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Help? A Book Mentioned in Ep.2?

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Ahti
759429.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:50 am Reply with quote

Hello,

I hope I'm posting in the right area and not bothering you too much. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the name of the author Stephen mentiones in episode 2 (H Anatomy)? It's around 8:30 and the question starts of Proust's handshake, Gyles Brandreth then talks about homosexuality and visiting Africa and mistakes Proust for this author whose name I'm looking for.

I'm sorry if I sound inattentive or stupid, but it is a bit difficult to listen such a fast-paced show in a language that's not my native one, and throw in some French and I'm totally confused. I think the name of the book Stephen mentions he wrote is "Corridor", but I couldn't find anything by only that one word. I'm a literary student and always looking for interesting books to read.

Thanks so much for your help.

 
Moosh
759432.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:00 am Reply with quote

I remember them talking about Proust's Ŕ la recherche du temps perdu for a while in that episode, is that what you were thinking of?

 
Ahti
759440.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:32 am Reply with quote

Thanks, but that wasn't the one I was looking for. I know Proust but this was apparently some other Frenchman.

 
suze
759449.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:53 am Reply with quote

André Gide. Stephen asserts that M Gide invented the word "homosexual" for his book Corydon (1924) (which book is a serious of discourses on homosexuality).

In fact, Stephen is wrong here. The first citation we have for "homosexual" is from 1892, in a translation by the American neurologist Charles G Chaddock of a German work called Psychopathia sexualis (by Richard, Baron von Krafft-Ebbing (1886)).

 
hassan el kebir
759497.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 3:44 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
a German work called Psychopathia sexualis (by Richard, Baron von Krafft-Ebbing (1886)).


I found that lurking on a shelf at the Relate charity shop in Taunton, next to it was an interesting version of 'Walter, My Secret Life' that was abridged to buggery, not one bit of naughtiness was left in. I bought both books ;-)

 
Celebaelin
759539.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:21 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Richard, Baron von Krafft-Ebbing

Teacher, if not mentor, to a certain C.G. Jung.

 
suze
759546.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:30 pm Reply with quote

Ah yes. Supposedly it was reading Krafft-Ebbing that convinced Jung that he wanted to be a psychiatrist. Before that, he'd been planning to be the more general kind of physician.

 
Flash
759549.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:36 pm Reply with quote

hassan el kebir wrote:
I found that lurking on a shelf at the Relate charity shop in Taunton

Every bookshop needs a "Highbrow Smut" section - what would be the Dewey Decimal Classification, do we reckon?

 
Neotenic
759560.  Thu Nov 11, 2010 8:03 pm Reply with quote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYWT4uYOPvs

 
costean
760862.  Wed Nov 17, 2010 4:31 pm Reply with quote

580.08 ?

(For those (ie me) who define highbrow as reading their calculators upside down)

This would seem to put it in the Plant section, so maybe MLK Dewey had forseen the invention of the calculator and decided to pre-empt any schoolboyish misuse of his system.

 
eggshaped
876588.  Tue Jan 10, 2012 8:25 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:

Quote:
André Gide. Stephen asserts that M Gide invented the word "homosexual" for his book Corydon (1924) (which book is a serious of discourses on homosexuality).

In fact, Stephen is wrong here. The first citation we have for "homosexual" is from 1892, in a translation by the American neurologist Charles G Chaddock of a German work called Psychopathia sexualis (by Richard, Baron von Krafft-Ebbing (1886)).


A correspondent writes:

Quote:
Although Gide and his book Corydon probably contributed enormously to the invention of the homosexual, the term (as well as heterosexual) was actually coined by Austrian born Hungarian journalist, translator and human rights campaigner Kertbeny Károly Mária (Karl-Maria Benkert 1824-1882) in 1869 (the year Gide was born) and first appeared in pamphlets challenging the Prussian sodomy law.

Sincerely,
Kata Rita Pócs


Another thing invented by Hungarians?

 
CB27
876632.  Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:29 pm Reply with quote

The Gay Hussars!!!

 
suze
876635.  Tue Jan 10, 2012 1:05 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Another thing invented by Hungarians?


Ooh, it just might be! (Although I discover that Kertbeny was at least as Austrian as he was Hungarian. He was born in Vienna and his original name was Karl-Maria Benkert as your Hungarian correspondent notes; he adopted the name Kertbeny Károly Mária while working as a journalist in Buda.)

But yes, his German language pamphlet on what we would now call human rights is currently considered to provide the earliest citation for "homosexual". He also introduced the terms "heterosexual", "monosexual" (a person who prefers masturbation to partnered sex), and "pygist" (a person who prefers anal sex to vaginal sex). The last of those words never really caught on, although it does get used once in a while in Christian books about sex which also use words like "onanism".

Apparently there's a Finnish rapper who goes by the name of "Dr Pygism". Whether he knows what his name means, who can say.

 
Droid
876751.  Wed Jan 11, 2012 5:36 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
"pygist" (a person who prefers anal sex to vaginal sex).

This is changing my views of Barbarella.

 
tetsabb
887684.  Tue Feb 21, 2012 6:40 am Reply with quote

hassan el kebir wrote:
an interesting version of 'Walter, My Secret Life' that was abridged to buggery,
(my italics)
Is that really the right phrase to use in this context?

 

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