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Dodgson, Rev. Charles Lutwidge

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Mostly Harmless
33658.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 7:41 pm Reply with quote

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Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:05 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Caradoc
33939.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:09 pm Reply with quote

CL Dodgson was one of the founders of acturial maths, used to calculate life insurance premiums & pensions

 
Mostly Harmless
34315.  Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:21 pm Reply with quote

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Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:05 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Anna
34345.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 5:42 am Reply with quote

Wiki says it was Christ Church.

Quote:
Through his own laziness, he failed an important scholarship, but still his clear brilliance as a mathematician won him the Christ Church Mathematical Lectureship, which he continued to hold for the next 26 years.

 
Quaint Idiot
34403.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 9:40 am Reply with quote

Mostly harmless wrote:
Quote:
Lewis Carroll's Visual and Formal Logics
Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) first published his visual method in The Game of Logic, a book published in 1886, extending it ten years later in Symbolic Logic, Part I. Originally designed to teach the theory of inference in Aristotelian logic and to improve on the earlier diagrammatic methods of Leonhard Euler (1772) and John Venn (1880), Carroll's method has not been considered seriously as a visual logic system.
Symbolic Logic and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly

 
djgordy
34429.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 11:27 am Reply with quote

[quote="Quaint Idiot"]
Mostly harmless wrote:
]Symbolic Logic[/i] and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly


There is a story that Queen Victoria read Alice in Wonderland and liked it so much that she asked for more books by the same author. She was then sent a book on symbolic logic.

 
WordLover
36379.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:40 am Reply with quote

Quaint Idiot wrote:
Mostly harmless wrote:
Quote:
Lewis Carroll's Visual and Formal Logics
Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) first published his visual method in The Game of Logic, a book published in 1886, extending it ten years later in Symbolic Logic, Part I. Originally designed to teach the theory of inference in Aristotelian logic and to improve on the earlier diagrammatic methods of Leonhard Euler (1772) and John Venn (1880), Carroll's method has not been considered seriously as a visual logic system.
Symbolic Logic and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly
You do indeed remember correctly. At the end of Symbolic Logic, he gives a foretaste of Parts II and III, including:

* several problems which have premisses involving 3 or 4 of the variables (e.g. "A man, who neither gambles not eats pork-chops for supper, is sure to have a ravenous appetite") and

* one problem which appears to involve a 3-value logic (e.g. "some of the Monitors are awake" and "some of the Monitors are asleep" are used, indicating that we must account for any of 3 possibilities: all awake, all asleep, some of each)

Carroll did a considerable amount of work on Part II, and what exists, together with the complete Part I, was published by Harvester Press in 1977 (ed. William Warren Bartley, III). Part II describes Carroll's algorithm (not entirely systematic) for solving such problems.

 
WordLover
36384.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:50 am Reply with quote

[quote="djgordy"]
Quaint Idiot wrote:
Mostly harmless wrote:
]Symbolic Logic[/i] and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly


There is a story that Queen Victoria read Alice in Wonderland and liked it so much that she asked for more books by the same author. She was then sent a book on symbolic logic.
Sometimes the story specifies that the Queen asked for the author's next book, and that he sent her On The Condensation of Determinants. The story is false, and Dodgson repudiated it.

BTW if you do decide to use Dodgson in QI, please note that the g is silent. In Dodgson's lifetime, sometimes people got his name wrong, but the mistake was the other way around: people knew the pronunciation but misspelt the name as Dodson.

 
samivel
36399.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:42 pm Reply with quote

How do you pronounce Lutwidge?

 
Noel Ramadan
36403.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 3:11 pm Reply with quote

I've always heard it pronounced and pronounced it Ludwig. I'm QE though (not Queen Elizabeth, but like her, being Quite English). I suppose a dastardly hun might slurrr it into LudViTCH.

 
Quaint Idiot
36514.  Fri Dec 02, 2005 8:30 am Reply with quote

Well Mrs Windsor (or should I have said Saxe-Coburg-Gotha) is at least partly dastardly Hun.


Last edited by Quaint Idiot on Fri Dec 02, 2005 10:01 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Noel Ramadan
36528.  Fri Dec 02, 2005 9:38 am Reply with quote

Well yes, this is true and was only omitted from my original post to save space and keep to the point...but now you've pursued it I was going to mention that Libby and I are quite but not entirely English. Statistically I am as Irish as she is Kraut.

 
Scurra
38782.  Mon Dec 12, 2005 2:53 pm Reply with quote

I'd like to add that Dodgson invented what is generally known as the "Swiss" tournament system, used mostly in Chess Tournaments although he invented it for use in Lawn Tennis events. Instead of being a straight knock-out event, players play multiple rounds, at each round generally only playing competitors who had done as well as them (so, in round 2, all the winners would play each other, as would the losers.)
The virtue of this system is that one bad performance doesn't eliminate you from the contest, which is encouraging for the bad players and important for the good ones.
Unfortunately, it is an horrendously difficult system to administer (even with computer assistance) and it also makes for less exciting outcomes (since the better players ought to consistently dominate instead of being eliminated due to a bad day), thus it hasn't really made it into the mainstream, which is a shame. It's certainly a far better approach than things like "group matches" which is the generally used alternative to knock-out events.

 
NickF
1135744.  Tue Jun 02, 2015 1:42 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
It's a photograph of Alice Liddell as an adult. Here's one of Dodgson's versions of her as a child:



I was trawling through old subjects to see whether the photo I am posting below had been up here before. I don't think that it has, so here it is.



This is the same Alice, a bit older, photographed by Julia Margaret Cameron Doesn't Alice look striking?

 
CharliesDragon
1135752.  Tue Jun 02, 2015 2:34 pm Reply with quote

Alice after she snuffs the Red Queen from the throne and takes control over Wonderland? She certainly looks like she could. :P

 

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