by James Kerr, yesterday.

A maid had been melting some polishing wax on a gas cooker when the wax suddenly burst into flames. She carried the tin downstairs to the door, but the heat compelled her to drop it.

The fire brigade, found on arrival that their services were not required. Damage was confined to a door which was scorched by the flames.


April, 1930

 
JumpingJack
33473.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:19 am Reply with quote

What are we to make of this. Listed under the heading "Employment" in April, 1905

Quote:
Milkman

Milkman (married) - Wanted at Whitsunday. One with a wife to milk preferred. Apply Batchelor, Gotterstone, Broughty Ferry.

 
Mostly Harmless
33476.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:24 am Reply with quote

..


Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:13 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Gaazy
33482.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:34 am Reply with quote

After Dundee cake, surely the city's most important product was the acclaimed poet and tragedian, William McGonagall?

 
JumpingJack
33487.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:40 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I earnestly hope the inhabitants of the beautiful city of Dundee
Will appreciate this little volume got up by me,
And when they read its pages, I hope it will fill their hearts with delight,
While seated around the fireside on a cold winter's night;
And some of them, no doubt, will let a silent tear fall
In dear remembrance of WILLIAM McGONAGALL.

 
Flash
33492.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 8:46 am Reply with quote

In the film Crocodile Dundee there's a scene in which Paul Hogan is in the bath, with a film running on the TV in the other room. That film is Major Dundee.

Sorry, I wandered in here from the 'Useless Information' thread.

 
Mostly Harmless
33611.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:44 pm Reply with quote

..


Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:14 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
33638.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:44 pm Reply with quote

John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee (1648-89), a Jacobite commander, was known as "Bonnie Dundee" or "Bluidy Clavers", depending on which side of the English/Scottish religious and civil war you were on.

A charismatic leader who roused the Highlanders for the exiled James II of England (VII of Scotland), he was killed at the Battle of Killiecrankie in 1689.

His story inspired Sir Walter Scott to write the poem Bonnie Dundee. It was later set to music, and can be read and heard here.

 
ficklefiend
33647.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:22 pm Reply with quote

There was a massacre of the inhabitants of Dundee during the civil war. The people fled to the church in the centre, hoping for protection. The Jacobites proceeded to slaughter them.

This was treated as a bit of a myth and rumour, no one was really sure if it was just an exageration...until they started to dig out the foundations the new shopping centre next to the church.

I need to go and check this out, since it was another fact given to me by a tour guide, but I thought I would throw it down anyway.

EDITED:

Ok, so, looking through the history of the church I found-

"In the middle of the 17th century, Dundee was besieged again, this time by the English General Monk. Being a well-fortified and thriving Royalist stronghold, Dundee withstood the siege for six weeks until the garrison and many innocent citizens were betrayed and massacred, and the Governor was ignominiously beheaded after three days heroic defence of the Great Tower of St. Mary. Periodic excavations in Nethergate unearth human skeletons and bones, probably victims of Monk's massacre. "

http://www.dundeestmarys.co.uk/history.html

So not quite bang on, but not a complete lie either.

 
ficklefiend
33649.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:31 pm Reply with quote

The thought does strike me, however, that the bones might just be from an old graveyard.

 

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