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Dodgson, Rev. Charles Lutwidge

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Jenny
33317.  Mon Nov 21, 2005 6:10 pm Reply with quote

Must be some interesting things about him, surely?

Although he is remembered for his children's literature he is remembered for, among his talents were mathematics, invention (including a Nyctograph, a device to record, Braille-like, any thoughts during the night without getting out of bed), word and chess puzzles and had remarkable skill with the camera when the craft was in its infancy, having his work shown at London's annual Photographic Exhibition.

He was a devout member of the Church of England, ordained a Deacon though seldom preaching because of his stammer. And he had an affinity for Tuesdays.

Alice in Wonderland was not just written for one girl, but for three - Alice Liddell and her two sisters. They contain many mathematical twists, word plays, political caricatures and in-jokes. Although Alice was the heroine (incidentally, the Alice of Tenniel's drawings is not Alice Liddell, who had short, dark hair) the three also had a joint role as the three sisters who lived in the treacle well, the names being puns or distortions of the originals, for example Lacie for Alice (an anagram).

 
Mostly Harmless
33608.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:31 pm Reply with quote

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Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:05 am; edited 1 time in total

 
JumpingJack
33619.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:11 pm Reply with quote

Go on then, give us a clue...

 
Jenny
33639.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:47 pm Reply with quote

It's a photograph of Alice Liddell as an adult. Here's one of Dodgson's versions of her as a child:

 
Flash
33648.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 6:24 pm Reply with quote

Good Heavens, Jack - it's Booty!

 
Mostly Harmless
33658.  Tue Nov 22, 2005 7:41 pm Reply with quote

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Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:05 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Caradoc
33939.  Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:09 pm Reply with quote

CL Dodgson was one of the founders of acturial maths, used to calculate life insurance premiums & pensions

 
Mostly Harmless
34315.  Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:21 pm Reply with quote

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Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:05 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Anna
34345.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 5:42 am Reply with quote

Wiki says it was Christ Church.

Quote:
Through his own laziness, he failed an important scholarship, but still his clear brilliance as a mathematician won him the Christ Church Mathematical Lectureship, which he continued to hold for the next 26 years.

 
Quaint Idiot
34403.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 9:40 am Reply with quote

Mostly harmless wrote:
Quote:
Lewis Carroll's Visual and Formal Logics
Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) first published his visual method in The Game of Logic, a book published in 1886, extending it ten years later in Symbolic Logic, Part I. Originally designed to teach the theory of inference in Aristotelian logic and to improve on the earlier diagrammatic methods of Leonhard Euler (1772) and John Venn (1880), Carroll's method has not been considered seriously as a visual logic system.
Symbolic Logic and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly

 
djgordy
34429.  Fri Nov 25, 2005 11:27 am Reply with quote

[quote="Quaint Idiot"]
Mostly harmless wrote:
]Symbolic Logic[/i] and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly


There is a story that Queen Victoria read Alice in Wonderland and liked it so much that she asked for more books by the same author. She was then sent a book on symbolic logic.

 
WordLover
36379.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:40 am Reply with quote

Quaint Idiot wrote:
Mostly harmless wrote:
Quote:
Lewis Carroll's Visual and Formal Logics
Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) first published his visual method in The Game of Logic, a book published in 1886, extending it ten years later in Symbolic Logic, Part I. Originally designed to teach the theory of inference in Aristotelian logic and to improve on the earlier diagrammatic methods of Leonhard Euler (1772) and John Venn (1880), Carroll's method has not been considered seriously as a visual logic system.
Symbolic Logic and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly
You do indeed remember correctly. At the end of Symbolic Logic, he gives a foretaste of Parts II and III, including:

* several problems which have premisses involving 3 or 4 of the variables (e.g. "A man, who neither gambles not eats pork-chops for supper, is sure to have a ravenous appetite") and

* one problem which appears to involve a 3-value logic (e.g. "some of the Monitors are awake" and "some of the Monitors are asleep" are used, indicating that we must account for any of 3 possibilities: all awake, all asleep, some of each)

Carroll did a considerable amount of work on Part II, and what exists, together with the complete Part I, was published by Harvester Press in 1977 (ed. William Warren Bartley, III). Part II describes Carroll's algorithm (not entirely systematic) for solving such problems.

 
WordLover
36384.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:50 am Reply with quote

[quote="djgordy"]
Quaint Idiot wrote:
Mostly harmless wrote:
]Symbolic Logic[/i] and The Game of Logic are still in print as one volume. I borrowed from a library, I suppose about 15 years ago. They contained lots of amusing convoluted syllogisms, and some diagrams which were a little like Karnaugh maps, if I remember correctly


There is a story that Queen Victoria read Alice in Wonderland and liked it so much that she asked for more books by the same author. She was then sent a book on symbolic logic.
Sometimes the story specifies that the Queen asked for the author's next book, and that he sent her On The Condensation of Determinants. The story is false, and Dodgson repudiated it.

BTW if you do decide to use Dodgson in QI, please note that the g is silent. In Dodgson's lifetime, sometimes people got his name wrong, but the mistake was the other way around: people knew the pronunciation but misspelt the name as Dodson.

 
samivel
36399.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 2:42 pm Reply with quote

How do you pronounce Lutwidge?

 
Noel Ramadan
36403.  Thu Dec 01, 2005 3:11 pm Reply with quote

I've always heard it pronounced and pronounced it Ludwig. I'm QE though (not Queen Elizabeth, but like her, being Quite English). I suppose a dastardly hun might slurrr it into LudViTCH.

 

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